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Download SuperFreakonomics: Global Cooling, Patriotic Prostitutes, and Why Suicide Bombers Should Buy Life Insurance Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample SuperFreakonomics: Global Cooling, Patriotic Prostitutes, and Why Suicide Bombers Should Buy Life Insurance Audiobook, by Steven D. Levitt Click for printable size audiobook cover
3.0000538097288 out of 53.0000538097288 out of 53.0000538097288 out of 53.0000538097288 out of 53.0000538097288 out of 5 3.00 (37,168 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Steven D. Levitt, Stephen J. Dubner Narrator: Stephen J. Dubner Publisher: HarperCollins Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: October 2009 ISBN: 9780061967290
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The New York Times bestselling Freakonomics was a worldwide sensation, selling more than four million copies in thirty-five languages and changing the way we look at the world. Now Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner return with Superfreakonomics, and fans and newcomers alike will find that the freakquel is even bolder, funnier, and more surprising than the first.

SuperFreakonomics challenges the way we think all over again, exploring the hidden side of everything with such questions as:

–How is a street prostitute like a department-store Santa?

–What do hurricanes, heart attacks, and highway deaths have in common?

–Can eating kangaroo save the planet?

Levitt and Dubner mix smart thinking and great storytelling like no one else. By examining how people respond to incentives, they show the world for what it really is—good, bad, ugly, and, in the final analysis, super freaky

Freakonomics has been imitated many times over—but only now, with SuperFreakonomics, has it met its match.

Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • “Whether one agrees with the authors or not, Dubner's high-energy reading and obvious glee over some of the great ‘got-cha!’ moments make for addictive listening.”

    AudioFile

  • “A humdinger of a book: page-turning, politically incorrect and ever-so-slightly intoxicating, like a large swig of tequila.”

    Times (London)

  • “Lie back and let Levitt and Dubner's bouncy prose style carry you along from one peculiarity to the next.”

    Sunday Telegraph (London)

  • A New York Times Bestseller
  • A Publishers Weekly Bestseller
  • A USA Today Bestseller
  • A Washington Post Bestseller
  • A Wall Street Journal Bestseller

Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Maarten | 2/17/2014

    " Warning: can change your opinion about alot of things. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kevin | 2/14/2014

    " Just not very good. Over simplification of data; lots of biased assumptions; storytelling to support their correlation theories. I think they became cocky after the first book and thought they could write outlandish stuff for the general public. But then they bypassed a lot of scientific rigor and overstated studies' results. The stats in here may impress the lay person, but i couldn't get away with this stuff at my office. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Richard Devita | 2/14/2014

    " Don't wast your time. The first one was great but this was a bust. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jamie Sigal | 2/12/2014

    " I didn't find this to be anywhere near as engaging as the first one. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Primadonna | 2/12/2014

    " Very enlightening. A fun read, too. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kristin B | 2/8/2014

    " Like the first Freakonomics, this was a quick read with interesting subject matter... It did seem a little like a forced afterthought though. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Andy Martone | 1/31/2014

    " I loved the first book. But I couldn't take them seriously when they started talking up how awesome patent troll Nathan Myhrvold's company is. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jennifer | 1/28/2014

    " OK I think I could have been an economist if this is what you get to do... analize interesting data. I'm sad I never took an economics course in college. Anyway I didn't read the first book, I only saw the movie but this second book is very interesting. I listened to it in the car and it is perfect to do that because it is all over the place. Fair warning that the first entire section of the book is about prostitution so you have to listen by yourself... no kids allowed. The end of the book talked about global warming and I was fascinated. I also loved the section about car seats... hard to believe. It is a fun, quick, interesting book. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Ashok | 1/18/2014

    " I did not like reading this book as he has written more loop holes of India. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Carly | 1/15/2014

    " Had some interesting points. Clever writing style, but often went on unnecessary tangents. Makes for some good conversation starters. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Sherry | 1/13/2014

    " An Okay read, I think he used up all the good stuff in the first book saw how well it sold and used all the reject stuff from it to sell another book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Liz | 1/6/2014

    " Not as good as Freakonomics, but I still liked it. I did it via Audiobook, which wasn't a bad choice. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Hilary | 12/13/2013

    " Didn't love it as much as the first one--mainly due to content--but once again, these guys will make you go hmmm. The prostitution and terrorism chapters were the most interesting. Great narrative voice that engages the reader, relevant issues. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Karyn | 11/29/2013

    " If you liked the first one, you'll definitely like this one too. Again, it's a quick read and will make you laugh the way these guys look at everything through the lens of economics. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Vivek | 11/29/2013

    " Expect more fun in this book! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jennifer | 11/1/2013

    " Started out pretty good, lagged in the middle a bit. Like most sequels, it isn't nearly as fetching as the first. But it finished STRONG, and hilarious! I had planned on a 3-star rating, but the epilogue itself had me bumping this up to a 4-star! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Evan Knight | 8/22/2013

    " I thought it just wasn't as new as the first book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ricky De | 6/16/2013

    " Just like Freakonomics, I started to think more about all kinds of theories that kept me awake for months! Nice work again. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Josh | 3/24/2013

    " This book was pretty fun. I especially liked the premise that the solutions to the most intractable problems are usually the cheapest and easiest. There were several good examples of that. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 TJ | 2/16/2013

    " Very interesting and insightful. Makes one think "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ray | 7/25/2012

    " Very interesting ideas, not sure I agreed with all the conclusion or perspectives (as much as they are trying to come off as non biased, they are definitely taking sides on issues). The last chapter on global warming really, really droned on so I had to skim it. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Cathy | 7/8/2012

    " Already outdated. And most of these stories have been better told in other places. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jerry Mahn | 5/31/2012

    " Love this book - just as good as the first one. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Heather Cadena | 5/26/2012

    " This is the book I read if I needed to fall asleep quickly. It was interesting but not very fun. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Russell | 5/10/2012

    " Meh. Disappointing. Felt like there wasn't nearly so much economic insight as in the original. I learned about global warming but that wasn't why I bought the book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sara | 2/25/2012

    " This is right up my alley. I love research that is done outside of the box and the results of which are paradigm-changing. I hope they make another book together. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sonia Almeida | 2/24/2012

    " Very good book, as good as the first. Interesting insights on everyday problems, or unusual ways to look at worldwide concerns. A must read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Heather | 2/5/2012

    " Just as interesting as the first one! Love these books. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Michael | 12/21/2011

    " Sloppy and shallow. The section on climate change is almost criminally negligent. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 James | 12/10/2011

    " Not great like the first but some good analogies. The epilogue with the monkey tale was a great way to end the book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mike Rogero | 11/18/2011

    " Even more enjoyable than Freakonomics. Recommended! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 ????? | 5/24/2011

    " one of the few useful book i liked :D "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Blakely | 5/22/2011

    " I enjoyed different parts. Some sections I skipped and some I really enjoyed. Good book to just pick up and read over time. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Todd | 5/21/2011

    " Very interesting stories, easy to read and keep you attention. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Madina | 5/18/2011

    " This book had a different (creative) approach looking at economics. Excellent for those who don't understand economics, involving how the druglords make money, how names can affect people's lives, and much more. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Amy | 5/17/2011

    " The information and the connections made in this book were astounding, but I would often be very bored. Economics bores me to death, and my eyes would glaze over whenever numbers were involved. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Alicia | 5/15/2011

    " Very informative and very entertaining! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Johnrh | 5/14/2011

    " Junk economics? Random, rambling, meandering. Piques one's curiosity. Over-rated IMO. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jennifer | 5/11/2011

    " Everything made perfect sense. Who knew numbers, statistics and data could be so much fun? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Noellebastian | 5/11/2011

    " i can't believe I never read this before now. I highly enjoyed it. I'd read it again. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 lia | 5/10/2011

    " Amazing book! easy to read, and somehow the authors makes an economy book exciting to read.



    "

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About the Author
Author Steven D. Levitt

Steven D. Levitt is the Alvin H. Baum Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago, where he is also director of the Becker Center on Chicago Price Theory. In 2004 he was awarded the John Bates Clark Medal, which recognizes the most influential economist in America under the age of forty. More recently he was named one of Time magazine’s “100 People Who Shape Our World.” He received his BA from Harvard in 1989, his PhD from MIT in 1994, and has taught at the University of Chicago since 1997. He coauthored the bestselling book Freakonomics with Stephen J. Dubner.

About the Narrator

Stephen J. Dubner is an award-winning author, journalist, and radio and television personality. He is best known for his books Freakonomics and SuperFreakonomics, which have sold more than five million copies in thirty-five languages. The Freakonomics enterprise also includes an award-winning blog, a high-profile documentary film, and a public radio project called Freakonomics Radio, which Dubner hosts. He lives in New York with his family.