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Download Paris 1919: Six Months That Changed the World Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Paris 1919: Six Months That Changed the World Audiobook, by Margaret MacMillan Click for printable size audiobook cover
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (3,375 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Margaret MacMillan Narrator: Suzanne Toren Publisher: Recorded Books, LLC Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: November 2002 ISBN: 9781436147477
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Winner of the Samuel Johnson Prize, renowned historian Margaret MacMillan’s bestselling Paris 1919 is the story of six remarkable months that changed the world. At the close of WWI, between January and July of 1919, delegates from around the world converged on Paris under the auspices of peace. New countries were created, old empires were dissolved, and for six months, Paris was the center of the world. Bringing to vivid life the individuals who participated in the great Peace Conference—including Woodrow Wilson, Winston Churchill, Lawrence of Arabia, and Ho Chi Minh—Paris 1919 is a landmark work of narrative history. Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • “The history of the 1919 Paris peace talks following World War I is a blueprint of the political and social upheavals bedeviling the planet nowA wealth of colorful detail and a concentration on the strange characters many of these statesmen were keep [MacMillan’s] narrative lively.”

    New York Times Book Review

  • “Beautifully written, full of judgment and wisdom, Paris 1919 is a pleasure to read and vibrates with the passions of the early twentieth century and of ours.”

    San Francisco Chronicle

  • “For anyone interested in knowing how historic mistakes can morph into later historic problems, this brilliant book is a must-read.”

    Chicago Tribune

  • “MacMillan’s book reminds us of the main lesson learned at such a high cost in Paris in 1919: Peace is not something that can be imposed at the conference table. It can grow only from the hearts of people.”

    Los Angeles Times

  • A New York Times Bestseller
  • Recipient of the 2003 Arthur Ross Book Award Silver Medal

Listener Opinions

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Katie Hurst | 2/20/2014

    " Had to give up 3 chapters in. Too detailed, skipping around same conversation during a chapter makes it confusing. Way too much lead in about why Wilson was there. Maybe audio book would work better for material. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Matthew Dixon | 2/7/2014

    " Incredibly well researched and written book that lays out in stark terms how the decisions made by the great powers after WW1 led directly to future problems all over the world - from the Middle East to the Balkans to Asia Minor among others. The book is far from light reading though and it is long - there were certainly times that I was a bit overwhelmed - but it is amazing to live in this time and see the problems that we have and be able to see how they evolved. definitely going for something light next. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mary-Jane | 1/23/2014

    " An insightful nonfiction book about the diplomatic work amongst nations after WWII. I learned about the background to all sorts of present-day dynamics between the nations of the world. This is the sort of book that I learned so much from and wish that I could remember it all! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tiffany | 1/19/2014

    " This is definitely one of the more challenging books I've read. There's a lot of information to absorb but she does a good job at dumbing it down and even making some of the duller topics somewhat interesting. There were some days where I had no motivation to read this but I'm glad I got through it. She did a wonderful job of introducing delegates in every chapter and explaining the history of their respective nations prior to their appeals. Once again, I love how she brought life to many of the political figures, many of which I'd like to read more about. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lindsay Wolsey | 12/16/2013

    " This book is absolutely fantastic! It is amazing how the powers that be in 1919 actually set-up all of the wars to follow. I could not put this book down. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Roland Allnach | 12/14/2013

    " '1919: Six Months That Changed the World' is a fascinating, informative book that covers the history following World War I, a complicated tangle of nationalism, imperialism, political bungling, and power jockeying that has for the most part escaped the attention of common outlets for history. While the diplomatic situations leading up to WWI are pretty well known, the outcome of the war is typically summed in two ideas, the vindictive Versailles Treaty and Wilson's Points, leading to the League of Nations. MacMillan's book details to fine degree why so much of Versailles went wrong, and why so much of what came out of the conference was a product of personalities rather than Wilson's idealism (though this, too, was a product of personality). There is a wealth of post WWI history that MacMillan put into proper reference. This was not just about nationalism, but the fact- for example- that the establishment of Poland was a rather bloody affair, leading to the conclusion that though the 'big' war had ended, a rash of smaller conflicts disseminated through smaller nations and lesser known regions. Sound familiar to today's world? It most certainly does, and as with most things historical, learning the history MacMillan presents here is a great way to understand some of the messes we have witnessed and continue to witness in today's world. This is an enriching, informative read, and MacMillan's prose flows smoothly throughout. As good as this book is, if one really wants a comprehensive reference for the period, start with John Keegan's excellent 'The First World War' and follow up with MacMillan's '1919'. Together, they form a definitive set for WWI history. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chuck | 12/9/2013

    " If you want to understand World War II you need to understand what happened at the end of World War I. Paris 1919 does a great job of explaining the issues, politics and personalities surrounding the Paris "peace" conference of 1919 that formally ended the First World War and set the stage for the Second. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Christy | 11/27/2013

    " I finally finished this one. Well written and researched. Very educational. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jason | 11/17/2013

    " History the way it should be done! Theory-less, concrete and obscenely good. My new endgoal! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Dsinglet | 10/23/2013

    " A difficult book about how the world was divided up after WW1 including President Wilson's failure to start a league of Nations and Germany's embarrassment which led to world war two. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Anna | 9/17/2013

    " Oh, I'll probably read it sometime, but it hits too close to home at this precise political moment. Or something. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mr. | 5/25/2013

    " History Geek Manna "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mike Davis | 3/11/2013

    " Very interesting book. Shows how the "Big 4" (or actually Big 3), made a mess of the peace treaties and how promises made during the War that were not followed through upon made the situation even worse and led to much resentment and bitterness in the inter-war years. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kristen | 10/14/2012

    " This was really too forgiving of the four powers -- seemed too busy defending their behavior towards the Germans to really grapple with the damage done to other peoples, the Arabs for starters, and the Chinese and Japanese, all because of blatant, conscious racism. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Julia Pheifer | 3/6/2012

    " Everything I ever thought about WWI was true and these guys did not help one single bit. I was taken aback, even disgusted, by the in-fighting, the poor choices... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Daniel Lamb | 9/30/2011

    " I hope I'm not alone in this, but it would be a dream come to write something that radically alters the popular perception of such a critical human event. That is what this book did,and if the public takes heed, the world will be a better place. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Greg Boyle | 8/28/2011

    " I think this book is a very good primer for anyone wishing to learn about that era. It is amazing how many of our current world problems have their roots from this conference. I feel this book really helped me to gain an insight on world events that have taken place in my lifetime. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brent | 4/16/2011

    " If you can get through this monster you'll know more about the events leading to WWII than just about any person you'll meet- to say nothing of the looming colonial disasters in Asia and Africa. It can be a slog, however. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Steven | 3/17/2011

    " Very detail excursion into the Versaille Peace treaty negotiations "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Joel | 2/21/2011

    " excellent work--although the treatment given the settlement of middle eastern frontiers was somewhat less accessible than the remainder of the book. a fascinating read nonetheless, and a potent indicator of how diplomacy should not be conducted. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Wilson | 2/9/2011

    " Simply fascinating how Germany and the world would never be the same due to the stupidity of a few white guys. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Greg | 2/5/2011

    " I think this book is a very good primer for anyone wishing to learn about that era. It is amazing how many of our current world problems have their roots from this conference. I feel this book really helped me to gain an insight on world events that have taken place in my lifetime. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bill | 1/11/2011

    " So far, 5 star masterpiece. A complete breakdown of the peace process following WWI. MacMilan sews anecdotes throughout that make the historical figures seem palpable. Great book!! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Daniel | 1/3/2011

    " It shouldn't be possible for a work of history to be THIS good...but it is. You can read this a thousand times, and come away satisfied each and every time. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mikee | 1/2/2011

    " The very detailed story of the rearranging of the world after WWI. Fascinating. A good read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 James | 12/31/2010

    " A broad and readable look at the world situation at the end of World War I, and the flawed treaty that resulted. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Dsinglet | 12/8/2010

    " A difficult book about how the world was divided up after WW1 including President Wilson's failure to start a league of Nations and Germany's embarrassment which led to world war two. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Shad | 11/27/2010

    " She writes in a style that is full of information yet easy to read. I found this book at a sale and said "oh, why not?". I'm really glad I did. Such an interesting part of history that school made seem so boring. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Steve | 10/20/2010

    " Been awhile since I read it but recall enjoying it very much. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jennifer | 9/29/2010

    " So long! But it really opened my eyes to how complicated the Treaty of Versailles was "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Halldór | 9/25/2010

    " This vivid account of these critical global negotiations give a good insight into how important decisions were made. We are still seeing the consequences of these decisions unfolding today. The author gives live to the key characters of this drama, which make the book a very enjoyable reading. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dianne | 9/19/2010

    " One of the very best books read this year. A massiva amount of research behind it. This is a keeper to re-read periodically. "

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About the Author

Margaret MacMillan is a historian and professor at the University of Oxford, where she is Warden of St Antony’s College. She is former provost of Trinity College and professor of history at the University of Toronto and previously at Ryerson University. A leading expert on history and international relations, she is a frequent commentator in the media.

About the Narrator

Suzanne Toren has recorded over nine hundred audiobooks. She has performed on Broadway and in regional theaters in works penned by Shakespeare, Molière, and Arthur Miller. She has also appeared on Law & Order and in various soap operas. She was awarded the Narrator of the Year Award for her audiobook recordings for the Library of Congress and has earned more than two dozen Earphones Awards from AudioFile magazine.