Extended Audio Sample

Download Huckleberry Finn: Retro Audio (Dramatised) Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Huckleberry Finn: Retro Audio (Dramatised) Audiobook, by Mark Twain
3.7 out of 53.7 out of 53.7 out of 53.7 out of 53.7 out of 5 3.70 (10 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Mark Twain Narrator: Unspecified Publisher: Andrews UK Limited Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: February 2009 ISBN:
Coming Soon! We're adding audiobooks daily and hope to make this one available for download very soon. Submit your vote below to let us know you really crave this title!
Vote this up! This audiobook has 0 votes

The classic tale of Huckleberry Finn and his adventures along the Mississippi river. Join Huck as meets many people, including his friend Jim as they both struggle to gain their own type of freedom.

One of the Classic Radio Theatre productions you will want to listen to over and over again! Download and start listening now!

RT_ENTN_000019

Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Adam | 5/31/2011

    " I've read this a number of times already for school and for fun. I love it every time. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Heather | 5/31/2011

    " Too bad that whole Tom Sawyer thing had to happen... LOVED the first half of this. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 David | 5/28/2011

    " This book is a mirror of the United States that actually existed. Great read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Diana | 5/28/2011

    " It's Mark Twain--that should be enough. A classic that can captivate the child in all of us. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kodi | 5/27/2011

    " Good, got better as you got farther in the book. Got in a little slow at points, but you have to love a classic! :) "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Allegra | 5/26/2011

    " I enjoyed it. Not a favorite but it was good. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sarah | 5/26/2011

    " Love the story I'm just not a big fan of Mark Twain "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Karen | 5/25/2011

    " Fascinating study of time and place long gone. Difficult word makes teh reality work, but so glad we don't live in a country that accepts it now. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Karen | 5/25/2011

    " I'm surprised, but I really enjoyed this one. Found the text a little hard to read at times (the accents are hard to decipher sometimes) but it was still a fun book! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Patty | 5/24/2011

    " I was too young when I read this book--I liked it, but I want to go back to it. Twain is an amazing writer, and I'm sure I'd get more out of it now. "

Write a Review
What is FlexPass?
  • Your first audiobook is just $5.95
  • Over 90% are at or below $12.95
  • "LOVE IT" guarantee
  • No time limits or expirations
About the Author
Author Mark Twain

Mark Twain, pseudonym of Samuel L. Clemens (1835–1910), was born in Florida, Missouri, and grew up in Hannibal on the west bank of the Mississippi River. He attended school briefly and then at age thirteen became a full-time apprentice to a local printer. When his older brother Orion established the Hannibal Journal, Samuel became a compositor for that paper and then, for a time, an itinerant printer. With a commission to write comic travel letters, he traveled down the Mississippi. Smitten with the riverboat life, he signed on as an apprentice to a steamboat pilot. After 1859, he became a licensed pilot, but two years later the Civil War put an end to the steam-boat traffic.

In 1861, he and his brother traveled to the Nevada Territory where Samuel became a writer for the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise, and there, on February 3, 1863, he signed a humorous account with the pseudonym Mark Twain. The name was a river man’s term for water “two fathoms deep” and thus just barely safe for navigation.

In 1870 Twain married and moved with his wife to Hartford, Connecticut. He became a highly successful lecturer in the United States and England, and he continued to write.