Extended Audio Sample

Download Parade's End Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Parades End, by Ford Madox Ford Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (1,305 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Ford Madox Ford Narrator: Steven Crossley Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date:
Regular Price: $39.95 Download
— or —
FlexPass™ Price: $13.95$5.95$5.95 for new members!
Download learn more )

Ford Madox Ford’s tetralogy set in England during World War I is widely considered one of the best novels of the twentieth century. First published as four separate novels (Some Do Not…, No More Parades, A Man Could Stand Up, and The Last Post) between 1924 and 1928, Parade’s End explores the world of the English ruling class as it descends into the chaos of war.

Christopher Tietjens is an officer from a wealthy family who finds himself torn between his unfaithful socialite wife, Sylvia, and his suffragette mistress, Valentine. A profound portrait of one man’s internal struggles during a time of brutal world conflict, Parade’s End bears out Graham Greene’s prediction that “there is no novelist of this century more likely to live than Ford Madox Ford.”

Download and start listening now!

BK_SANS_006054

Quotes & Awards

  • “There are not many English novels which deserve to be called great: Parade’s End is one of them.” 

    W.H. Auden

  • “The terrifying story of a good man tortured, pursued, driven into revolt, and ruined as far as the world is concerned by the clever devices of a jealous and lying wife.” 

    Graham Greene

  • “Possibly the greatest 20th-century novel in English.” 

    John N. Gray

Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 by Alex | 2/20/2014

    " An astounding work of art. Ford's writing is incredible: he excels at both writing a cohesive and paced whole and delivering incredible language sentence-to-sentence. Ford is, above all, a patient writer, and the result is an incredibly controlled work that delivers its aesthetic blows neither before nor after they are appropriate but precisely when they are best suited. With Ford, it isn't so much that the events in the story give meaning to the overall situation but that the situation gives meaning to the events: the atmosphere at a particular moment - prewar, war, postwar - pours into it a new potency of meaning that may not have been otherwise observable. The result, from a reader's standpoint, is that Tietjens is not somehow microcosm for the British war experience but that the Great War is one imposing force among many parallel ones. It is this quality of the assault against Christopher, its being a multitude of aligned forces, which makes the novel so devastating. The story is tragically beautiful, and the language is written to match. Each of the central characters (and, for that matter, most of the minor characters as well) feels incredibly authentic, their concerns intimate to the reader; a character (notably, even Sylvia) never feels an emotion without both understandable motivation to do so as well as doubts or regrets concerning it. As with the greatest works of other great authors, every word of Parade's End is purposefully - and successfully - placed. It will take time and review to ascertain this novel's proper place on my bookshelf, but I feel safe in saying that it is as worthy a contender for best novel I've read as any other since Absalom. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 by Colette | 1/23/2014

    " This book is really a collection of four shorter novellas. I am giving the five star rating based on the first two books, Some Do Not and No More Parades, though the quality drops off somewhat for the other two. The quality of Madox Ford's writing is superb and the stream of consciousness strolls through the main character's thoughts are intriguing. Christopher Tietjens is a turn of the 20th century English gentlemen, with all the infuriating mindset that position implies. Despite being frustrated at the main character's lack of action towards what will make him happy, I found it refreshing to be inside the thoughts of such an intelligent mind. There is one passage in the third book where Christopher is musing on the fact that he just wants someone to talk to, and if that means he has to live with the woman he is obsessing about and to seduce her, that's a byproduct of the fact that they'll get to keep on conversing. That bit of thought seems to sum up his character, an intelligent, lonely man looking for someone who can relate to him. Tietjens' psychopathic wife adds spice throughout the books, and the third book provides a first hand account of an English officer's life in France during WWI. I really can't express my love for this book enough, other than to say it's one of the best I've read in years. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 by Kristin | 1/21/2014

    " Amazing insight into British society and the English mind around WW1. I read this for one of my MA classes (and re-read for an essay and then re-read yet again) and since have read several others books by Ford, a forgotten great hopefully coming back to the forefront with the new BBC/HBO miniseries, though I think this book is too difficult for most casual readers that will come to it from the miniseries. The time shifts are initially confusing, but when one lets yourself go (I think the confusion the reader feels is intended, it mimics the confusion the characters feel), one discovers great comic moments (the breakfast scene at the Duchemins in particular), a beautiful love story and a very sympathetic hero of the stiff upper lip variety, and one of the most despicable yet fascinating characters you're likely to encounter in literature. If you're not sure that you can commit to the full book, read Some Do Not.... This is a self-contained book in it's own right--if you finish it wanting to know what happens to the characters, then by all means read on. But it's in my mind easily the strongest of the four books--most comic and best use of modernist techniques, namely the time shift (which Ford coined). "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 by Paul McCann | 1/14/2014

    " Only read the first one and half of four novels - I understand it's downhill, but I'm actually enjoying this, which is a nice change of pace given the course reading. "

  • > Show All
Write a Review
What is FlexPass?
  • Your first audiobook is just $5.95
  • Over 90% are at or below $12.95
  • "LOVE IT" guarantee
  • No time limits or expirations