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Download The Time Machine Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The Time Machine Audiobook, by H. G. Wells
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (114,046 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: H. G. Wells Narrator: Brian Cox Publisher: Penguin Audiobooks Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: May 2012 ISBN:
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Penguin Classics presents H. G. Wells' The Time Machine, adapted for audio and now available as a digital download as part of the Penguin English Library series. Read by the actor Brian Cox. 'Great shapes like big machines rose out of the dimness, and cast grotesque black shadows, in which dim spectral Morlocks sheltered from the glare'. Chilling, prophetic and hugely influential, The Time Machine sees a Victorian scientist propel himself into the year 802,701 AD, where he is delighted to find that suffering has been replaced by beauty and contentment in the form of the Eloi, an elfin species descended from man. But he soon realises that they are simply remnants of a once-great culture - now weak and living in terror of the sinister Morlocks lurking in the deep tunnels, who threaten his very return home. H. G. Wells defined much of modern science fiction with this 1895 tale of time travel, which questions humanity, society, and our place on Earth.

Part of a series of vintage recordings taken from the Penguin Archives. Affordable, collectable, quality productions - perfect for on-the-go listening.

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ashishg | 2/20/2014

    " Story of time travel and imagination of future world. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gsvg | 2/13/2014

    " A great commentary on the inevitable fruitlessness of todays social order. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ryan Splenda | 2/6/2014

    " Wells is truly the master of science fiction. He takes us to a strange and mystifying world that alludes to the baseness of human nature. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Samantha | 2/2/2014

    " Even though it was written over 100 years ago, The Time Machine is amazingly relevant, though-provoking, and even exciting. Unlike the classics with pages of useless rambling, this book is short enough to maintain brevity and is filled with enough plot to hold my attention from page 1. Wells's rumination on the fate of humanity was captivating enough that I didn't fall asleep (it was actually quite clever - the way he worked his theorizing into the plot without making it boring). The idea and mechanics of the actual machine are still futuristic by today's standards, making Wells and absolute genius. And for those people who just have trouble with old books because of the out-dated language, you should know that The Time Machine is incredibly still quite readable and definitely worth it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Allie | 2/1/2014

    " This type of scientific fantasy is not my favorite genre, but Wells's story is a creative, thought-provoking, quick read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tim Mccoy | 1/16/2014

    " Loved it. Probably could have been longer, but it was a fun and easy read. Looking to compare it to the movie I watched 10 years ago. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Al | 1/4/2014

    " H.G. Wells's classic novel The Time Machine, first published in 1895, is one part fairy tale, one part love story, one part science fiction, and one part utopia. Readers can enjoy the story on multiple levels and take away something unique to themselves upon finishing the novel. With every turn of the page, we become as little children being read a good night story; for in effect, we are being read to rather than reading ourselves. The story is told through an unnamed narrator, a young member of an informal group of men who meet occasionally at the Time Traveler's house for dinner, drinks, cigars, and conversation. It is no accident that the narrator who tells us the story is the least skeptical, indeed the most credulous of the group, in response to the Time Traveler's claim to have built a Time Machine. We need an optimistic and trusting narrator, for he represents the audacity of hope, the possibility of human endeavor leading to improvement and progress, at a time when the specter of social Darwinism and scientific fatalism had fallen over the western world. The narrator is the one who exclaims, in response to the prospect of traveling into the future, "To discover a society erected on a strictly communistic basis." As humorous and naïve as such a statement sounds to us today, communism was a synonym for utopia in the late nineteenth century. And so we are supposed to identify with the narrator, to suspend our disbelief in the absurd hypothesis of time as the fourth dimension and the fantastical invention of a time machine. During the time when we submit to the power of the story and allow ourselves to be swept away by the fantasy, time machine does exist and time travel is possible. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Keli | 12/28/2013

    " If this hadn't been assigned for class I probably wouldn't have bothered reading passed the first twenty-odd pages. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Neil | 12/28/2013

    " I'm really not one for sci-fi books but I enjoyed this one. It was a pretty fun read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Johnny | 12/21/2013

    " 4 stars for story content. 5 stars overall because of the epilogue. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tom Wood | 12/21/2013

    " A fascinating vision of the future... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Andy Purificasion | 12/20/2013

    " Easy read, the 'Good Scientist' rules! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Stacy Bender | 12/12/2013

    " Good book with a haunting ending "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 John Price | 11/30/2013

    " Good engaging book about time travel. I enjoyed it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sandy | 11/28/2013

    " I have re read this book and watched the best rendition of the original 1960 movie several times. I am still totally befuddled how in 1895 this man could have anticipated so much detail of his or our future. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ed | 10/19/2013

    " Interesting short read. I prefer the movie than the book but it was still enjoyable. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mike Thomas | 8/10/2013

    " Classic literature .... Love it! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Carmen | 8/9/2013

    " It's a classic and-can you guess?- I had to read it for school. If you're a fan of sci-fi and the thought of time traveling this is the book for you! It's not that it was poorly written, I just wasn't interested in all of the details he gave. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 David Merrill | 7/28/2013

    " I'm sure I must have read this book before, but I decided to read it in preparation for reading K.W. Jeter's Morlock Night. I have to admit, I remembered very little of the book, so it's good I read it before reading Morlock Night. I quite enjoyed it this time around, though. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Alex | 6/23/2013

    " Easy read, entertaining, though not too detailed of a plot. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Matt Randall | 6/18/2013

    " This book is an absolute classic. I really enjoyed the imagination and imagery throughout the entire story. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nicole Bliss | 3/24/2013

    " Pretty good for a free e-book. Interesting perspective on what our world will look like thousands of years into the future. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Swati | 8/27/2012

    " Loved it. Beautiful read cover to cover. Short crisp n very futuristic. He wrote it more than 117 years ago!! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Priscilla | 5/14/2012

    " The beginning was fascinating, with its discussion on the nature of time, and I enjoyed this book more than other Wells novels. However, the story itself was rather horrific. "

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About the Author

H. G. Wells (1866–1946), born in Bromley, Kent, England, was apprenticed to a drygoodsman and a druggist before he made his way to the Royal College of Science where he studied biology. Known as the father of science fiction, he was also a prolific writer in other genres, including contemporary novels, history, and social commentary. As a spokesman for progress and peace, his middle period novels (1900–1920) were more realistic and covered lower-middle-class life, suffrage, and the emergence of feminist ideals that pushed against the limits set by male-dominated society.

About the Narrator

Brian Cox is an Emmy Award–winning actor known for his work with the Royal Shakespeare Company. His first big film break was as Dr. Hannibal Lecter in Manhunter. His other film credits include The CorruptorThe Ring, and X2. He was awarded Commander of the Order of the British Empire in the 2003 Queen’s New Year’s Honors List for his accomplishments in theater, film, and television.