Extended Audio Sample

Download How to Tell a Story and Other Essays Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample How to Tell a Story and Other Essays (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Mark Twain
3.81 out of 53.81 out of 53.81 out of 53.81 out of 53.81 out of 5 3.81 (16 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Mark Twain Narrator: Deaver Brown Publisher: Simply Magazine Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: March 2012 ISBN:
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Mark Twain's marvelous short work relating how to tell a story - an American story that is humorous, not comic as the British or witty as the French. The work also includes four marvelous but little-known essays: The Wounded Soldier, The Golden Arm, Mental Telegraphy, and The Invalid's Story. Canadian listeners will particularly enjoy Mental Telegraphy, set in Quebec.

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 John David Lionel Brooke | 9/23/2013

    " Short, punchy and stunningly simple and sure makes learing to tell a story a pleasure to read. Classic of course. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Patrick | 8/29/2013

    " Again, a quick Twain essay. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kathy Hale | 8/18/2013

    " I have always liked Mark Twain. there are some interesting tips and stories in this short volume. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Eric Durso | 7/3/2013

    " There's a short story at the end of this compilation that had me laughing out loud. Twain is golden, all the time. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Shiri | 4/25/2013

    " Nice. I think I'd actually read it once before because I had this feeling like I'd heard this somewhere. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bruno | 4/18/2013

    " I find the first part more interesting than the rest "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lindsay | 4/17/2013

    " It's always interesting to look at older writings and see how well they've stood the test of time, and this has definitely done that. Some advised on telling stories, always pertinent, and some examples as well. An entertaining and informative read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Andrew | 3/18/2013

    " brilliant and hilarious. i really enjoy his style, this is the first non-fiction i've read by him, it was quite good. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Paul | 2/8/2013

    " A series of essays by Mark Twain. My two favorites of the stories were Traveling with a Reformer and in Defense of Harriet Shelley. Overall, not the easiest read but the above two stories were worthwhile. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Karishma | 2/2/2013

    " This may have been better if I had read it as a book. Something about the formatting of the Kindle edition makes it so that all the essays run together, and you want them to make sense as a whole, which they don't do. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lea | 12/24/2012

    " Apparently this free edition was missing some of the essays from the original work, but the ones that were there were really good. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Austin James | 10/17/2012

    " It was an interesting read: Not quite what I thought it'd be. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Marlene | 9/2/2012

    " The last story was hilarious... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Elizabeth | 7/24/2012

    " Fenimore Cooper's Literary Offenses is one of the funniest book reviews ever. I don't have to read Last of the Mohicans now.... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ellen | 5/23/2012

    " A quick collection, but a good one. This should be taught in middle or high school, as it would help young writers learn how to structure a story properly as well as how to use humor effectively. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Clay | 4/1/2012

    " It was a collection of essays. It amazes me how his ideas still hold true in our modern day. "

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About the Author
Author Mark Twain

Mark Twain, pseudonym of Samuel L. Clemens (1835–1910), was born in Florida, Missouri, and grew up in Hannibal on the west bank of the Mississippi River. He attended school briefly and then at age thirteen became a full-time apprentice to a local printer. When his older brother Orion established the Hannibal Journal, Samuel became a compositor for that paper and then, for a time, an itinerant printer. With a commission to write comic travel letters, he traveled down the Mississippi. Smitten with the riverboat life, he signed on as an apprentice to a steamboat pilot. After 1859, he became a licensed pilot, but two years later the Civil War put an end to the steam-boat traffic.

In 1861, he and his brother traveled to the Nevada Territory where Samuel became a writer for the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise, and there, on February 3, 1863, he signed a humorous account with the pseudonym Mark Twain. The name was a river man’s term for water “two fathoms deep” and thus just barely safe for navigation.

In 1870 Twain married and moved with his wife to Hartford, Connecticut. He became a highly successful lecturer in the United States and England, and he continued to write.