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Extended Audio Sample Rights of Man Audiobook, by Thomas Paine
3.85 out of 53.85 out of 53.85 out of 53.85 out of 53.85 out of 5 3.85 (27 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Thomas Paine Narrator: David Rintoul Publisher: Naxos AudioBooks Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: January 2009 ISBN:
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Written in 1791 as a response to Edmund Burke's Reflections on the Revolution in France, Thomas Paine's Rights of Man is a seminal work on human freedom and equality.

Using the French Revolution and its ideals as an example, he demonstrates his belief that any government must put the inherent rights of its citizens above all else, especially politics. After its publication, Paine left England for France and was tried in his absence for libel against the crown.

Authoritatively read by David Rintoul. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Fiona Robson | 2/11/2014

    " My Grandmother bought me this and it was very interesting - the sort of book you feel you should read but don't usually get around to! Very forward thinking and as relevent today as it was in 1791. Although I can't say I agreed with all of it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Joey | 2/11/2014

    " Robespierre couldn't get 'em; and I know why. Paine was a Copperfield from the start : he walked right through the goddamn wall of china, no joke! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Searcy | 1/28/2014

    " For me it was ok but he is mostly fighting with this other writer about the French Rev. and he can't seem to focus on anything but hating him and vice versa. He makes some good points on freedom while looking at the newly formed Americas but for the most part his is belly aching and quoting his abonimable counter part. I forgot the other guys name but then again........blah, blah, blah. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sidharth | 1/26/2014

    " A great polemic on the inherent rights of human beings, and the difference between a nation and government. Besides being a very enlightening little book that clearly explains much of the philosophical basis of the United States, Paine's witty attacks on Edmund Burke's defense of British and French aristocracy make it an entertaining read as well. It is, of course, slightly chilling in retrospect to read Paine's endless praises of the French Revolution, knowing now that in just a few years it would all be undone by Napoleon. Not to mention the many more years of horror that Europe would have to endure before the Spring he envisioned would come to be. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Joseph | 1/1/2014

    " Paine lasted 364 pages (Common Sense, RIghts of man) before giving in to the paternalistic tendency... and thus contradicting himself, if you ask me. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ben | 12/15/2013

    " It was all right, but I didn't enjoy it. I understand the historical significance, but I didn't enjoy the book personally. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Joe | 11/15/2013

    " I would suggest this only if you are a hardcore history or government buff. It was quite a chore to force myself through this one. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Phil | 11/7/2013

    " Outdated. Only read because it was on that 30 before 30 list I'm determined to finish "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gary Lewis | 8/8/2013

    " A book still relevant for those with a passion for the politics of change in their immediate society. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ryan | 3/12/2013

    " It is my Holy Book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Nick | 6/4/2012

    " It is interesting to read Paine's thoughts on government and the rights of the people and then compare what he wrote with the political life of the USA today. I think the poor man must be turning in his grave. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ralph Davis | 4/15/2012

    " Read Thomas Paine and you get a sense of what a complete failure the American experiment has been--how utterly it has failed to live up to its ideals, hue totally it has been subverted by reactionaries. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Alison Holliman | 1/1/2012

    " Good for anyone looking to brush up on logical fallacies and to take a nice nap. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jane | 10/25/2011

    " What a classy (but wordy and a bit too hopeful) dude this mr Paine is. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Qing Wang | 10/6/2011

    " Glad to close this book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Al Razi | 8/26/2011

    " Essential reading if marred somewhat by it being a response to Burke. However, in the brief periods when he addresses the principles removed from the context of Burke's writing, the brilliance of his reasoning is profound. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Margaret | 5/15/2011

    " Spent an entire college semester at Michigan State Univ. on this book. Classic! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Stephen | 2/15/2011

    " This is as relevant today as it was over 200 years ago. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Karan | 12/10/2010

    " I loved this...it gave me such insight and clarity in the psyche of the founding fathers. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jhutson456 | 10/21/2010

    " I've only read Common Sense, not the rest of it, but Common Sense should be read by every American. Fantastic. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Maeghan | 8/2/2010

    " There is some common sense here mashed between the pages of diatribe. I couldn't get in to this book. Maybe it was because I had to read it for a class or maybe not. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jake | 5/8/2010

    " You can feel the power and revolutionary ideas in this book even reading it now. Great logic and satire. I can see why so many great men were influence by this. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mitchell26 | 3/1/2010

    " One of the best books ever written. It is both timeless and a timely reminder of what we really have in our freedoms and responsiblities. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 AmBizInst | 2/13/2010

    " This would be required reading if those in charge of schools were not afraid of the information it contains. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Chelseabelle | 1/24/2010

    " I read this in my Political Philosophy class. I wish I had a copy of this for home. Every American should definitely read this. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Steve | 12/31/2009

    " I always thought this was the original Common Sense, not the one penned by Glen Beck. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Raleighhunter | 10/1/2009

    " If this doesn't make you excited about being an American, not much will. "

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About the Author
Author Thomas Paine

Thomas Paine (1737–1809) was a pamphleteer, revolutionary, radical, liberal, intellectual, and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. Born in Great Britain, he emigrated to America at the suggestion of Benjamin Franklin just in time to promote the American Revolution with his pamphlet Common Sense. Later, he was a great influence on the French Revolution. He wrote Rights of Man as a guide to the ideas of the Enlightenment.

About the Narrator

David Rintoul is a stage and television actor. A former student of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London, he has worked extensively with the Royal National Theatre and the Royal Shakespeare Company. He has also appeared regularly on BBC television, starring as Mr. Darcy in the 1980 adaptation of Pride and Prejudice and as Doctor Finlay in the television series of the same name.