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Extended Audio Sample The Aeneid Audiobook, by Virgil Click for printable size audiobook cover
3.77 out of 53.77 out of 53.77 out of 53.77 out of 53.77 out of 5 3.77 (82 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Virgil Narrator: Frederick Davidson Publisher: Blackstone Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: April 2011 ISBN: 9781455170173
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This enduring masterpiece tells of the epic quest of Aenas, who flees the ashes of Troy to found a new civilization: Rome. A unique hero, Aenas struggles and fights not for personal gain but for a civilization that will exist in the far future. Caught between passion and fate, his vision would change the course of the Western world.

Virgil, Rome’s greatest poet, turned a mythical legend into a national epic that would survive Rome’s collapse to become the most influential book Rome contributes to Western culture.

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Quotes & Awards

  • “The founding of Rome and the maturation of a hero who has greatness thrust upon him are the subjects of Virgil’s first-century (B.C.) epic.”

    Kirkus Reviews

  • “A sweeping epic filled with adventure and mythology, heroes and gods. There is a lot of material here for students of history, Greek and Roman mythology, ancient literature…[Davidson’s] diction and pacing are quite good.” 

    Kliatt

Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rebecca | 2/19/2014

    " A great read! Surely destined to become a classic. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Molly | 2/17/2014

    " Summer reading for my AP class and a refresher for myself. Oh Aeneas! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jeannette | 2/12/2014

    " I really liked this play. It was interesting to see the Trojan War from a different view point. Though this could easily be called the Roman version of The Odysessy, it doesn't feel like a rip off to me. I love the time spent with Dido in Carthage and how Virgil plants the beginning of the Roman society. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Hannah | 2/6/2014

    " Admittedly, I read this at high school and found it the most painfully boring book ever. I don't know if I could bring myself to read it even now, just to see if it had improved with my age... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jigme Datse | 2/6/2014

    " I read this in about 10 days. I probably could have easily read it in about 3 if it weren't for the fact that I wanted to do other stuff besides reading wonderful literature. I haven't read any other translations of The Aeneid., but I found this to be one of the best translations that I've read. It was readable, it was beautiful, it was all done in verse. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 John Yunker | 1/30/2014

    " Loved Dido. But did the latter third have to be so bloody? "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 bruce | 1/23/2014

    " i am listening to the book tape and it is phenomenal. the performance is as good as the translation. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Veronica | 1/21/2014

    " Honors Latin V! So many great jokes from this book. Any reference I hear I think of that class. Some of the stories are just so ridiculous it's fantastic. Bees in trees, flaming hair, crazy ex-girlfriends, sailing for YEARS AND YEARS, making new cities, fights, angry Goddesses, I mean you really can't get any better than that. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Hideki Kino | 1/19/2014

    " The Aeneid still remains one of my favorite books, it is a sheer classic. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Maggie | 1/19/2014

    " 5 stars for Fagles' translation. 3 stars for Fitzgerald's. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 George | 1/18/2014

    " It starts very good; there is an interesting premise; the dialogue is quite powerful even if some of the descriptions suffer from excessive mixing of metaphors. But it fizzles out a bit at the end. Shame V. never got round to finishing it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Paul | 1/18/2014

    " Virgil shows masterful use of Homeric influences, and produces possibly the most thought provoking and ambiguous ending to any work of fiction I have read. An epic in every sense. David West's prose translation is excellent and is highly recommended. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Vicki Cline | 1/13/2014

    " I'm glad I read this, but I don't know if it was enjoyable. One problem was that during the battle scenes (and also earlier in the book) hundreds of names are mentioned that I didn't recognize, so it was hard to connect with the people they referenced. And the battle scenes were quite graphic, but in a poetic way. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Gregg | 1/12/2014

    " Sorry babe, it was fun, but I got a destiny to fulfill. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Genevieve | 1/10/2014

    " Very dense and full of mythological references and language but quite a bit more of a chore to read than the Odyssey and Illiad. Will not be rereading in a hurry... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Megan | 1/10/2014

    " I love Dryden's translation. Aeneas is my hero. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Shannon Green | 1/7/2014

    " If you like the work of Homer you will ike this. Virgil's style is less blunt than Homer's and his descriptive style draws you into the story better. A great book that's not difficult to read. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Ryan | 1/5/2014

    " This didn't strike me nearly as well as Homer's Iliad and Odyssey. Perhaps it was the obvious propaganda attempting to legitimize Caesar Augustus. Maybe it was the language of either the Latin or the translation (J. W. Mackail) that was florid and obtuse. Either way, this book was much more difficult to read, especially with other things going on. I finished it, but the similarity to parts of The Iliad and The Odyssey just made it hollow. Sorry Virgil, not my scene. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rebecca | 1/4/2014

    " A great read! Surely destined to become a classic. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jo | 12/26/2013

    " The Aeneid moves much more quickly in English! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Florenceweinberg | 12/22/2013

    " As a college professor teaching classical literature in translation, I bemoaned the lack of a competent, readable, accurate translation of Virgil's Aeneid. Fagles has supplied exactly what I needed. If I'd had access to this translation, half my students would have become classicists! :) "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Anne | 12/21/2013

    " I preferred "The Odyssey" over this one, I found it a lot more difficult to understand (I actually read it in French) and I seemed just not to be getting through to it. But I'm glad I tried it anyways. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Alison Hoadley | 12/16/2013

    " My AP English 4 class is currently reading this book, I personally enjoyed the first 6 books. However, I found the remaing books 7-12 to be a little heavy for my liking. This book was one of my favorite books that we've read all year in class, but I wouldn't have picked it up to read on my own time. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Hans | 12/16/2013

    " Might need to re-read this one again as I was a bit disappointed the first time through. I could tell though that I was missing something, though I am not sure what. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Vignette-Noelle | 12/16/2013

    " Basically the Odyssey...but with Romans! Not a fan. But I recognize the social significance of the work. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Casey | 12/10/2013

    " One of my favorites, read twice in English and Latin for a college course. My college years were heavy with Classics courses so I read a lot of the major works. This is by far the best, I think, and able to keep a modern reader engaged in the story. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Theresa Abney | 12/6/2013

    " "Let me rage before I die." "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tony | 12/6/2013

    " A classic of course. Somewhat hard to read when Virgil decides to name everyone who ever lived in Greece, Troy and Italy during the course of one paragraph, but such a great epic story. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Miquixote | 12/1/2013

    " The mythology of the birth of Italy. After reading The Iliad and The Odyssey, this is written in the same style as Homer... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Erin West | 11/17/2013

    " I also own Lombardo and Mandelbaum translations. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Peregrine 12 | 11/13/2013

    " Read it for college. I understand it's important, but this isn't most people's idea of a sit-down-and-read-it-all novel. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Paige | 11/3/2013

    " Virgil did exactly was he intended to do, which was to follow in Homer's footsteps, and failed miserably. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Steven Salaita | 10/31/2013

    " I haven't read The Aeneid in many years (decades?), but when I was in college I loved it, so I rate it based on that memory. If there wasn't so much great shit left to read, I'd love to revisit it. In fact, it sounds like a good idea to start a "revisit" stack--I'll put this one near the top. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mark Adderley | 9/28/2013

    " It's a great poem, of course; this translation is good, but a little tough to read. I prefer the Robert Fagles translation, The Aeneid. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mbreaden | 9/27/2013

    " I didn't expect it to be so fun to read this, but it is! Also, I'm really interested in figuring out which god is which. Also, it's a nice break to read something so fantastical and imaginative. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Douglas Wilson | 9/22/2013

    " Great. Also read in March of 1982. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Dlynn | 8/22/2013

    " always read lombardo translations. he's the best. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Morgan | 5/9/2013

    " I read the Fagles translation which I hear is not the most faithful, but it was VERY easy to get through. Virgil's epic poem still has a breathless, break-neck pace. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Frank Napolitano | 1/16/2013

    " Almost all the way through. It's been fun, but it's a tough read when you don't know much about ancient Rome. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Robby | 11/16/2012

    " This ancient epic starts a little slow, but just keep going through book 5 and you'll never put it down. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Peter Giordano | 10/23/2012

    " Virgil leaves his mark after Homer with this masterpiece. He adds to Homer's plot on the Trojans outstandingly. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ivan | 10/12/2012

    " Ini buku penting dan baik untuk dibaca. Cuma kayaknya musti ada metode tersendiri untuk membacanya... Ini buku fungsional banget. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Anne | 8/2/2012

    " I preferred "The Odyssey" over this one, I found it a lot more difficult to understand (I actually read it in French) and I seemed just not to be getting through to it. But I'm glad I tried it anyways. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tajma | 7/22/2012

    " Haven't read this since high school! I'd probably better read it again... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Danny Bennett | 6/27/2012

    " I actually liked this book better than the Odyssey. I loved the story between Aeneas and Dido. The choice that Aeneas has to make is awesome and heartbreaking. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Morgan | 5/10/2012

    " I read the Fagles translation which I hear is not the most faithful, but it was VERY easy to get through. Virgil's epic poem still has a breathless, break-neck pace. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Christine | 4/10/2012

    " I think I'm rating my professor the four stars versus the actual epic... "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Emily | 3/17/2012

    " Not sure why, but I just wasn't enjoying listening to this one. Odd for something that's supposed to be read aloud! Maybe the narrator? "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Rowan Ashton | 1/31/2012

    " Interesting, and the language is beautiful, but there is a lot of bad stuff in it, so I don't know whether I can really recommend it in good conscience. If you can find a cleaned-up version, it would probably be a really good book, albeit a little antiquated. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kenzie Pratt | 1/22/2012

    " Although it is an enjoyable story, The Aeneid is more than a tale of heroic deeds and destiny. Anyone who thinks Virgil is simply ripping off Homer, is not getting the point! This book is full of hidden treasures. Also, this translation is fantastic! Read it slowly and savor it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lillian Angelovic | 1/20/2012

    " Read in college. Loved it. Going to have to go back and read it again one of these days. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sean | 8/19/2011

    " Well, it was more interesting than The Iliad, that's for sure. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kiri Dawn | 6/1/2011

    " I never managed to get into this story, which is a shame since it's such an epic and classic tale. I found Homer a more enjoyable read; this seemed choppy in comparison and I had trouble following the plot in some sections. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lavinia | 5/5/2011

    " I read this in High School when I found out that one of the main characters was named "Lavinia." I didn't really take my time and I skimmed a lot of it, but later in college I took an Honors Humanities class and we studied it and I really came to like it a lot - and not just because of my name. :) "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Hannah | 5/1/2011

    " we had really great class discussions over this book... but i still didn't like reading it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Vicki | 4/13/2011

    " One college book down, two to go. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Joshua | 4/2/2011

    " A classic. Naturally it is murder trying to get through this monster, but not as bad as Moby Dick. The only prerequisite is to enjoy the classics and long winded hyperbole. I would suggest the Odyssey as a warm up. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Guy | 3/9/2011

    " Dude a guy kills another guy with a spear through a shield that's bigger than his entire body and ridiculously thick, like it spends a whole page describing how impenetrable this shield is and then the spear goes right through it.

    This book is nuts. And it's awesome. Vergil rules. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Robby | 3/2/2011

    " This ancient epic starts a little slow, but just keep going through book 5 and you'll never put it down. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Andy | 2/27/2011

    " My favorite ancient text. Virgil's Latin is clear and beautiful, and the battle scenes are epic and gory (e.g.: the deaths of Pandarus and Turnus). "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rebecca | 2/20/2011

    " A great read! Surely destined to become a classic. "

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About the Author
Author Virgil

Virgil (70–19 BC), regarded as the greatest Roman poet, was born in a small village near Mantua in Northern Italy and attended school at Cremona, Milan, and Rome, where he studied mathematics, medicine, and rhetoric. He devoted his life, from 30 to 19 BC, to the composition of The Aeneid, the national epic of Rome.

About the Narrator

Frederick Davidson (1932–2005), also known as David Case, was one of the most prolific readers in the audiobook industry, recording more than eight hundred audiobooks in his lifetime, including over two hundred for Blackstone Audio. Born in London, he trained at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art and performed for many years in radio plays for the British Broadcasting Company before coming to America in 1976. He received AudioFile’s Golden Voice Award and numerous Earphones Awards and was nominated for a Grammy for his readings.