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Download The Teahouse Fire Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The Teahouse Fire Audiobook, by Ellis Avery Click for printable size audiobook cover
3.13 out of 53.13 out of 53.13 out of 53.13 out of 53.13 out of 5 3.13 (31 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Ellis Avery Narrator: Barbara Caruso Publisher: Highbridge Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: December 2006 ISBN: 9781598874877
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The fates of two women <#150> one Japanese, one American <#150> become entwined in this sweeping novel of 19th-century Japan on the cusp of radical change as it begins to accept Western ways. The venerable tea ceremony is at the center of a tale of frie Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Mindy | 2/17/2014

    " The beginning was slow, but things picked up towards the middle. I did enjoy the ending. Everthing came full circle wihtout being too neat about it. The temae (tea ceremony) as described was very interesting although I kept thinking of the tea ceremony in Karate Kid. :) This did make me want to experience the real temae as a fascinating aspect of Japanese culture. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Lara | 2/13/2014

    " I'm lost. Over 100 pages in, I've completely lost the story line. No amount of effort has helped me make heads or tails of the plot and characters. How disappointing! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bree | 2/9/2014

    " Written by a classmate of mine from the 'Mawr. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rdonn | 1/28/2014

    " I really wanted to like this book, and could admire some lovely writing. However, it left me cold. I couldn't become interested in the people. The tea ceremony is fascinating, but I truly couldn't tell you much about it. I needed a glossary of Japanese words in the back, and a list of characters, and even a family tree would have helped keep the different people straight. If it hadn't been a book club book, I would have probably given up after 100 page, but I persisted. Our group was divided with those who found it interesting and well written, and two others, like me, who were really bored with it. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Caroline | 1/24/2014

    " This is a strange book. I read it as an audio book and found it hard to follow all of the Japanese characters' names. At times I liked it; at times I did not. I recommend if you read it not doing the audio. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tina Way | 1/20/2014

    " I really enjoyed this book. I learned so much about the art of Japanese tea ceremony, too. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Liz Neale | 1/18/2014

    " The story of two lives that intersect in Japan. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 jillbertini | 12/30/2013

    " Very well written, but a little slow-paced. Enchanting and full of details about Japanese society. Nice historical novel. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chris | 12/15/2013

    " This intricate book was very detail oriented and not for everyone but I enjoyed this very well written tale of family, loss and love. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Faith | 11/19/2013

    " Winner of a 2008 Stonewall Book Award. Sumptuous and complex. But one of those "post-gay" books that is only minimally about lesbianism, even though it's the coming-of-age story of a lesbian. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rene | 7/25/2013

    " took forever to get into, but once the story finally caught my interest, i was hooked. great characters. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sayuri | 5/15/2013

    " In this book I was definitely surprised how much myself and the main character are alike. We both can speak Japanese, French, and English. Though I an NOT a lesbian I have very close ties with my friends. This book was ,in a way, a doorway into seeing my inner self. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Caitlin | 8/21/2012

    " Fun book to read while living in Japan! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Angeline | 2/19/2012

    " Read this book because after reading "Memoirs of a Geisha" I was a little obsessed with Japanese culture and tradition... and this book didn't dissapoint. I was lucky I stumbled across this one, one of my faves! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Suzanne | 1/23/2012

    " This was certainly a fascinating study of tea making and the Japanese tea ceremony. The story itself made for good reading although I'm not sure I liked the ending of the book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Zoe Bachelor | 9/28/2011

    " This was a lovely, fast read. I loved the historical and cultural insight into early 20th century Japan. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Schmerica | 5/15/2011

    " I'm not sure why the history and culture of Japan had to be told by a white girl, but nonetheless, pretty good. Extra points for queerness. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Hmef Ferguson | 5/1/2011

    " Interesting detail about the Japanese Tea Ceremony. But very weak character and plot development. Too bad, seemed very promising. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Marianne | 4/8/2011

    " This is a beautiful story, focused around the traditions of the Japanese tea ceremony. It is the story of a young French/American girl who finds herself orphaned and alone in Japan, and how her life unfolds. I highly recommend this book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cara | 3/19/2011

    " I found this to be a much better story, and a much better written book, than Memoirs of a Geisha. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Tina | 3/14/2011

    " This one was interesting until the end. It felt like the author ran of his alloted pages and had to wrap it up quickly. The epilogue felt forced. Until that, the detail was amazing. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Mona | 3/7/2011

    " The best thing about this book is that it ended. I enjoyed learning about tea ceremony in Japan but really, the whole book was one tea party after another.
    "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Olivia | 2/6/2011

    " This book started off strong and wandered in and out of a solid plot. Several sections lacked focus, but overall gave an excellent (and I think accurate) feeling for Japan. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gnoe | 1/13/2011

    " My favourite read of 2008! Loved all (many) details and wish I could live according to the seasons like the Japanese (used to) do. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Emmi | 1/6/2011

    " The ending wrapped up a little too neatly but it was a good read. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Hmef | 12/30/2010

    " Interesting detail about the Japanese Tea Ceremony. But very weak character and plot development. Too bad, seemed very promising. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dodi | 12/27/2010

    " It dragged a bit at times, but it's a fascinating look into Japan in the late 1800s as seen by an american girl who is orphaned by a fire and then "adopted" by a tea family. Takes place from when she is a nine year old to when she returns to New York as an adult. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rene | 11/29/2010

    " took forever to get into, but once the story finally caught my interest, i was hooked. great characters. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Kimberly | 11/21/2010

    " I was hoping for something along the lines of Memoirs of a Geisha but this fell very short. I didn't even finish it. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Alison | 10/29/2010

    " I got about 3/4 the way through this and it was due back at the library...I really didn't like it, so I didn't finish it. I was confused for most of the book and didn't care about anything that was going on. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Erin | 9/23/2010

    " I really loved the detail in this book. It moved slowly, but the characters and culture were fascinating to me. "

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About the Author

Ellis Avery is the author of the novel The Teahouse Fire and the award-winning book The Smoke Week: September 11-21, 2001.

About the Narrator

Barbara Caruso is an accomplished actress and critically acclaimed audiobook narrator. A graduate of London’s prestigious Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, she was a featured player in the Royal Shakespeare Company. She has played starring roles on Broadway and in theaters across the country. She won the Alexander Scourby Reader of the Year Award for her performances of young adult fiction, and has more than one hundred audiobook narrations to her credit.