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Extended Audio Sample I Heard the Owl Call My Name Audiobook, by Margaret Craven Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (2,379 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Margaret Craven Narrator: Frank Muller Publisher: Recorded Books, LLC Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: August 2015 ISBN: 9781464044311
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Amid the grandeur of the remote Pacific Northwest stands Kingcome, a village so ancient that, according to Kwakiutl myth, it was founded by the two brothers left on earth after the great flood. The Native Americans who still live there call it Quee, a place of such incredible natural richness that hunting and fishing remain primary food sources.

But the old culture of totems and potlatch is being replaces by a new culture of prefab housing and alcoholism. Kingcome’s younger generation is disenchanted and alienated from its heritage. And now, coming upriver is a young vicar, Mark Brian, on a journey of discovery that can teach him—and us—about life, death, and the transforming power of love.

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Quotes & Awards

  • “It has an epic quality…entrancing.”

    New York Times Book Review

  • “Rare and beautiful…you’ll never be the same again.”

    Seattle Times

  • “Memorable…A shining parable about the reconciliation of two cultures and two faiths.”

    Christian Science Monitor

Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Armand | 2/15/2014

    " Once you get past the beginning, you'll thank yourself, because this is one of those books that makes you really think. Although confusing at times, the author's message is sincere and may even change the way you view certain things permanently. This is a must-read and in my opinion would have been a classic if the beginning wasn't so dang confusing! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rae | 2/12/2014

    " A young Anglican missionary, fated to die shortly, is sent to the hardest perish of a remote Indian village in Canada. He is sensitive to and accepted by the locals and learns much about their myths. When an Indian sees an owl it usually indicates death is around the corner. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cynthia | 2/3/2014

    " I don't know how I grew up in Canada, on Vancouver Island and never read this book. Wonderful. I listened to half and then read half. I was a very touching and insightful read. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Victoria Escobedo | 1/29/2014

    " This book has an intriguing topic though failed to keep me interested whatsoever, the plot developed all too slowly and all too miraculously fast in the closing. There's not much substance in the plot and drags on. I read this in high school for English class and despised having to read this, it was dreaded task. The ideas and subjects of the book would have been better suited for a short story in a textbook. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Al Gritten | 1/22/2014

    " So many metaphors in this book and couple of them will probably find their way into sermons! The idea that the loss of any one diminishes the whole should be an obvious one to us, but I sometimes wonder if we really grasp that and understand the implications. By extension, then, the loss of any one culture diminishes the whole of humanity. In many ways this is a book about loss, but in others it is a book about the small victories of life and about living life together. The swimmer understands the rhythms and seasons of life and we can learn it from him if we watch. All things in their time - life is in the small victories and the relationships that grow from them. Loved this one! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Frances | 1/17/2014

    " This is one of my favourite books "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mika Yamamoto | 1/14/2014

    " I had read this in Freshman Honors English and loved it then. When I started my private library, it was one the first books I bought to have on my shelves. However, I hadn't re-read it until now. My friend had been assigned the book in her college religion class, so I picked it up again. It is a book that manages to capture al the human drama, and yet remain quiet. I think it is perfectly written, without flaw. It is a book that I wish I had written. It has been two days now since I read it, and I stil carry this wonderful feeling within me that certain books can give me. A feeling that takes me beyond the mundane, that reminds me that all that we do in life, and all that we experience in life has so much loveliness. Sometimes I forget. But a book like this reminds me that life itself... the eating, sleeping, fighting, working, surviving, hating someone, loving someone, worrying, fretting, laughing ... all this is poetry. It is a book that helps me be still inside, to not miss my life because I'm too busy thinking about something else. As always, I am so grateful when I run into books like these. They save my life. They are the reason I read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Julia | 1/10/2014

    " Beautifully written, tightly woven story. A library patron recommended it to me - a big burly sort of man who said it changed his life. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Roberta Mccaslin | 1/8/2014

    " Irreplacable. Get it, keep it, loan it to the kids. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Eva | 1/6/2014

    " This is a good book, certainly. Not new, not great, but good. I always like to read about different cultures and native American ones are no exception. To me there is great value in understanding how uniqueness of a culture and how the life philosophy in it shapes its members into who they are. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mindy | 12/24/2013

    " Interesting story. Interesting to see a man (an outsider) find his home and discover he isn't really so different from the Alaskan Indians. However, the book is a little slow. The pace of the book represents the pace of their lives. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Caroline Clifford | 12/23/2013

    " Wot can I say?? A CLASSIC "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Abbi ♪§♫☻♪♠♫♪☺ | 12/10/2013

    " I thought this book was actually fairly good. It was really touching. And the symbolism in it was great! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lily | 8/24/2013

    " This book is heart-wrenching and gorgeous. Very short but dense, does not take long to read. It is a devastating and joyous look at life, death, faith, culture, and all that is in between. Recommended to all. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jill | 6/22/2013

    " I read this in a French-Canuck lit class. Usually Native-American stories aren't my thing, but I really liked this book. It is wonderfully real and very interesting at the same time. You feel like you are reading a real account. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Fillyjonk | 4/25/2013

    " Such a lovely book. Gentle, moving and profound. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Janet Aileen | 2/26/2013

    " Margaret Craven was a writer and journalist who wrote of the plight of the First Nation peoples in British Columbia, Canada. This book followed that work. It is a charming story of a young vicar living and working in a small, isolated village....with a sad, but precious ending. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Darby | 2/14/2013

    " A touching story. I am grateful to the friend who recommended it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sharisse | 1/14/2013

    " I enjoyed this book, made you appreciate life, and also yearn a little bit for the lost way of the Native American life. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ricky Orr | 1/13/2013

    " A short read about a vicar sent to minister to an Indian village in British Columbia. He learns and comes to understand the ways of the Indians, all the while witnessing the decline of their way of life as the young people succumb to the world of the white man and outside influence. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Bk | 9/5/2012

    " Boring book...I just finished reading it with my senior class D: ehh "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Crystal Durnan | 8/9/2012

    " Amazing, beautiful, lush and heart-wrenching "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Yvensong | 5/18/2012

    " Touching, beautiful tale of life, death, and acceptance. "

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About the Author

Margaret Craven (1901–1980) was born in Montana, but her family moved to Bellingham, Washington, shortly after her birth. After finishing high school in Bellingham, Margaret went to Stanford University where she majored in history, avoiding English despite her interest and ability in writing. She wrote several novels, an autobiography, and a collection of stories.

About the Narrator

Frank Muller (1951–2008) was an Audie Award–winning narrator. A classically trained actor, Frank appeared on both television and the stage. His credits include Hamlet, The Crucible, The Taming of the Shrew, The Importance of Being Earnest, Law & Order, All My Children, and many, many more. In 1999 Frank was awarded the AudioFile Lifetime Achievement Award, the top honor in the audiobook community. He has also won twenty-three Earphones Awards.