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Extended Audio Sample Those Guys Have All the Fun: Inside the World of ESPN Audiobook, by James Andrew Miller Click for printable size audiobook cover
3.15 out of 53.15 out of 53.15 out of 53.15 out of 53.15 out of 5 3.15 (20 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: James Andrew Miller, Tom Shales Narrator: James Andrew Miller, Matt McCarthy, Joan Baker Publisher: Hachette Book Group Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: May 2011 ISBN: 9781609410797
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ESPN began as an outrageous gamble with a lineup that included Australian Rules Football, rodeo, and a rinky-dinky clip show called Sports Center. Today the empire stretches far beyond television into radio, magazines, mobile phones, restaurants, video games and more, while ESPN’s personalities have become global superstars to rival the sports icons they cover.

Chris Berman, Robin Roberts, Keith Olbermann, Hannah Storm, Bill Simmons, Tony Kornheiser, Stuart Scott, Erin Andrews, Mike Ditka, Bob Knight, and scores of others speak openly about the games, shows, scandals, gambling addictions, bitter rivalries, and sudden suspensions that make up the network’s soaring and stormy history. The result is a wild, smart, effervescent story of triumph, genius, ego, and the rise of an empire unlike any television had ever seen.

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Quotes & Awards

  • “Those Guys Have All the Fun is a de rigueur read for sports fans who wonder how a fired hockey announcer used a $9,000 credit card advance to start a broadcasting empire that changed what we think about sports and how we view them.”

    Denver Post

  • “Packed with entertaining stories of unpleasant people and awful behavior…Offers a nuanced look at ESPN, does some top-notch TV-biz reporting on the early days of the cable industry, and offers compelling behind-the-scenes stories…Aa serious, impressive piece of work.”

    Entertainment Weekly

  • “This treat for sports fans has a cast of characters that is huge and varied.”

    New York Times

  • “A rollicking glimpse behind the guys and gals who sport around at ESPN, America’s sports church. Amen.”

    Publishers Weekly

  • “As highly anticipated by sports junkies as a Chicago Cubs championship, [Those Guys Have All the Fun] provides painstaking details on how a nutty idea concocted by a father-son team developed into a brand worth more than the NHL, MLB, and NBA combined…Shales and Miller manage to create a page-turning document about the ultimate dysfunctional workplace.”

    Minneapolis Star Tribune

  • “Fascinating and compulsively readable.

    Wall Street Journal

  • A #1 New York Times Bestseller

Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jeromey | 2/19/2014

    " Read the first half of the book, which solidly chronicles the first years of ESPN. After about 1995 it gets a little fuzzy in terms of what's covered and what's overlooked. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Scott Martin | 2/9/2014

    " This book offers a series of first-hand accounts of how an early cable TV network grew into the mega-sports enterprise that ESPN is today. The book follows the 1st 30 years of the sports program, speaking with key players at all levels. Interestingly enough, the key stories do not so much center on sporting events, at least in the early years. At the beginning, it was a power struggle between individuals with dreams, egos, and access to money. The book can take on a bit of a gossipy feel, but with the book composed almost completely of 1st person interviews, it could be expected. It is not meant as condoning or condemning ESPN, but the multitude of perspectives and the point/counterpoint of various events/situations, etc make it a good read for those of us who grew up watching ESPN and the evolution of the network. It also didn't hurt that I got it at half-price at Target (and this was within the 1st couple of weeks after release). "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rob | 2/6/2014

    " Simple, but strangely addictive. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Melissa | 1/16/2014

    " Not what I was expecting. It's an industry book, about the business side. After about 250 (of 700+!) pages I gave up and just started skimming for interesting parts. Some well thought out material on the meaning of race in sports and the meaning of gender in sports journalism. Only 6 piddly pages on GameDay! Apparently everyone and their brother was interviewed for this book, up to and including Obama. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nicholas Reese | 1/5/2014

    " A look behind the curtains of ESPN, but ultimately I couldn't really get into the he said/she said of stuff that happened 30 years ago to a tv station. Most of it is just petty "This guy hated that guy" stuff. I guess if you watch a lot of ESPN and know who some of these people are it would be interesting, but I don't so it's not. But if you're really fascinated by what some executive had to go through to make some small tweak to Sportscenter, then oh boy is this the book for you. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jj Kwashnak | 12/25/2013

    " Interesting but overly long story of ESPN told through interviews with those who were there. Got tedious if you were not a total ESPN head, but the story is interesting, especially if you can skim while you read. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Grant84 | 12/24/2013

    " really long book about the devil... interesting. but really long "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Gloria | 11/18/2013

    " Even as someone who is not a sports fan, I found this book to be fascinating ESPN dominates so much in what I think about sports and I liked seeing how it developed from the perspective of people who were and are on the inside. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bryan Robinson | 6/18/2013

    " Interesting read about how my favorite television channel started. Surprising details about some of the anchors on ESPN. Hard to believe that people did not think a 24 hour sports channel would ever make it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Josh | 5/18/2013

    " I enjoyed parts of this book a lot, but it is way, and I mean way, too long. The parts dealing with the founding of espn and the Patrick/Olberman years were great, but the more recent stuff dragged. Overall, a good read for anyone nostalgic for the heydays of the worldwide leader. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Andy Holland | 3/16/2013

    " Wait for the paperback. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kevin | 1/5/2013

    " Dull and repetitive. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cortney Kittridge | 10/22/2012

    " While this book is not children's literature, it is appropriate for junior high or high school students. The text is lengthy but easy to read due to the interview type nature of the writing. I enjoyed learning more about the behind the scenes work that makes ESPN the successful network it is. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Danny Johnson | 10/1/2012

    " If you grew up on ESPN like I did, you'll love this. It's also a great expose on success as it sews a thread of what it took, not only ESPN as a network to be successful, but individual anchors and business people involved. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Aaron Maki | 7/16/2012

    " I enjoyed the look inside at the personalities and the history of ESPN. Easy read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Corey | 6/19/2012

    " Interesting to see how the network has grown over time. A lot of jerks worked/are working for this network. It is a miracle EPSN did not get nailed for sexual harassment in the early days. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bethany Nguyen | 1/6/2012

    " It was a doozy to finish, but well worth the effort. SO INTERESTING; loved all of the anecdotes. Obviously I knew ESPN was a big deal. I just don't think I realized HOW big of a deal they were til reading this. Really liked it. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Dan Taylor | 9/17/2011

    " Deathly dry, uninteresting and repetitive look at the rise and rise of ESPN. Read more like a text on Starting a Cable Channel 101 than an intriguing oral history of arguably one of the most important popular culture developments of the last 50 years. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 John | 6/1/2011

    " a fun look at the growth of espn as a business, as told in quotes and interviews. not as much down and dirty as you would want, but still informative and interesting. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Roger | 5/27/2011

    " "ESPN basically has to have one of their talent talk about Hitler or put a picture of their dick on a phone - which is what that Salisbury guy did - before they'll do anything about any of these various crazies, because they don't have to. Nobody can touch them." - Dick Ebersol "

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About the Author
Author James Andrew Miller

James Andrew Miller is an award-winning journalist and coauthor of the #1 New York Times bestseller Those Guys Have All the Fun: Inside the World of ESPN; Live from New York: The Complete, Uncensored History of “Saturday Night Live” as Told by Its Stars, Writers, and Guests, which spent four months on the New York Times bestseller list; and Running in Place: Inside the Senate. He has written for the Washington Post, the New York Times, Vanity Fair, and others. He is a graduate of Occidental College, Oxford University, and Harvard Business School.