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Download Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer Audiobook, by C. S. Lewis Click for printable size audiobook cover
3.00145470383275 out of 53.00145470383275 out of 53.00145470383275 out of 53.00145470383275 out of 53.00145470383275 out of 5 3.00 (1,148 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: C. S. Lewis Narrator: Ralph Cosham Publisher: Blackstone Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: November 2010 ISBN: 9781455199211
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This beautifully conceived meditation on prayers and praying from beloved author and theologian C. S. Lewis was the final book he wrote.

In the form of warm, relaxed letters to a close friend, C. S. Lewis meditates on many puzzling questions concerning the intimate dialogue between man and God. He considers practical and metaphysical aspects of prayer, such as when we pray and where. He questions why we seek to inform God in our prayers if he is omniscient, whether there is an ideal form of prayer, and which of our many selves we show to God while praying. The concluding letter contains provocative thoughts about “liberal Christians,” the soul, and resurrection.

Lewis never intended for this book to instruct readers how to pray but rather wanted it to illuminate the purpose of prayer and what really happens when we take the time to communicate with our Heavenly Father.

Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • “If wit, and wisdom, style and scholarship are requisites…Mr. Lewis will be among the angels.”

    New Yorker

  • “[Lewis] is writing about a path that he had to find, and the reader feels not so much that he is listening to what C. S. Lewis has to say but that he is making his own search with a humorous, sensible friend beside him.”

    Times Literary Supplement (London)

  • “A beautifully executed and deeply moving little book.”

    Saturday Review

  • “Lewis’ device of an imaginary correspondence becomes an interesting medium as delivered by Cosham. With masterly control he gives the letters life, expertly arguing points of contention, ironing out misunderstandings, and reveling in the points of agreement. In addition, he touchingly depicts the personal dramas of each man’s life.”

    AudioFile

  • “As homey and honest as its title…Lewis is a learned man and a wise one.”

    Kirkus Reviews

Listener Opinions

  • 4.666666 out of 54.666666 out of 54.666666 out of 54.666666 out of 54.666666 out of 5 King Eli | 10/15/2016

    " I enjoy hearing the thoughts of Lewis on a variety of topics. While I don't dislike this narrator, I like his accent, but I find a lack of warmth that is somewhat of an obstacle. Not too difficult to overcome, a minor hurdle. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Suzanne | 2/19/2014

    " Questions I never thought to ask. CS Lewis provided thoughts to ponder. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Conrad | 2/13/2014

    " C.S. Lewis always challenges your thinking and makes you think outside the box too. This is one of those books that it is good to go back and revisit from time to time. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Zigforas | 2/11/2014

    " I love Lewis' mellow reflections of his later years. I love the fact that there are parts of this book I really like and parts I would press him on, if we were having coffee together. I love that this is so unlike Mere Christianity. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ian Smith | 2/8/2014

    " I love CS Lewis. But not this book. Perhaps it was the first chapter. I simply found myself disagreeing with him so often regarding my experience of worship and prayer, that it hard to read the rest of the book with an open mind. I was looking for points of disagreement, not revelation. So it's probably my error in reading, rather than his in writing. Or perhaps it's because any book on prayer written as a dialogue with another person is doomed to fail. Learning the art of sculpture from the conversation between two apprentices is less likely to inform than the conversation between the master and the apprentice. Yes, there are a few nuggets, but not enough to make we want to read this again. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sally | 2/6/2014

    " Started this a while ago, but just finished today. This book's thoughts, for me, fall into three categories: "Yes! You said that so well!" or "Mmmm, not sure about that!" or "Huh?! Maybe I'll understand this on my next reading of it." Overall, I highly recommend this book as an instrument to clarify one's own thoughts about prayer. Lewis covers many aspects of it, including who we pray for, the difficulties of prayer, methods of prayer, etc. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Miranda | 1/31/2014

    " While this book at times feels disjointed, as any book of one-sided letters might, it is certainly worth reading for insight into Lewis' thoughts on personal prayer and devotion. He is at times dull and droning, while still snarky and unexpectedly brazen, which Lewis fans have come to expect. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Steve | 1/27/2014

    " Lewis' last and worst book; but Lewis on his worst day is better than most of us on our best day. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Diane | 1/20/2014

    " C.S. Lewis' meditations on prayer, organized as a series of letters to his friend, Malcolm. It is not clear if Malcolm was a real person or not, but the book contains Lewis' wisdom and is very engaging. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kate | 1/17/2014

    " A beautiful book I think every Christian should read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Margaret | 1/16/2014

    " I thoroughly enjoyed these little glimpses into C.S. Lewis's mind. Some interesting things to think about related to prayer. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 J. Alfred | 1/11/2014

    " If one is a reader of Lewis, none of the ideas in this book will be new. Still, it is an interesting meditation on prayer, devotion, and praise. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Laura | 1/1/2014

    " Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer by C.S. Lewis (1973) "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kathie | 12/13/2013

    " Written like letters to a friend, Lewis's reflections on prayer and Heaven are soothing and prodding all at once. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 benebean | 11/21/2013

    " Probably the only useful written material I've come across on prayer-- granted I haven't read that much. It's not really instructional or even conclusive but as would be expected from correspondence, it is a discussion/conversation on prayer. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rae | 11/9/2013

    " I found this a more difficult read than most of Lewis' stuff, but it has some great insights regarding prayer and our efforts to communicate with God. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Melanie Fiore | 10/12/2013

    " A treasure trove of one man's thoughts on a difficult but simple subject, conversing with God in a meaningful way. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Read1000books | 7/2/2013

    " If you are interested in Lewis, this should be on your "to read" list. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Douglas Wilson | 5/6/2013

    " Outstanding. Read another time in July of 1999. Great. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ann | 9/16/2012

    " One of the best, most honest, books I've ever read on Prayer. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Zuzana | 1/5/2012

    " I don't pretend to understand Lewis at all times. Maybe I fail to follow more often than not. But he always provides great food for thought for sure!! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Steven Wedgeworth | 12/25/2011

    " Mostly good. Some weirds. Read it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Nick | 7/6/2011

    " Many interesting insights, often in the shape of ponderings. Some of them are very down to earth and some are very heady. It's like having a deep chat with a friend. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Steven | 6/10/2011

    " Mostly good. Some weirds. Read it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Doug | 3/21/2011

    " Some of his thoughts on purgatory are a little weird, but CS Lewis's musings on prayer are interesting and chock-full of insights. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jed | 3/9/2011

    " If one is a reader of Lewis, none of the ideas in this book will be new. Still, it is an interesting meditation on prayer, devotion, and praise. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Margaret | 2/28/2011

    " I thoroughly enjoyed these little glimpses into C.S. Lewis's mind. Some interesting things to think about related to prayer. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ryan | 1/10/2011

    " C. S. Lewis is better on almost every subject than almost anyone else on almost anything.

    My only complaint here is that I feel like it would have been a better book if we'd had Muggeridge's side of the correspondence. Plus, I wanted more. :) "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Diane | 2/5/2010

    " C.S. Lewis' meditations on prayer, organized as a series of letters to his friend, Malcolm. It is not clear if Malcolm was a real person or not, but the book contains Lewis' wisdom and is very engaging. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Wayne | 11/11/2009

    " The only question I ask myself is why it took so long to lay hold of this gem. The only questionable material, for me, was chapter 20 on praying for the dead and pergatory, otherwise nothin less than wonderfully encouraging. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Steve | 10/28/2009

    " Lewis' last and worst book; but Lewis on his worst day is better than most of us on our best day. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Zuzana | 9/15/2009

    " I don't pretend to understand Lewis at all times. Maybe I fail to follow more often than not. But he always provides great food for thought for sure!! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Nick | 6/7/2009

    " Many interesting insights, often in the shape of ponderings. Some of them are very down to earth and some are very heady. It's like having a deep chat with a friend. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Laura | 5/29/2009

    " Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer by C.S. Lewis (1973) "

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About the Author

Clive Staples Lewis (1898–1963) was one of the intellectual giants of the twentieth century and arguably the most influential Christian writer of his day. He was a fellow and tutor in English literature at Oxford University until 1954, when he was unanimously elected to the chair of Medieval and Renaissance English at Cambridge University, a position he held until his retirement. His major contributions to literary criticism, children’s literature, fantasy literature, and popular theology brought him international renown and acclaim. Lewis wrote more than thirty books, allowing him to reach a vast audience, and his works continue to attract thousands of new readers every year. His most distinguished and popular accomplishments include the Chronicles of Narnia, Out of the Silent PlanetThe Four LovesThe Screwtape Letters, and Mere Christianity.

About the Narrator

Ralph Cosham (1936–2014), a.k.a. Geoffrey Howard, was a British journalist who changed careers to become a narrator and screen and stage actor. He performed in more than one hundred professional theatrical roles, and several of his narrations were named “Audio Best of the Year” by Publishers Weekly. He won seven AudioFile Earphones Awards, and in 2013 he won the coveted Audie Award for Best Mystery Narration for his reading of Louise Penny’s The Beautiful Mystery.