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Download The Last Nude Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The Last Nude Audiobook, by Ellis Avery Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (3,517 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Ellis Avery Narrator: Thérèse Plummer, Barbara Caruso Publisher: Highbridge Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: January 2012 ISBN: 9781611744569
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In 1927 Paris, destitute young American Rafaela Fano gets into the car of a dazzling stranger, the Art Deco painter Tamara de Lempicka. Rafaela agrees to model for Tamara and the two become lovers, while Rafaela inspires Tamara's most accomplished and pr Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • A 2013 Lambda Literary Award Finalist for Lesbian General Fiction

Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Deanna | 2/15/2014

    " The Last Nude is an unconventional love story. It takes place in 1927 Paris and is a story of love, betrayal and regret based on real life artist Tamara de Lempicka. I was a bit dismayed see that the author used the same lost suitcase full of writing that was used in The Paris Wife by Paula McLain for her down of his luck, novelist, Anson. I love the prose and lyrical imagery used by Ellis Avery. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dawn Kunda | 2/11/2014

    " A very contemporary agenda set in the 1920's. A graphic description of the relation between an artist on her way to fame and the woman who posed for the artist's most famous portrait. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Helen Albert | 2/8/2014

    " Amazing portrait of the Art Deco artist, Tamara de Lempicka, famously known for her bohemian lifestyle and affairs with both men and women. The story centers around her relationship with her model, Rafaela, who sat for some of Lempicka's most famous nude paintings including the one shown on the cover of the book. I'm always wary of writers who are academics (Avery teaches writing at Columbia U). Their writing is often self-conscious. But Avery does not disappoint. Her writing is fresh, even startling at times. The novel is told in the first person from Rafaela's point of view. Clearly, the balance of power in the relationship is tilted in favor of Lampicka, who is model's senior by more than a decade, world-weary and smart as hell. In this novel, as apparently in life, Lampicka was a great manipulator, double- and triple crossing everyone including poor Rafaela who's desperately in love with her. The scenes of 1920s Paris are wonderfully drawn. The experiences of artist and model are described in such detail, you can practically smell the turpentine and feel the muscle cramps from holding a pose too long. A slow start in the beginning, but this novel is worth your time. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Idra | 2/4/2014

    " I don't usually read historical fiction but I'm such a fan of Ellis Avery and this novel rocks. So beautifully written. So fascinating. And subversive in a way I wish more contemporary works of fictions would be. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Linda | 2/1/2014

    " I found the book very disappointing. There are so few highly celebrated female painters (e.g. Georgia O'Keeffe, Emily Carr, Frida Kahlo). I was hoping it would be more of a celebration of Tamara de Lempicka rather than a skewering. She is not a favorite painter of mine, but there is no way not to appreciate the art deco style and her mastery of painting for the male gaze. The judgmental portrayal of her as ruthless and money grubbing is simplistic. Throughout history, artists sought out wealthy patrons and prostrated their work before them - Mozart, Bach, Michelangelo. Sometimes the patrons were dukes, other times bishops and in her case a baron. De Lempicka was no different, yet this books seems to judge her harshly because she was good at manipulating the feelings of others, as do all great artists. That is the point of art. She was self centered - but, again, is anyone who stares at their own work for hours at a time or plays the same piece of music over and over again capable of not being self centered? I was hoping for an imaginary romp through one of my favorite time periods, Paris in the 20's, filled with amazing artists pushing boundaries and living free of many social inhibitions. Oh well. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Walter Williams | 1/30/2014

    " I was disappointed that the author changed POV so late in the story, otherwise good. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kristen | 1/17/2014

    " Interesting topic -- it's s a fictional work based inspired by an actual artist (Tamara de Lempicka) but the characters were so unlikable it was difficult to enjoy the book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joe | 1/14/2014

    " A good story from a perspective I don't often get. Great artists are often total shits, and like the protagonist Rafaella, I was surprised that this was so, because we both assumed that it would be different for women. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Julia Mcconnell | 12/18/2013

    " Great lesbian historical love story. A read-alike for Tipping the Velvet. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Wendy Lu | 12/14/2013

    " I'm enjoying this theme of freedom in the books I've been picking up lately. Freedom to make mistakes, and how beautiful that is. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Paula | 11/19/2013

    " I don't read much literary fiction because I like plot with my characterization, but this novel has both and the prose is lovely to boot. Unlike many other reviewers I thought the switch to Tamara's point of view at the end made for a more compelling story (even as I enjoyed Rafaela's voice). "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jo | 11/13/2013

    " It started off well,but then started to taper off towards the end. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Heather Doherty | 11/1/2013

    " Warning. This book has a sucky ending! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Melinda | 10/31/2013

    " The book seemed to morph throughout, starting as a very romantic novel, becoming more of a fast-reading story with familiar characters, ending in quite a different, more serious tone and manner than I expected, but satisfying nonetheless. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Beth | 4/7/2013

    " Overall I liked the book. The first part was much better than the second, which was disjointed and confusing. I liked reading about the techniques used by the artist and life in Paris in the 20s. Though I think this was a bit stilted. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Julie | 1/10/2013

    " 3 1/2 This book seems to be getting a lot of hype. It is a fictionalized story of Tamara de Lempicka, the art deco painter. It is erotic and contains somewhat of a mystery, but about half way through, I no longer cared about the characters. It was fun to read a book set in that era. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mary Nemeth | 12/22/2012

    " Set in Paris in the 20s this a personal look at the lesbian life that flourished there. Good characterizations and thought provoking look at the wild life before the war brought it all to a crashing halt. Not my favorite book but an interesting read. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kathi | 10/28/2012

    " I just could not get into this book. I do t know if it was the French or the relationships or just the flat characters, but I could not finish this one. I really tried, but it was not for me. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Natalie | 9/8/2012

    " I loved the first half but was truly disappointed by the second half "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Elizabeth | 7/18/2012

    " The steamy bits were a pleasant surprise. Overall a fun read, especially after having recently read The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas (so I was already in the early 20th century Paris art scene). I would not recommend the audiobook, which I listened to. Both narrators were pretty annoying. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Caitlin Jellybean | 7/2/2012

    " Beautiful book. Incredibly sexy (I mean, how could it not be, considering the setting?) with interesting and complicated characters. I loved it. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Amy Knutson | 5/20/2012

    " The ending of this book was phenomenal. However, you had to read 5/6th of the book to get there, and I was tempted to give up a few times. Worth the effort if you are a quick reader or have a specific interest in Paris, art, or a bit of historical fiction. Otherwise, skip. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 danielle | 2/9/2012

    " Although this raised some interesting ideas about love, agency, and art, I didn't love it, and I especially hated that Ernest Hemingway was in it with a different name and a different fate: what was that about? "

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About the Author

Ellis Avery is the author of the novel The Teahouse Fire and the award-winning book The Smoke Week: September 11-21, 2001.

About the Narrators

Thérèse Plummer is an actor, award-winning voice-over artist, and counselor. She is a four-time winner of the AudioFile Earphones Award for audio narration. She has appeared in a variety of television and film roles, and, as counselor for adolescents, she spent five years using drama therapy techniques in individual and group settings.

Barbara Caruso is an accomplished actress and critically acclaimed audiobook narrator. A graduate of London’s prestigious Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, she was a featured player in the Royal Shakespeare Company. She has played starring roles on Broadway and in theaters across the country. She won the Alexander Scourby Reader of the Year Award for her performances of young adult fiction, and has more than one hundred audiobook narrations to her credit.