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Extended Audio Sample Saturday Audiobook, by Ian McEwan Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (27,837 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Ian McEwan Narrator: Steven Crossley Publisher: Recorded Books, LLC Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: July 2016 ISBN: 9781436101431
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On one ordinary day, when aggression colors the news in Iraq, aggression finds Henry as well. This masterful novel focuses on the details of our relationships, life, and love, and unforeseen violence. One of the year's ten best, according to The New Yo Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • McEwan’s intriguing examination of how we view ourselves, and how even the simplest events can snowball into complex moral dilemmas.

    Publishers Weekly

  • “A substantial work of literature by one of Britain’s greatest minds and a powerful piece of post-9/11 fiction.”

    Bookmarks

Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kristyna Vogel | 2/19/2014

    " I just couldn't get into this rather masculine meandering mess. Laboriously dense and pretentious. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jacob | 2/16/2014

    " Read for "Page to Bedside: Literature and Medicine", an elective I am taking as part of medical school. The book is very well written, with an artistic style. I felt like I was actually in Dr. Perowne's head, privy to his most mundane and most intimate thoughts. The entire book takes place on one Saturday, and even though it was a very long and eventful day I struggled with the pace of the book a bit. I have been informed that this is a literary style, sort of a pivotal "day in the life" of the principal character, but I am more accustomed to books that cover some more ground temporally speaking. Touches on some interesting topics, (view spoiler)[like the state of the world with terrorism and such, the ethics of using medical training/knowledge to gain an advantage over an adversary and possibly do them harm (emotional/physical/whatev), operating on patients that you have a history with. In my opinion, he was completely justified using whatever means he could to avoid a fight (kinda like a person with marital arts training, you know avoid fighting whenever possible) even if it did make Baxter look weak in front of his homies. Also, when Baxter invaded his home with a weapon all bets are off, and Perowne can lie, exploit, and even use violence to defend himself and his family. The guy had a knife to his wife's neck and made his daughter strip, so yeah, Perowne was justified in lying to him about a fake clinical trial and in bashing his head on the stairs. Saying he can't use his medical knowledge to his advantage is like saying a ninja shouldn't use his ninja skills to womp the punk who is trying to slice his wife's throat. Of course the ninja can karate chop. Of course the surgeon can make false medical promises. Of course the daughter can take false credit for a poem she didn't write. Anyone who says different is entitled to their opinion I suppose, but I don't see it. (hide spoiler)] Some language, some bedroom encounters. You are in the head of a male, privy to ALL of his thoughts. So not necessarily PG. More like R. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Richard Konecki | 2/10/2014

    " This was my first of Ian's books and it hooked me in just the first few pages. Reading this felt like eating a rich, heavy bread, fragrant and solid fresh from the oven. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Janet | 2/7/2014

    " I sort of enjoyed all the experiences that happened in a day, but the other six people in the book club either didn't finish it or couldn't stand it. It may have been more interesting to me because the book's main character was a neurosurgeon. Enough said. I wouldn't have read it if it was not a book club book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Carly | 2/6/2014

    " There were some really powerful moments. McEwan just hits those spaces in-between, feelings and behaviors just under the radar of awareness. Overall, this is not one of my favorites. I faded in and out of being engrossed; the comments on "these times" felt heavy-handed and pulled me out. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Frederick Bingham | 2/5/2014

    " This book chronicles a day in the life (a Saturday) of Henry Perrone, a comfortably well-off neurosurgeon living in London. He is supposed to take the day off. The day starts with him witnessing a near plane crash from his window. It goes on to his fender bender with a group of thugs and near beating. He wins a squash match against a colleague (described in great detail). He witnesses a practice session that his son, a blues musician, participates in. He cooks dinner and has an argument with his grown daughter about the impending Iraq war.One of the tough young men with whom he collided in the morning finds his house and invades it with a knife as a weapon. He holds Perrone's wife hostage and terrorizes the family. Finally Perrone manages to get him into position and pushes him down the stairs. The man is taken to the hospital, and sure enough, a while later, Perrone is called in to do surgery on him. The brain surgery is described in great detail. The book has this as the plot outline, but it is really a meditation on middle age life, family, sickness, success, and a myriad of other issues. It moves a little bit slow for my taste, but it has gotten great reviews. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Matt Kelly | 1/23/2014

    " Another brilliant book by my favourite author! Loved every second! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gerard | 1/16/2014

    " Very good, but what if you don't have this thing for senseless violence? "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lesie | 1/7/2014

    " Ian McEwan is one of the best authors of all contemporary fiction and the day he writes about in Saturday does not disappoint "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 MountainShelby | 1/7/2014

    " I love McEwan, but this one didn't work for me. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Lynda | 1/3/2014

    " Fussy, overly meticulous, tedious, and I didn't like the main character. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Barbara Clements | 12/23/2013

    " Read some time ago, found it a bit of a chore. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Patty Goldman | 12/5/2013

    " Beautiful writing as usual but I found the character a little too satisfied with himself to take. Maybe that was the point?? "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Una | 11/24/2013

    " I read McEwan like crazy but this bored the hell out of me. It's basically a real-time account of a really terrible day in the life of an upper-middle class dude who has to deal with some violence. Yeah, I know, that's the majority of McEwan's work but this is the phoned-in version. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Dora McFadden | 11/14/2013

    " I just couldn't get into this book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mrw0lf | 9/24/2013

    " After having read this book I am keen to read more of McEwan's work "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Amy Toothaker | 7/12/2013

    " Not as good as Atonement. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Catherinerobssister | 6/1/2013

    " Love the way he writes...but occasionally I think "just get on with the bloody story" too! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Gosia | 5/10/2013

    " I would have given it a better rating, but 18-pages long description of a squash game? Seriously? "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Heke | 11/5/2012

    " Beautiful and fascinating. This is a book that stayed with me after I finished it - if only there was a Sunday :) "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Dick Whittington | 9/10/2012

    " Not a book I enjoyed very much "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Nicole | 5/17/2012

    " There were moments that this book was great, but it just went on and on and still went on into every little detail and had me zoning out half the time. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Isabelle | 3/1/2012

    " Too slow, too long, and the worst part of it is that I didn't really believe in the characters. Non, merci. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lesismore | 10/11/2011

    " Very slow paced, thoughtful book. I'm glad that I read it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jane Wilson | 8/28/2011

    " Couldn't put it down, slow at times, but what a hopeful ending "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Justin | 5/29/2011

    " Couldn't get into it. It felt too contrived, the protagonist's children were parodies, and it fell into that literary trap of having non-book people simply awestruck by hearing literature read aloud. That doesn't happen. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jillian | 5/24/2011

    " Ian McKewan is one of our contemporary masters; his work is stunning at times. His craft, his sensibilities, his intellect and his strong investment in human morality bears one away on a wave of awe. This novel takes place on one very long day in 2002. Read it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Stirling | 5/24/2011

    " I love McEwan's writing, I love his craft -- but this one is a bit slow. Understand its going to be a day in the life, but 80 pages for the main character to get out of bed makes for a slow read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Leigh | 5/22/2011

    " Don't ask me what happened in this book; I read it in one night and was completely out of my mind. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Amanda | 5/12/2011

    " This was boring for the first forty-odd pages and then suddenly got riveting. Uneven but worth it in the end.
    "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Linda | 5/2/2011

    " McEwan captured contemporary thoughts, hopes and fears perfectly. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chris | 4/17/2011

    " McEwan crafts a mini-family saga, compressing it into under 300 pages and 24-hours of "real time." The sentences are beautifully crafted throughout. Four stars - not five - because in spite of its high aesthetic quality, I didn't find it as affecting as I'd hoped. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Adam | 4/11/2011

    " Among its peer-reviewed cohort, the most introspective case report I have read to date. "

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About the Author
Author Ian McEwan

Ian McEwan is a critically acclaimed author of short stories and novels for adults, as well as the children’s novel illustrated by Anthony Browne, The Daydreamer. His first published work, a collection of short stories, First Love, Last Rites, won the Somerset Maugham Award. Some of his other award-winning novels include The Child in Time, Amsterdam, and Atonement—which became a popular film.

About the Narrator

Steven Crossley, a graduate of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London, has built a career on both sides of the Atlantic as an actor and audiobook narrator, for which he has won eleven AudioFile Earphones Awards and been a nominee for the prestigious Audie Award. He is a member of the internationally renowned theater company Complicite and has appeared in numerous theater, television, film, and radio dramas.