Extended Audio Sample

Download Paradise Lost, Book IX Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Paradise Lost, Book IX (Unabridged), by John Milton
0 out of 50 out of 50 out of 50 out of 50 out of 5 0.00 (0 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: John Milton Narrator: Greg Wagland Publisher: Magpie Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date:
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Paradise Lost Book IX by John Milton is read by Greg Wagland for Magpie Audio. Satan having come past the Earth, with meditated guile returns as a mist by Night into Paradise, enters into the Serpent sleeping. Adam and Eve in the Morning go forth to their labours, which Eve proposes to divide in several places, each labouring apart: Adam consents not, alleging the danger, lest that Enemy, of whom they were forewarned, should attempt her found alone: Eve loath to be thought not circumspect or firm enough, urges her going apart, the rather desirous to make trial of her strength; Adam at last yields: The Serpent finds her alone; his subtle approach, first gazing, then speaking, with much flattery extolling Eve above all other Creatures. Eve wondering to hear the Serpent speak, asks how he attained to human speech and such understanding not till now; the Serpent answers, that by tasting of a certain Tree in the Garden he attained both to Speech and Reason, till then void of both: Eve requires him to bring her to that Tree, and finds it to be the Tree of Knowledge forbidden...

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About the Author
Author John Milton

John Milton (1608–1674) is considered to be among the most learned of all English poets. After graduating from Cambridge, Milton undertook six years of self-directed study in theology, philosophy, history, politics, literature, and science. He then spent several years writing pamphlets for the Puritan and Parliamentary causes. His incessant labors setting the typeface eventually led to blindness. His masterpiece, Paradise Lost, was composed in memory and dictated to a scribe.