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Download The Rights of Man Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample The Rights of Man (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Thomas Paine
3.47 out of 53.47 out of 53.47 out of 53.47 out of 53.47 out of 5 3.47 (17 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Thomas Paine Narrator: Bernard Mayes Publisher: Blackstone Audio, Inc. Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: February 2012 ISBN:
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Written in the late 18th century as a reply to Edmund Burke's Reflections on the Revolution in France, Thomas Paine's Rights of Man is unquestionably one of the great classics on the subject of democracy. A vindication of the French Revolution and a critique of the British system of government, it defended the dignity of the common man in all countries against those who would discard him as one of the swinish multitude.

Paine created a language of modern politics that brought important issues to the working classes. Employing direct, vehement prose, Paine defends popular rights, national independence, revolutionary war, and economic growth - all of which were considered, at the time, to be dangerous and even seditious issues. His vast influence is due in large measure to his eloquent literary style, noted for its poignant metaphors, vigor, and rational directness.

Thomas Paine (1737-1809) was a pamphleteer, revolutionary, radical, liberal, intellectual, and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. Born in Great Britain, he emigrated to America at the suggestion of Benjamin Franklin just in time to promote the American Revolution with his pamphlet Common Sense. Later, he was a great influence on the French Revolution. He wrote The Rights of Man as a guide to the ideas of the Enlightenment.

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gary Lewis | 2/17/2014

    " A book still relevant for those with a passion for the politics of change in their immediate society. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Nick | 2/6/2014

    " It is interesting to read Paine's thoughts on government and the rights of the people and then compare what he wrote with the political life of the USA today. I think the poor man must be turning in his grave. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ronald Wise | 12/29/2013

    " One of Paine's most famous publications, which got him tried in absentia in England and sentenced to death. There are some strange aspects to this book: While presenting some very convincing arguments for representative, constitution-based democracy over hereditary monarchies, much of the text is a direct attack on Edmund Burke's prior condemnation of the French Revolution. The last part of the book is strange in that it uses actual tax revenue figures in Great Britain to argue against aristcracy, and to propose then-radical means of helping the poorer classes. Eric Froner's introduction was a much appreciated summary of Paine's life and times. I finished the book in the wee hours just as the news coverage started of millions gathering in Washington, D.C., for the inaguration of Barack Obama. I believe Obama may have actually made a reference to Paine in his inagural address. This book came to my list from the Seattle Public Library's reading list "Banned Books: 585 B.C. to 2003 A.D.". "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Joe | 12/25/2013

    " I would suggest this only if you are a hardcore history or government buff. It was quite a chore to force myself through this one. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ryan | 12/22/2013

    " It is my Holy Book. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Gavin | 12/11/2013

    " Outdated tripe, IMO. For political students only. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ben | 10/23/2013

    " It was all right, but I didn't enjoy it. I understand the historical significance, but I didn't enjoy the book personally. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ralph Davis | 10/19/2013

    " Read Thomas Paine and you get a sense of what a complete failure the American experiment has been--how utterly it has failed to live up to its ideals, hue totally it has been subverted by reactionaries. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Joey | 9/18/2013

    " Robespierre couldn't get 'em; and I know why. Paine was a Copperfield from the start : he walked right through the goddamn wall of china, no joke! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Joseph | 8/26/2013

    " Paine lasted 364 pages (Common Sense, RIghts of man) before giving in to the paternalistic tendency... and thus contradicting himself, if you ask me. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Al Razi | 8/18/2013

    " Essential reading if marred somewhat by it being a response to Burke. However, in the brief periods when he addresses the principles removed from the context of Burke's writing, the brilliance of his reasoning is profound. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tim | 3/18/2013

    " Kind of skimmed the last chapter of part II where he was waffling on about taxes, but an important historical document that everyone should be familiar with. Also, it made me hate the Queen even more. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Phil | 1/7/2013

    " Outdated. Only read because it was on that 30 before 30 list I'm determined to finish "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Steve | 9/23/2012

    " Paine's position on inalienable rights played a major role in the Bill of Rights being included in the Constitution. This work is as relevant today as when it was first written. An absolute Must-Read for anyone interested in freedom. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 RK Byers | 6/7/2012

    " perhaps the most amazing thing about this treastie on freedom is that it's dedicated to my favorite slave-owner, George Washington! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Qing Wang | 5/13/2012

    " Glad to close this book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Fiona Robson | 3/8/2012

    " My Grandmother bought me this and it was very interesting - the sort of book you feel you should read but don't usually get around to! Very forward thinking and as relevent today as it was in 1791. Although I can't say I agreed with all of it. "

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About the Author
Author Thomas Paine

Thomas Paine (1737–1809) was a pamphleteer, revolutionary, radical, liberal, intellectual, and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. Born in Great Britain, he emigrated to America at the suggestion of Benjamin Franklin just in time to promote the American Revolution with his powerful, widely read pamphlet, Common Sense. Later, he was a great influence on the French Revolution. He wrote Rights of Man as a guide to the ideas of the Enlightenment. Despite an inability to speak French, he was elected to the French National Assembly in 1792. Regarded as an ally of the Girondists, he was seen with increasing disfavor by the Montagnards and in particular by Robespierre. He was arrested in Paris and imprisoned in December 1793; he was released in 1794. He became notorious with his book, The Age of Reason, which advocated deism and took issue with Christian doctrines. While in France, he also wrote a pamphlet titled Agrarian Justice, which discussed the origins of property and introduced a concept that is similar to a guaranteed minimum income. He remained in France until 1802, when he returned to America on an invitation from Thomas Jefferson, who had been elected president.

About the Narrator

Bernard Mayes is a teacher, administrator, corporate executive, broadcaster, actor, dramatist, and former international commentator on US culture. He is best known for his readings of historical classics.