Extended Audio Sample

Download Gilgamesh: A New English Version Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Gilgamesh: A New English Version (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Stephen Mitchell
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (29,423 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Stephen Mitchell Narrator: George Guidall Publisher: Recorded Books Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: November 2004 ISBN:
Coming Soon! We're adding audiobooks daily and hope to make this one available for download very soon. Submit your vote below to let us know you really crave this title!
Vote this up! This audiobook has 0 votes

This brilliant new treatment of the world's oldest epic is a literary event on par with Seamus Heaney's wildly popular Beowulf translation. Esteemed translator and best-selling author Stephen Mitchell energizes a heroic tale so old it predates Homer's Iliad by more than a millennium.

In the ancient city of Uruk, the tyrannical King Gilgamesh tramples citizens like a wild bull. The gods send an untamed man named Enkidu to control the ruthless king, but after fighting, Enkidu and Gilgamesh become great friends and embark on a series of adventures. They kill fearsome creatures before Enkidu succumbs to disease, leaving Gilgamesh despondent and alone. Eventually, Gilgamesh moves forward, and his quest becomes a soul-searching journey of self-discovery.

Mitchell's treatment of this extraordinary work is the finest yet, surpassing previous versions in its preservation of the wisdom and beauty of the original.

Download and start listening now!

BK_RECO_000486

Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Christine | 2/7/2014

    " My first foray into the many epics studied as an English education major... I was more intrigued by the history of it than the actual story. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Brad | 2/6/2014

    " This is a great translation. Fun playful, yet captures the deep emotion of the events. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Marcin Wrona | 2/4/2014

    " How does one review the timeless, except to say that even today, four thousand years later, we joke about the idea of women civilizing men. The past may be a different country, but maybe it's not as different as we think. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 pri | 1/22/2014

    " Really good translation - the language added so much to the story. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Katherine Alice | 1/10/2014

    " It was a decent book. The beginning provided a lot of background information on the gods and goddesses, Gilgamesh, historical aspects of the time era, and how the story was found to begin with. That part was a little boring but the story itself was good. It displayed a lot of character development and emotion. Overall, I liked it. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 ♥ Alexandria ♥ ♪ | 1/9/2014

    " One Of The WORST Books I've Ever Read In School... "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jeannette Brown | 12/13/2013

    " Maybe I would have enjoyed this more if I had been reading it for fun. I read it for class and honestly it's way over my head. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tal | 7/29/2013

    " Simply a must read for anyone who dares enter into a conversation of any kind of human, earth and religious history. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Geoffrey | 3/22/2013

    " Well, they weren't homophobic back then... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 John Rivera | 9/9/2012

    " A quick and interesting read, especially considering it's considered to be the oldest written story known to-date. I was especially interested in the flood story contained in here; one of many or is this the original story of Noah and the Ark? "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kristina | 8/27/2012

    " I had to read this book for my Western Humanities class. It wasn't too bad. A pretty quick read. It was a good basis for the beginning of modern man starting with Mesopotamia. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kamilah | 7/3/2012

    " A must read for anyone literate on Earth. It's full of academic dissection and explanations and other wild guesses, and it's always good to take a delve into the mind of early civilised man. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sally | 3/28/2012

    " My son John Opfer recommended it becomes of its age and classic status. I was rather shocked at the earthy language and events. It was intriguing, interesting. I definitely learned something. Plus I can say I read it. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Sarah Esposito | 1/17/2012

    " A classic read, however the writing is pretty hard to follow. I listened to an audio, standard English version that made it so much better. The story is actually quite good. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cliff | 12/25/2011

    " In my favorite translation of this work, N.K. Sandars does an admirable job structuring the tale as prose, making one of the oldest and most important works in global literary history easily accessible to all. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Cranberrycuppycakes | 5/22/2011

    " I found this like the mesopotamian version of hercules a little , was quite entertaining though "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Caroline | 5/21/2011

    " I read the translation by Mason--absolutely wonderful, but not an option on good reads so I am using this one. I have no way to tell whether any translations is accurate. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Clara | 5/2/2011

    " Not sure how I felt about the translator's fondness for perfect rhymes but was particularly moved by the passages dealing with Enkidu's imminent death. Good stuff. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Marcin | 4/28/2011

    " How does one review the timeless, except to say that even today, four thousand years later, we joke about the idea of women civilizing men. The past may be a different country, but maybe it's not as different as we think. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Krissy | 4/22/2011

    " The story is not my favorite, but I applaud the translation here. I've read the story before, but this one moves a lot more smoothly and that makes it easier to focus on what's actually happening in the plot. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Sean | 4/13/2011

    " A bit of a slog. Probably worthwhile for historical purposes, more than for its own sake. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jessica | 4/5/2011

    " Had to read it for a college class. It was okay, hard to get through for me... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Timothy | 3/27/2011

    " A fine new version of the Gilgamesh tale. The translator's notes at the beginning of the book are very helpful, which is not often the case with these kinds of books. Recommended. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kelly | 3/26/2011

    " This was an interesting read. I read it while walking on my treadmill. Yep, it's kinda short. Being the oldest book, ever, I guess that's ok.
    I'm not sure what to say. I think you have to read it for yourself to understand it. "

Write a Review
What is FlexPass?
  • Your first audiobook is just $5.95
  • Over 90% are at or below $12.95
  • "LOVE IT" guarantee
  • No time limits or expirations
About the Author
Author Stephen Mitchell

Stephen Mitchell was born in Brooklyn in 1943, educated at Amherst, the Sorbonne, and Yale, and de-educated through intensive Zen practice. His many books include the bestselling Tao Te Ching, Gilgamesh, and The Second Book of the Tao, as well as The Gospel according to Jesus, Bhagavad Gita, The Book of Job, and Meetings with the Archangel.

About the Narrator

George Guidall, winner of eighty-eight AudioFile Earphones Awards, has twice won the prestigious Audie Award for Excellence in Audiobook Narration. In 2014 the Audio Publishers Association presented him with the Special Achievement Award for an audiobook narrator of exceptional stature and accomplishment. During his thirty-year recording career he has recorded over 1,100 audiobooks, won multiple awards, been a mentor to many narrators, and shown by example the potential of fine storytelling. Among Guidall’s narration achievements are Crime and Punishment, The Iliad, and John Irving’s A Widow for One Year, which earned him an Audie Award for best unabridged narration of a novel, an honor he captured again for his rendition of Wally Lamb’s I Know This Much Is True. Guidall’s forty-year acting career includes starring roles on Broadway, an Obie Award for best performance off Broadway, and frequent television appearances.