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Download The Inferno of Dante Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The Inferno of Dante Audiobook, by Dante Alighieri
3.79 out of 53.79 out of 53.79 out of 53.79 out of 53.79 out of 5 3.79 (19 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Dante Alighieri Narrator: John Cleese Publisher: Phoenix Audio Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: December 1999 ISBN:
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Midway on our life's journey, I found myself in dark woods, the right road lost. To tell about those woods is hard - so tangled and rough.... So begins Dante Alighieri's epic poem of a journey through Hell. With the poet Virgil as his guide, Dante travels through the 9 circles of Hell, listening to the voices of the condemned until at last, we came forth, and once more saw the stars. Poet and essayist Robert Pinsky's translation captures the intensity and passion of the literary masterpiece, and world-renowned actor John Cleese contributes a profound and electrifying performance.

To supplement this reading of Dante's Inferno, listen to The SparkNotes Guide to Dante's Inferno. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ken | 2/17/2014

    " Favourite book of all time. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Iain | 2/16/2014

    " I didn't get it. I'm not Catholic. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Liz | 2/12/2014

    " The Inferno is absolutely incredible. I feel like anything I have to say about it is insufficient. It was difficult to read, though, so I'm glad I was made to read it for a grade; I've wanted to read it but I think on my own I would have been discouraged by the difficulty. Reading the notes in the back was helpful. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Maricarmen | 2/3/2014

    " pierdan toda esperanza aquellos que entran.... Virgilio frente a las puertas del Infierno "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Star Shyne Brite (Stargirl) | 1/20/2014

    " .... no comment. (wait never mind) it's a good discussion book, but i had to read it for school... and I just didn't like the whole concept. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Maya | 1/19/2014

    " one thing to say, i'm insulted...if i wanted to know what hell is like, i would go visit it myself. What kind of person takes a journey to hell to learn about themselves? What is meant to be learned down there? Pain? Suffering? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cristina1961 | 1/17/2014

    " I just remember when I read Dante's Inferno many years ago thinking that we are all doomed to hell no matter how we lived our lives on Earth. Where was this forgiving God that I had been taught about for so many years in Catechism. Thank goodness my perspective has changed. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Taylor | 12/2/2013

    " I've read this book at least ten times. <3 "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Brian | 11/22/2013

    " I'm sure this is a classic. I think, though, that there is just too much of Dante's contemporary Florence for me to keep up with. I need to have a history book nearby to understand who these people were. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Eric Anderson | 10/2/2013

    " Had to read it again after reading Matthew Pearl's The Dante Club. The language is just as beautiful and horrifying as I remembered, but I really want to find Longfellow's translation to see what he did with it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Andrew | 9/18/2013

    " Dante emphasizes the most important aspect of Hell in The Inferno: Retributive Justice. An easy mistake to make is to take Dante literally in his representation of Hell. I think Dante captures a better understanding of Hell in The Inferno than most modern christians. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bonitag | 2/8/2013

    " Don't read before bedtime--too depressing. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nanci Svensson | 8/16/2012

    " Dante's quest for personal revenge is entertaining and flagrant. A bit repetitive but.yeah, he gets his point across alright... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mieczyslaw Kasprzyk | 2/1/2004

    " I picked this book up in Leeds, attracted by the interesting cover. I was lucky - it was the John Ciardi translation loaded with explanatory footnotes. A gem of a book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Marianna | 8/31/2003

    " This version seems very poetic, lots of attempts at rhyming. Another version that is being read by the rest of my classmates is very straightforward, I could actually comprehend what was going on but it just didn't sound as nice as this one. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lola | 6/19/2003

    " i really don't know how to rate this one,we had to read it for school and I didn't understand anythig,but then I did and just....I don't know it doesn't feel like I read a book i don't know why,but my best guy friends loves this book and he hardly ever reads so for him I'm going to rate in 5 stars "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Don Gaoiran | 4/15/2003

    " "ABANDON EVERY HOPE, WHO ENTER HERE." "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sara | 11/14/2001

    " This is one of my all-time favorite books. The allusions Dante makes to politics, culture, and religion is unparalleled. The amount of literary analysis one can do of this book is unlimited. I strongly urge finding someone who can interpret the Italian for you. A-maz-ing. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Marija (Conquistador) | 9/8/2001

    " Ok, I've officialy given up. What's up with all those books for school that I can't stand reading??? I guess I'll never know. I think I'll try to find shorter version on Internet just to know what answers I'm going to give to my teacher... "

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About the Author
Author Dante Alighieri

Dante Alighieri (1265–1321), one of the greatest poets in the Italian language, was born in Florence and later banished from there for his political activities. His philosophical-political poem La Commedia, later called La Divina Commedia, is considered a masterpiece of world literature.

About the Narrator

John Cleese is an English actor, comedian, writer, and film producer. In the late 1960s he became a member of Monty Python, the comedy troupe responsible for the sketch show Monty Python’s Flying Circus and the four Monty Python films. In the mid-1970s, he and his first wife Connie Booth cowrote and starred in the British sitcom Fawlty Towers. He has lent his voice to many projects, including narrating C. S. Lewis’ The Screwtape Letters.