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Download The Folklore of Discworld: Legends, Myths, and Customs from the Discworld with Helpful Hints from Planet Earth Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The Folklore of Discworld: Legends, Myths, and Customs from the Discworld with Helpful Hints from Planet Earth Audiobook, by Terry Pratchett Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (696 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Terry Pratchett, Jacqueline Simpson Narrator: Michael Fenton Stevens Publisher: Penguin Random House Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: March 2014 ISBN: 9780804193436
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Terry Pratchett joins up with a leading folklorist to reveal the legends, myths and customs of Discworld, together with helpful hints from Planet Earth.

Most of us grew up having always known when to touch wood or cross our fingers, and what happens when a princess kisses a frog or a boy pulls a sword from a stone, yet sadly some of these things are beginning to be forgotten. Legends, myths, and fairy tales: Our world is made up of the stories we told ourselves about where we came from and how we got here. It is the same on Discworld, except that beings, which on Earth are creatures of the imagination—like vampires, trolls, witches, and, possibly, gods—are real, alive and in some cases, kicking on the Disc.

In The Folklore of Discworld, Terry Pratchett teams up with leading British folklorist Jacqueline Simpson to take an irreverent yet illuminating look at the living myths and folklore that are reflected, celebrated and affectionately libeled in the uniquely imaginative universe of Discworld.

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Quotes & Awards

  • “One of the most interesting and critically underrated novelists we have…The Folklore of Discworld—co-authored with the eminent folklorist Jacqueline Simpson—emphasizes his irreverence and drollery.”

    The Times

  • One of the most interesting and critically underrated novelists we have … The Folklore of Discworld — co-authored with the eminent folklorist Jacqueline Simpson — emphasizes his irreverence and drollery. The Times
  • Pratchett is, like Mark Twain or Jonathan Swift, not just a great writer but also an original thinker … funny, exciting, lighthearted and, like all the best comedy, very serious. Guardian
  • “Pratchett is, like Mark Twain or Jonathan Swift, not just a great writer but also an original thinker…funny, exciting, lighthearted and, like all the best comedy, very serious.”

    The Guardian

Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Elizabeth-Anne | 2/16/2014

    " Even to a seasoned Discworld fan there is much to discover here. The book takes the welcome approach of treating Pratchet's world as if it really exists, which avoids any problems of the "tricks" being spoiled by hearing too much about what inspired them. The accounts of folklore are fascinating - I know more than the average person about the subject, and there were still things that were new to me. Best of all, it makes you want to return to the Disc anew. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lisa Curley | 2/16/2014

    " a fun supplement to Discworld. Pratchett's co-author here is a respected folklorist, and adds great background information on the "sources" of Discworld myths and lore. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Melinda | 2/16/2014

    " For those who have read many of the Discworld books, it's obvious that Sir Pratchett has used existing folklore as a starting point for much of what goes on in the Discworld. I liked learning about Roundworld folklore, some old, some new and the discussion on how they've changed over the years. The section on the different personas of Santa Claus is a great example. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Susan | 2/12/2014

    " This was an interesting read, even if it didn't provide any really new information. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Terrance | 1/27/2014

    " An interesting look at the folklore underlying the Discworld series of books. Worth a read to get a glimpse into the traditions and characters underlying the stories. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Antti Qvickström | 1/18/2014

    " Excellent and very interesting stuff. Now only if I could remember even half of what I read I might be able to appear as somewhat smart person. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Leah | 1/14/2014

    " Definitely some interesting tidbits in this book that is really a set of essays. However, it lacks cohesion and proceeds from topic to topic. It is an interesting book but would have benefited from more cohesion. A fun take on the Discworld and folklore written in an interesting way. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Katelyn | 1/10/2014

    " Entertaining with the satire of the Discworld novels, but with insight into origins of our own worlds folklore. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Cheryl | 12/23/2013

    " Terry Pratchett explains himself and the origins of a lot of the Discworld concepts. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Maureen Rue | 12/11/2013

    " An interesting book about folklore found in Terry Pratchett's Discworld series with real world comparisons. A must-read for Discworld geeks. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Martha Z | 12/10/2013

    " A bit all over the place. Still enjoyable and chock-full with myths(or rather whispers) from our pant leg. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Josh | 12/7/2013

    " Doesn't spend enough time on any one subject to be all that interest. A shallow look at a lot of areas but nothing more substantial than a quick Google search would reveal. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Shelley | 11/28/2013

    " A great and interesting companion to any Discworld fan. The book draws many parallels between Discworld folklore and the folklore of Earth. Some of the connections are a little weak, but all in all it was a pretty good book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kimikimi | 11/3/2013

    " An interesting look at Mythology, I leaned both the myths themselves and got new insight into the diskworld series. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mike | 8/8/2013

    " It's fun as Pratchett goes through how known Folklore finds its way onto the disc. In the audio version the last hour is a recording of a discussion between Pratchett and guys favored folklorist at a public appearance. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Maddalena | 7/3/2013

    " It started out okay but it was a little boring. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Andrea Swinsco | 6/8/2013

    " Woud have preferred something a bit more in depth with more on the origins and meanings of the folklore featured (much like the science of Discworld series). But still enjoyable and informative. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Chris The Story Reading Ape | 2/14/2013

    " Did you know there were so many different versions of these "well known and commonplace" folklores? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kevin Conlon | 1/22/2013

    " An enjoyable journey through Discworld, reminding the reader of the parts of the novels that he may have recognised from somewhere else and providing insight on other aspects that had gone un-noticed. For someone that's read all of Pratchett's Discworld novels, this is a must-read "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ruth Long | 12/21/2012

    " Read as a research book, managed to spark off a thousand more plotbunnies. Highly entertaining. Want to read more Pratchett but have very few left unread! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Dana | 12/6/2012

    " This could be a good read, but if you're a mythology buff like I am, it's just a rehashing of what you probably already know. As much as I tried to finish this book, I just couldn't. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Mira | 8/24/2012

    " It was interesting reading the origin stories of Earthly legends that found their way into the Discworld, but without a pithy narrative and the denzins of Ankh Morpork driving the stories, I found it a little dull. "

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About the Author
Author Terry Pratchett

Terry Pratchett (1948–2015) was an English novelist known for his frequently comical work in the fantasy genre. He is best known for his popular and long-running Discworld series. His first novel, The Carpet People, was published in 1971, and after publishing his first Discworld novel, The Color of Magic, in 1983, he wrote two books a year on average. He was the United Kingdom’s bestselling author of the 1990s and has sold more than 55 million books worldwide. In 2001 he won the Carnegie Medal for his children’s novel The Amazing Maurice and his Educated Rodents. Pratchett was appointed Officer of the Order of the British Empire for services to literature in 1998 and was knighted in 2009.

About the Narrator

Michael Fenton Stevens is an actor and comedian, as well as a founding member of The Hee Bee Gee Bees, a pop music group. He is known for his work in television and for his voice work on BBC Radio 4.