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Extended Audio Sample Mans Search for Ultimate Meaning Audiobook, by Viktor E. Frankl Click for printable size audiobook cover
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (699 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Viktor E. Frankl Narrator: Grover Gardner Publisher: Gildan Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: February 2008 ISBN: 9781596591837
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Viktor Frankl is known to millions of listeners as a psychotherapist who has transcended his field in his search for answers to the ultimate questions of life, death, and suffering. His smash bestseller Man's Search for Meaning sold over nine million copies worldwide.

These nine essays comprise a kind of sequel to the author's foundation work of "logotherapy" Man's Search for Meaning, with a focus on a person's spiritual rather than existential striving.

Frankl offers listeners a straightforward alternative to traditional Freudian psychoanalysis as MAN'S SEARCH FOR ULTIMATE MEANING explores the sometimes unconscious basic human desire for inspiration or revelation, and illustrates how life can offer profound meaning at every turn. Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • “A truly important book.”

    Rabbi Harold Kushner

  • “Brillant! In this book, we are privileged to share the richness of Frankl’s experience and the depth of his wisdom.”

    Elizabeth Kubler-Ross, M.D.

  • “A powerful psychological exploration of the religious quest. Man’s Search for Ultimate Meaning is so treasured by psychologists and theologians and by men and women who wrestle with ultimate questions and encounter God as often in the questions as in the answer.”

    Michael Berenbaum

Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kristie | 2/19/2014

    " This is a wonderful book. It is obviously pretty sad considering it is about surviving a concentration camp, but it focuses more on the psychological effects and how to make some sense out of what happened. It was very moving. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Richard | 2/15/2014

    " One of the best books I've ever read. This book is a "game changer"; I think it's impossible to read this book and not be profoundly moved by it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Richard B | 2/14/2014

    " Meaning: "Turn suffering towards human achievement. Guilt can be used to change for the better. Transitoriness of life can be used as an incentive to take responsibility." Great book! "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Cristy | 2/12/2014

    " I thought this was the original Man's search for meaning. To my disappointment, it was a sequel to the book that only teaches about logo-therapy. So unless you are really into psychology and want to do your own personal analysis or this is for a required study, it's not very enjoyable to read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Aley Martin | 1/14/2014

    " the M"OST important read of a lifetime! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jeremy | 1/14/2014

    " This book reinforces the biblical reality the we are each created with an explicit purpose, and that we find meaning in life through the illumination and pursuit of that purpose, but from a relatively scientific and clinical perspective. It also comes from one who lived in one of the most difficult environments in history to maintain a sense of purpose - a concentration camp. A must read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Doug | 1/10/2014

    " Great book, but too much epistemology like unto Four Loves. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Douglas | 1/6/2014

    " Happiness can't be pursued, it only ensues. A beautiful book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Noelle Chaban | 1/5/2014

    " Very technical language and immersed in psychology, but overall a great insight into life from a Holocaust survivor. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Hillari | 1/2/2014

    " Would like to re-read this one. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lau. | 12/17/2013

    " Amazing book! Had to make a report about this, and i absolutely enjoyed it! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Needlefingers | 11/22/2013

    " I expected this book to be depressing due to the subject nature, and I was pleased to discover I was wrong. It was required reading for a college course, and I dreaded having to learn what this man went through. Although his experience was unimaginable, the book truly is about the human spirit. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Brandon Hobbs | 8/1/2013

    " This should be required reading for victims of ...anything "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Amy Thompson | 5/23/2013

    " One of my all time favorites! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kdevoli | 5/22/2013

    " Pretty important book here. The author was a psychiatrist who was imprisoned at Aushwitz and Dachau, and he not only lived to tell the tale but formulated an existentialist strategy for life, whioh he carried forward after he was released. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Marcia | 4/11/2013

    " This book was written for a scholar of human behavior, not a casual reader. I thoroughly enjoyed the last few pages that speak more to the lay reader. Frankl's poignant ideas are well thought out. My rating is based on the last few pages. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Steven Felicelli | 3/7/2013

    " aggregation of cliches "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Stuart Simpson | 10/16/2012

    " Stunning book, it has changed my perception on life. Can recommend this book to anyone and everyone, simply amazing. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Alena Kendall | 9/22/2012

    " Some of my favorite inspirational quotes come from this book "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sarah | 8/14/2012

    " Life changing and humbling. (like all of his books) "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Andrew M | 7/10/2012

    " great takedown of psychological determinism "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Frank Ambrosio | 2/15/2012

    " One of my top five favorite books. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lisa J.K. | 8/11/2011

    " READ AGAIN AND AGAIN! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Leanne | 5/23/2011

    " This book was so interesting to read. Viktor talks about his experiences in concentration camps in psychological terms. It has changed my view on life. I only give it 4 stars because at times the book was hard for me to read because of his terminology. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jordan | 5/22/2011

    " Profound. While I would not say that it changed my fundamental outlook on life, meaning, or suffering, I would say that it corrected my perspective back towards an outlook that I've always had. A book that I will almost certainly read again. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tristan | 5/16/2011

    " This book changed my outlook on life when I was 18 and going through some hard times and helped put my life in perspective. I recommend to anyone who questions their life, morals and values. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Craig | 5/11/2011

    " I learned a lot from this book. Victor Frankl's account of life in the concentration camp is heart-rending and deeply insightful. I recommend it to anyone. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Michelle | 5/11/2011

    " Interesting combination of memoir and standoffish observation of horrific events. Really appreciated some of the insights and conclusions but sort of an odd read overall. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 David | 5/9/2011

    " For me, Frankel's book is an exceptionally lucid, accessible exploration of existential philosophy--and this, in the setting of a Nazi concentration camp. Required reading for anyone leading an examined life.
    "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kerri | 5/9/2011

    " I have no words...

    This book put a lot in perspective for me. Everyone should read it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tara | 5/9/2011

    " Written while in a Nazi concentration camp this book beautifully explains our constant search for meaning. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Julie | 5/8/2011

    " I actually read this book a few years ago. This is another book I plan to re-read. Excellent book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dom&Karen | 5/2/2011

    " Dom: Second time I have read this book. Re-read it this time because it came up in a psych class I am taking. I think I appreciated it a lot more from this new perspective. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gary | 5/2/2011

    " THIS BOOK HELPED ME WITH FORGIVING THOSE WHO HURT ME. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Teresa | 4/29/2011

    " Reread this for the first time since college. The most compelling part, of course, is how Dr. Frankl survived the Nazis. However, the logotherapy section is also interesting. Perhaps it is better suited for a more serious student of psychology, but I appreciated what Frankl was trying to convey. "

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About the Author
Author Viktor E. Frankl

Viktor E. Frankl (1905–1997) was a professor of neurology and psychology at the University of Vienna Medical School and Distinguished Professor of Logotherapy at the US International University. He is the founder of the “Third Viennese School of Psychotherapy,” commonly known as logotherapy. During World War II, Frankl spent three years in multiple concentration camps, including Auschwitz and Dachau. Since that time, he has published numerous books and has been a visiting professor at Harvard, Duquesne, and Southern Methodist universities. He has received a number of honorary doctorate degrees from many colleges and universities, including Loyola University in Chicago, Mount Mary College, and Edgecliff College. He has been a guest lecturer at universities worldwide and served as the president of the Austrian Medical Society of Psychotherapy.

About the Narrator

Grover Gardner (a.k.a. Tom Parker) is an award-winning narrator with over eight hundred titles to his credit. Named one of the “Best Voices of the Century” and a Golden Voice by AudioFile magazine, he has won three prestigious Audie Awards, was chosen Narrator of the Year for 2005 by Publishers Weekly, and has earned thirty-seven Earphones Awards.