Extended Audio Sample

Download Huckleberry Finn Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Huckleberry Finn Audiobook, by Mark Twain
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (696,607 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Mark Twain Narrator: Garrick Hagon Publisher: Naxos AudioBooks Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: October 2005 ISBN:
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Floating down the Mississippi on their raft, Huckleberry Finn and Jim, a runaway slave, find life filled with excitement and the spirit of adventure. Join Huck and Jim and their old friend Tom Sawyer as they come up against low-down thieves and murderers, whilst being chased by Huck's evil, drunken father who is after Huck's treasure. It is a trip that you will never tire of.

For excellent supplemental information about this work, don't miss The SparkNotes Guide to The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Sora | 2/9/2014

    " I liked this book better than "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer." "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lisa | 2/6/2014

    " The audio version of Huckleberry Finn was a very good performance by Elijah Wood, but I had trouble getting into the story and got frustrated with the characters. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Pixie | 2/4/2014

    " Enjoying revisiting old classics! Many underlying "lessons"! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Merle Allwood | 1/22/2014

    " Still gives the excitement at the end. Helps to have read some Tom Sawyer first. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ramie | 1/17/2014

    " By and By i reckon it's a good thing we don't speak nor act like this anymore, generally speaking. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tarkaneea | 1/17/2014

    " This was a pretty good book. Although, it is definitely not one I would willingly read on my own. I had to read this for my Advanced American Literature class, and that is the only reason it is currently on my bookshelf. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Emily Tippett | 1/15/2014

    " After I finished reading the last sentence of this book I was instantly met with the confusion of what I really took away from this story. Usually authors write books to inspire people and to make them learn something about themselves or the world around them, so that the person at least knows that reading that book wasn't just a waste of time. With The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn there was no true focus or theme of the book per say. While there are hints of the theme of how growing up is important in ones life to be able to truly be happy with oneself, as I explored that theme more I realized that I didn't think that Huck really grew up that much in the story. For instance, in the beginning of the book Huck is just as compliant to all of Tom Sawyer's demands as he is in the end of the book, he never learned to stand up for what he believes in, which could have been a potential theme Twain could have gone more in depth about. Another potential would have been that the necessity of love and care that a family would provide is critical in someone's life. As I thought about this theme even more I realized that while Huck realized that Jim actually cared about him, Huck never expressed feelings of respect and care the same way Jim did to him. Even though Huck did go to all the trouble to free Jim, did he do it out of the goodness of his heart and that he really wanted Jim to live a fair life, or one, did he do it so he wouldn't have to return Jim and confess that he helped a slave escape, or two, did he continue with his plans because Tom came along and made it seem fun and adventurous? I don't know! I really don't like that there was no one particular theme that progressed along with the story and characters, because at the end of reading the book I was left wondering what the point of reading it was... Also, while I did find Huck's innocence charming in the beginning of the book, but I eventually found myself annoyed with how Huck just let Tom step over him and how Huck never stood up to Tom by telling him that they didn't need some elaborate plan to get Jim freed, they just needed to do it and do it quickly. Overall, at the end of the book I just found myself with more questions about the theme of the book then answers. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kimberly Massey | 1/5/2014

    " I'm re-reading this as an adult, an amazed at all I overlooked while reading it as an adolescent. Well worth the second read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lea | 1/5/2014

    " Certainly an important piece for anyone interested in American literature, as there is little doubt that Huck is the quintessence of the spirit of that movement. He's forever young, rebellious and naive, yet devoid of selfishness and incapable of cruelty. Pretty rad. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Michael | 11/26/2013

    " By far and away this is Twain's best novel. It reveals so much of his own views on life and slavery as well as the views and truths that a healing nation didn't want to hear at the time and many don't want to hear now. To further understand this period of US history, this book is a must read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Damian Carter | 11/25/2013

    " Really what is there to say. American Classic "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Eddie | 10/29/2013

    " a great classic, take the time to get used to the way it was written, and remember it was a long time ago... but I enjoyed it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sabouram | 10/14/2013

    " A very good book to start at very young age. Advise your youngsters to read it to develop some values. I have read the translation as boy but want to read the English one as a man. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Helen Graham | 9/8/2013

    " I abandoned it when I was a child, but now it is one of my favourite books. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Octopusgoo | 6/25/2013

    " So many characters of so many types. Adventure on a raft, a great insight to the American south. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nolena | 4/16/2013

    " Follows the story of a southern boy and his crazy adventures with his friends. You wouldn't believe all the nutty things he does. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Carl | 12/16/2012

    " This was a very enjoyable book. The language in it is a bit rough. If you're sensitive you might want to consider a modernized version, but I felt the book gave a very good picture of what life must have been life for teenage boys in central/southern US the mid 1800s. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jeff D. | 12/2/2012

    " A slice of Americana that is equal parts fun and whimsical. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Phil Villarreal | 11/5/2012

    " Very funny, written with a convincingly immature voice, but layered with delicious sarcasm and poignant social observations. Uses the phrase "by and by" way too much though. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gayathri | 8/19/2012

    " ofcourseeee!!! its the bestttt amongst all Mark Twain's :) :) luving the character of huckleberry... but tom sawyer totally stole his thunder :) one luvly buk not matter how old yu r :) "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dan | 7/3/2012

    " I love the way Mark Twain can represent dialects in his writing, and the this particular story was very entertaining. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Carmen | 6/4/2012

    " A great American classic! Worth your time! "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Micha | 1/17/2012

    " I think I basically want to exterminate Tom Sawyer. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jason Barney | 7/25/2011

    " This is another great adventure story that students will enjoy listening to. It takes a look at the life of young adventurous kids in the past and the crazy things they would do for entertainment. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Emma | 5/22/2011

    " A thousand times better than Tom Sawyer (the character, that is). Adventures of Huckleberry Finn provides a mature look at race relations through the eyes of a young boy. This work is nothing short of great. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Steven | 5/22/2011

    " I thought it was good but not great. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Judi | 5/21/2011

    " Maybe my expectations were too high. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Markus | 5/19/2011

    " I Love Huck Finn because I love Mark Twain. Persons attempting to find pedo/homo erotic undertones in that will be shot. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Eva Anne | 5/17/2011

    " Dissected this one for English class. Sometimes, discussion takes all the charm out of a book. So do angry yet subtle attacks at Romanticism. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sam | 5/16/2011

    " Not quite as entertaining as Tom Sawyer "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Michelle | 5/15/2011

    " Read this one back in the 6th grade for an English assignment & still remember most of it to this day :) "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mike | 5/14/2011

    " I think this was the first real novel I ever read, and I decided I wanted to be a writer. I also decided I wanted to sail a raft down the Mississippi River! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Raffles | 5/14/2011

    " One of the greatest American novels. "

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About the Author
Author Mark Twain

Mark Twain, pseudonym of Samuel L. Clemens (1835–1910), was born in Florida, Missouri, and grew up in Hannibal on the west bank of the Mississippi River. He attended school briefly and then at age thirteen became a full-time apprentice to a local printer. When his older brother Orion established the Hannibal Journal, Samuel became a compositor for that paper and then, for a time, an itinerant printer. With a commission to write comic travel letters, he traveled down the Mississippi. Smitten with the riverboat life, he signed on as an apprentice to a steamboat pilot. After 1859, he became a licensed pilot, but two years later the Civil War put an end to the steam-boat traffic.

In 1861, he and his brother traveled to the Nevada Territory where Samuel became a writer for the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise, and there, on February 3, 1863, he signed a humorous account with the pseudonym Mark Twain. The name was a river man’s term for water “two fathoms deep” and thus just barely safe for navigation.

In 1870 Twain married and moved with his wife to Hartford, Connecticut. He became a highly successful lecturer in the United States and England, and he continued to write.

About the Narrator

Garrick Hagon is a London-born actor of film, stage, television, and radio who is best known for his role as Biggs Darklighter in Star Wars: A New Hope. His many films include Batman, Spy Game, Me and Orson Welles, and The Message. He was the rebel leader Ky in Doctor Who: The Mutants and played Simon Gerrard, Debbie Aldridge’s husband, in BBC’s The Archers. He has narrated numerous audiobooks and won an AudioFile Earphones Award.