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Download Mary Barton Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Mary Barton Audiobook, by Elizabeth Gaskell
3.71 out of 53.71 out of 53.71 out of 53.71 out of 53.71 out of 5 3.71 (34 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Elizabeth Gaskell Narrator: Maggie Ollerenshaw Publisher: CSA Word Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: January 2008 ISBN:
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Mary Barton has a choice to make: either protect a member of her family or sit back and watch a terrible miscarriage of justice. Will she make the right decision in time?

Elizabeth Gaskell was born in the south of England, but became a strong advocate for the (mainly northern) working classes, and the trials and tribulations they faced daily in the factories and mills during the time of the Industrial Revolution. She was an active Unitarian, and her religious beliefs were very important to her, giving her a strong set of morals and sense of justice, which feature strongly in her stories. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jane | 2/18/2014

    " I learned so much about the history of Manchester from reading this. I 'knew' about the cotton industry and how it worked, how the workers lived in abject poverty and how children who weren't fast enough under the machines got bits of their anatomy lopped off, but it was largely a detached knowing. 'Mary Barton' made it very personal- it's a fantastic story part romance, part who-dunnit- thriller and worthy of a read by anyone with even the remotest interest in the English end of the cotton industry. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Vicki | 2/12/2014

    " I really wanted to like this book, because I like Elizabeth Gaskell, and, for the most part, I enjoyed it. While there is some heavy-handed moralization, I chalk up some of that to the time period, and simply let it go (though I have to admit that there were some rather long moralizing parts that I just simply skipped). The plot is a little melodramatic (and at times a little hard to believe), but it was entertaining. I like books that show the condition of the times, and this was certainly not a rosy picture. Overall, not as good as North and South, but worth reading. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Valerie | 2/4/2014

    " I loved the plot in this book and thought it would make a fabulous Masterpiece Theater film. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Abi | 2/2/2014

    " Elizabeth Gaskell was a bit of a hippy. Her response to the conflicts between factory owners and labourers in rapidly industralised Manchester can pretty much be summarised, "Why can't we all just try and get along?". And if things don't work out where you are, just move to Canada. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Marcene | 1/31/2014

    " This book has it all; flirtation, revenge, murder, justice, forgiveness and everlasting love. Characters among three families in different classes/ranks, struggle to accept their walks of life and the love found in and outside of their class. Fantastic ending! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Peggy Richter | 1/27/2014

    " It took me some time to get used to the Northern slang, but then I found the book suspensful and heartbreaking. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Efseine | 1/14/2014

    " Read North and South instead. It's a much more nuanced and sure-handed exploration of the same basic themes. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Heather | 1/7/2014

    " This is a very intense book. I enjoy Gaskell's style, definitely not a Jane Austen type of book, actually feels like a mix of Dickens and Charlotte Bronte. Pretty long, with a lot of twists. Somewhat depressing at the beginning, because it shows in such detail the difficulties of the very poor. Pleasing ending. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jeni | 12/27/2013

    " I always enjoy Elizabeth Gaskell! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Miranda | 12/1/2013

    " A fun listen, a very pre-women's lib heroine "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Rebecca | 11/6/2013

    " It took until the halfway point of the book for anything significant to actually happen. The entire first half of the book is one painful incident after another seasoned with mass suffering. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ashley | 10/23/2013

    " Please tell me why BBC has not made this in to a movie yet? "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Maddy Schricker | 10/23/2013

    " Dra-ma-tic. Which normally I would say is a good thing, keeping up the suspense of the story, however Mary's little epiphanic fulcrum moment regarding her love for Jem was (a little more than) slightly ridiculous. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dawn | 10/21/2013

    " Loved it, Loved it, Loved it!!!!! Why have we not read this book for Book club. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Neff | 6/28/2013

    " depressing but it left a mark on my brain so... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Karen | 4/25/2013

    " not as good as North and South, but still a very telling love story set in the manufacturing area of England. The plight of the mill workers, starvation of children, the extreme poverty of the time. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sarah Stewart | 2/14/2013

    " I really liked this book. It was beautifully written in the old style (you have to be in the mood for classical language) and had some great character reversals and suspense. It was nice to be in the hands of a master. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Melinda | 12/26/2012

    " Really enjoyed every second that I was reading this book, I almost kinda wanted to save it. I even got teary eyed towards the end! So excited to read another book of hers-I'm already a fan! This was her first book written, hmmm...which one next?! Thanks Dad for the recommendation. So fab! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lauren | 12/9/2012

    " I have to say that this book was little depressing, but good. I thought it was a bit slow at first, but it really got interesting in the middle. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Laura | 8/27/2012

    " I found Mary to be an idiot and I think the idea was done better in North and South. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Debbie | 5/5/2012

    " I enjoyed this book in spite of its depressing setting because it gave me insight to what kind of life my great great great grandmother led in England before immigrating to the United States. It also illustrated the strength and weakness of the human spirit. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bloom_inthefire | 2/15/2012

    " I cried all the way through it. It will always be apart of me. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tessa | 11/28/2011

    " Another good book by Elizabeth Gaskell. Not as good as North and South or Wives and Daughters, also by Elizabeth Gaskell, but still good all the same. A lot of suffering in this book. I don't think I've read a book where more individual deaths were specifically covered in detail than in this book. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Kristina | 8/20/2011

    " This should get no stars because 1: downer, and 2: I really hate Victorian women who faint a lot. That's just stupid and unhelpful. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jacob Aldrich | 7/11/2011

    " Nice story throughout but it kind of went south towards the end, but that's excusable, considering it's a Victorian novel. They give out happy endings like popcorn chicken at a food court. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Christie | 5/5/2011

    " The first time teaching this...and it was SO MUCH BETTER than I expected. Not that the students loved it, but the discussions were fabulous and well worth the attempt to teach a social problem novel. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jenny | 3/3/2011

    " Glad I read it but a bit melodramatic for my taste. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Debbie | 2/5/2011

    " I enjoyed this book in spite of its depressing setting because it gave me insight to what kind of life my great great great grandmother led in England before immigrating to the United States. It also illustrated the strength and weakness of the human spirit. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kerry | 1/29/2011

    " Liked it. I love the minutiae of Victorian life. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Julie | 1/6/2011

    " I'm so squeamish, I didn't like the murder part, even though it was very brief. Loved Job's character and the Christian commentary. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kami | 11/10/2010

    " I loved North and South, so thought I'd try another Elizabeth Gaskel novel. This book felt like a repeat of North and South several times, with the issues between the unions and masters in the cotton mills. The end got better, but I wouldn't read it again. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Laura | 11/8/2010

    " I found Mary to be an idiot and I think the idea was done better in North and South. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Staff Favorites | 11/4/2010

    " This is the author's first novel and the lessons that one learns about class structure and the haves and have-nots will remain vivid in the reader's mind for a long time. --Joni "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Janna | 11/1/2010

    " Gaskell is a favorite author. I thought this was a good novel. From a modern perspective the amazing recovery from near blindness was a stretch. I liked the ending. "

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About the Author
Author Elizabeth Gaskell

Elizabeth Gaskell (1810–1865) was an English novelist and short-story writer born in London and raised in Knutsford, Cheshire, which became the model for village settings in her novels. In 1832 she married William Gaskell, a Unitarian minister. Her first novel, Mary Barton, published in 1848, was immensely popular and brought her to the attention of Charles Dickens, who solicited her work for his periodical, Household Words, for which she wrote the series subsequently reprinted as Cranford.

About the Narrator

Maggie Ollerenshaw’s theater work is extensive, ranging from several Alan Ayckbourn roles, to Martha in Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? Similarly, her many television credits cover Open All Hours and The House of Eliott, to a BAFTA nomination for her performance in Last of the Summer Wine. She has written for radio and has written and performed a one-woman musical play about Vera Lynn titled Yours Sincerely.