Extended Audio Sample

Download The Fall of the House of Usher Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The Fall of the House of Usher Audiobook, by Edgar Allan Poe
3.82 out of 53.82 out of 53.82 out of 53.82 out of 53.82 out of 5 3.82 (11 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Edgar Allan Poe Narrator: Bryan Schmidt Publisher: Listener's Digest Inc. Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: August 2008 ISBN:
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Roderick Usher, the last tenant of the House of Usher line, summons his friend to come to him in his darkest need. The friend finds Usher terrified of life and his impending doom. When his sister dies, the two place her in a temporary tomb and Roderick experiences the horror he had so long anticipated. Poe, in his genius, develops one of the greatest macabre stories ever written, complete with a chilling and eerie conclusion. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lisa | 1/18/2011

    " Another great Poe, I love it when kids at school start reading Poe and they light up with understanding. Horror is a favorite, but Poe is the master. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Argothia | 12/15/2010

    " The Fall of the House of Usher is a wonderfully, fascinating and horrifying tale, in my opinion one of Edgar Allan Poe's best works. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Colin | 11/15/2010

    " A chilling story full of charecters with enough background information in such a short story. Now my reviews are getting better. :) Also I mean the real one not the short one in class
    "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Veronica | 9/18/2010

    " I really liked the spookiness of it all. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 David | 9/5/2010

    " This is simply what every writer should aspire to do, make every word count! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Abby | 8/27/2010

    " Some of the short stories were interesting but most of the book was redundant so clearly I am not a Poe fan! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 MJ | 8/24/2010

    " I love, love, loved this story. It was a little difficult to read at times and I even had to read over a couple sections more than once to fully understand what was going on. But Poe is proving to be one of my favorite writers--I love the twists he throws in at the very last minute!! :) "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Roxanne | 8/11/2010

    " don't you wonder what Poe was like at parties? "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Julie | 3/26/2010

    " liked it but didnt love it. its basically the end of an heritage immortalized in/by a house. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Amy | 3/7/2010

    " Story about a man goes to visit his creepy sick boyhood friend in his decaying mansion where he lives with his sickly sister. Someone told me this was one of Poe's best stories. It was good but I wouldn't say the best. It didn't fail to spook me out but leading up to it was very slow. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mommy | 2/23/2010

    " Very Creepy - that's why we love it! "

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About the Author
Author Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe (1809–1848) transformed the American literary landscape with his innovations in the short story genre and his haunting lyrical poetry, and he is credited with inventing American gothic horror and detective fiction. He was first published in 1827 and then began a career as a magazine writer and editor and a sharp literary critic. In 1845 the publication of his most famous poem, “The Raven,” brought him national fame.