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Download From Eternity to Here: The Quest for the Ultimate Theory of Time Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample From Eternity to Here: The Quest for the Ultimate Theory of Time Audiobook, by Sean Carroll Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (913 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Sean Carroll Narrator: Erik Synnestvedt Publisher: Tantor Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: February 2010 ISBN: 9781400185658
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Time moves forward, not backward-everyone knows you can't unscramble an egg. In the hands of one of today's hottest young physicists, that simple fact of breakfast becomes a doorway to understanding the Big Bang, the universe, and other universes, too. In From Eternity to Here, Sean Carroll argues that the arrow of time, pointing resolutely from the past to the future, owes its existence to conditions before the Big Bang itself-a period of modern cosmology of which Einstein never dreamed. Increasingly, though, physicists are going out into realms that make the theory of relativity seem like child's play. Carroll's scenario is not only elegant, it's laid out in the same easy-to-understand language that has made his group blog, Cosmic Variance, the most popular physics blog on the Net. From Eternity to Here uses ideas at the cutting edge of theoretical physics to explore how properties of space-time before the Big Bang can explain the flow of time we experience in our everyday lives. Carroll suggests that we live in a baby universe, part of a large family of universes in which many of our siblings experience an arrow of time running in the opposite direction. It's an ambitious, fascinating picture of the universe on an ultra-large scale, one that will captivate fans of popular physics blockbusters like Elegant Universe and A Brief History of Time. Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • Carroll employs an easygoing, colloquial style of explanation to explore challenging issues of cosmology. Library Journal

Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alain van Hoof | 2/20/2014

    " I always liked and supported the position: "Because before the BigBang there was no 'time' the question, what was before the BigBang didn't need to be answered because the is no before" After reading this book, I'm open to new suggestions. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Adam Twyman | 2/3/2014

    " Utterly fascinating. A superbly well written book with careful and detailed explanations. Accessible to the lay reader and truly mind bending! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Daniel R. | 1/24/2014

    " This book is a through and frequently tedious exploration for a theory of time. Pay close attention to the word "Quest" in the subtitle. This books poses many questions that don't have answers yet and instead focuses on the various theories that currently exist. The book starts with an introduction to possible definitions of what time is, the role of entropy, and the Second Law of Thermodynamics. With that foundation it dives into microscopic constituents, macroscopic systems, and quantum mechanics before finishing off with inflation, the reversibility of time, and multiverses. I found as I went along the tractability became further removed from everyday life and ended up almost entirely in the realm of theoretical physics and dare I say philosophy. If you are interested in understanding the current state of thinking about what time is, the origins of the universe, and similar topics the author's writing is excellent and the copious footnotes helpful. It just felt like it took an eternity to read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Peter | 1/22/2014

    " I saw Sean Carroll give a talk about this book in Melbourne and it was a virtuoso performance. I really enjoyed the first chapters -- they blew my mind -- but my interest flagged a bit towards the end. I must add that having studied physics for many years, I have learned that when I find something dull, it is usually because I don't understand it. What I got from this book is that comparison between what we think time is and what general relativity says it is is food for much satisfying thought. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 James Carroll | 12/17/2013

    " By far one of the BEST science books I have EVER read. Perhaps one of the best of all time... (I know, cheap pun... I couldn't help myself). "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bill Weaver | 12/14/2013

    " As one holding a doctorate in physical chemistry I find things like the concept of time interesting. It is not as simple as one might think. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Darren | 9/30/2013

    " Awesome... learned a lot about Entropy and the 2nd law of Thermodynamics. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Prasanth Manthena | 9/20/2013

    " Tough to read as an audiobook. That being said I think I understand relativity and entropy better. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nelson | 7/1/2013

    " Not for the faint of heart. This MIT professor is definitely guarding the tower. I made it through about 70% of the book before my brain exploded. I'm still picking up the pieces. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Anne | 3/14/2012

    " The type is so small and the writing is so dense that this just isn't a good bus read for me right now. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Usman W. Chohan | 11/3/2011

    " This book is so astounding in its breadth that understanding its contents is enough for any reader to develop both a liking and a comprehension of all key themes that influence the elusive nature of what can be referred to as 'time'. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Julie Bermond | 8/1/2011

    " Not clear enough for me... Need a bit more knowledge in science, physics and post modern philosophy than the average vulgarisation book on the question "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sarah | 7/4/2011

    " This book could not be more clearly written, and yet I understood almost none of it. If I were reading it as part of a class discussion, I might have understood some of it. I did manage to get barbecue sauce all over the black holes chapter. Oh, me. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Michalis Sarigiannidis | 5/18/2011

    " Sean Carroll really bugs me. There are a few of his conclusions that I really don't like, but I don't know why. This is a great book for anyone interested in time. I think it is really accessible too. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ruck | 5/10/2011

    " Surprisingly accessible and entertaining. This book, believe it or not, became quite a page turner for me. It was one of those " just one more chapter" kind of books, not just because the subject matter is fascinating but also due to Carrol's engaging writing style. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 John | 3/29/2011

    " It is all about the entropy. But so many endnotes... "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Anne | 1/29/2011

    " The type is so small and the writing is so dense that this just isn't a good bus read for me right now. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Eric | 9/1/2010

    " Probably the best book I've read, ever. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nelson | 7/29/2010

    " Not for the faint of heart. This MIT professor is definitely guarding the tower. I made it through about 70% of the book before my brain exploded. I'm still picking up the pieces. "

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About the Author
SEAN CARROLL is a theoretical physicist at the California Institute of Technology. He received his PhD in 1993 from Harvard University. Recently, Carroll has worked on the foundations of quantum mechanics, the arrow of time, and the emergence of complexity. He has been awarded prizes and fellowships by the National Science Foundation, NASA, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, the American Physical Society, the American Institute of Physics, and the Royal Society of London. His most recent award, in 2014, was from the Freedom From Religion Foundation. Carroll has appeared on The Colbert Report (twice), PBS’s NOVA, and Through the Wormhole with Morgan Freeman, and he frequently serves as a science consultant for film and television. He has been interviewed by various NPR shows, Scientific American, Wired, and The New York Times. He has given a TED talk on the multiverse that has more than one million views, and he has participated in a number of well-attended public debates concerning material in his new book, including one in New York City in 2014 with Eben Alexander.
About the Narrator

Erik Synnestvedt has recorded nearly two hundred audiobooks for trade publishers as well as for the Library of Congress Talking Books for the Blind program. They include The Day We Found the Universe by Marcia Bartusiak, A Game as Old as Empire edited by Steven Hiatt, and Twitter Power by Joel Comm.