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Download Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything Audiobook, by Steven D. Levitt Click for printable size audiobook cover
3.00000744518483 out of 53.00000744518483 out of 53.00000744518483 out of 53.00000744518483 out of 53.00000744518483 out of 5 3.00 (268,630 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Steven D. Levitt, Stephen J. Dubner Narrator: Stephen J. Dubner Publisher: HarperCollins Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: July 2012 ISBN: 9780060842963
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Which is more dangerous, a gun or a swimming pool? What do schoolteachers and sumo wrestlers have in common? Why do drug dealers still live with their moms? How much do parents really matter? What kind of impact did Roe v. Wade have on violent crime?

These may not sound like typical questions for an economist to ask. But Steven D. Levitt is not a typical economist. He is a much-heralded scholar who studies the riddles of everyday life—from cheating and crime to sports and child rearing—and whose conclusions regularly turn the conventional wisdom on its head. Thus the new field of study contained in this book: Freakonomics.

Levitt and coauthor Stephen J. Dubner show that economics is, at root, the study of incentives—how people get what they want or need especially when other people want or need the same thing. In Freakonomics, they set out to explore the hidden side of … well, everything. The inner workings of a crack gang. The truth about real-estate agents. The secrets of the Ku Klux Klan.

What unites all these stories is a belief that the modern world is even more intriguing than we think. All it takes is a new way of looking. Steven Levitt, through devilishly clever and clear-eyed thinking, shows how to see through all the clutter.

Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • “Genius…has you gasping in amazement.”

    Wall Street Journal

  • “Prepare to be dazzled.”

    Malcolm Gladwell, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Outliers

  • “It might appear presumptuous of Steven Levitt to see himself as an all-purpose intellectual detective, fit to take on whatever puzzle of human behavior grabs his fancy. But on the evidence of Freakonomics, the presumption is earned.”

    New York Times

  • Freakonomics presents Levitt’s findings in accessible, nonacademic terms. It is an engaging and always interesting work, rich in insights, full of surprises…Freakonomics is packed with fascinating ideas.”

    Washington Post

  • “Levitt employs statistical tools that are simple yet elegant…[A] superb work.”

    Los Angeles Times Book Review

  • “Uncovers entertaining tales of the many quirks of human behavior.”

    Bookmarks Magazine

  • “This excellent, readable book will enlighten many library patrons.”

    Booklist

  • “An eye-opening, and most interesting, approach to the world.”

    Kirkus Reviews

  • “This audiobook is refreshingly accessible and engrossing. Journalist Dubner reads with just the right mix of enthusiasm and awe, revealing juicy morsels of wisdom on everything from what sumo wrestlers and teachers have in common (a propensity to cheat) to whether parents can really push their kids to greatness by buying them Baby Einstein toys and enlisting them in numerous before- and after-school activities (not really)…Entertaining listening.”

    Publishers Weekly

  • A New York Times bestseller
  • A Book Sense Book of the Year, Adult Nonfiction
  • Winner of the 2005 Publishers Weekly Listen-Up Award for Nonfiction
  • A 2005 New York Times Book Review Notable Book

Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Me Too | 2/3/2014

    " An interesting book; well written and fun to read. Take with a grain of salt though. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Marilynn Shea | 2/2/2014

    " excellent 'realistic' way to look at reports from our 'economists'.... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 John | 1/25/2014

    " A fascinating and gloriously politically incorrect use of mathematics to discover the complex mechanisms of how different aspects of our society interact with one another. Kind of wish the book was a bit more concise with it's themes and a bit longer. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Daniel Lamb | 12/19/2013

    " Superficial morons, but not bad given they are economists. : ) "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kristel | 12/19/2013

    " Did not realize that economist could be behaviorist, anthropologists, etc. An excellent resource book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Francesca Santos | 12/9/2013

    " I really loved reading this book! It was such an interesting read and was also a good break from Game of Thrones. haha! Can't wait to read the second book, Superfreakonimics! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Mark Isero | 12/8/2013

    " This book has some good chapters, but overall, the writing is uneven, and I never know how rigorous the social science is. But I can see why students would like this book as an introduction to economics. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Armina | 12/3/2013

    " Couldn't finish it...sometime, somewhere I have already read about the things in this book so it would have been a loss of time to actually finish it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nitra Kosanwit | 11/16/2013

    " I have to admit that the book title made me skeptic. I read it nonetheless, and I loved it!! The world started to make sense, and I even sign up for Freakonomics Radio Station. This is a very entertaining piece yet informative. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Charlotte McClain | 11/5/2013

    " Especially interesting for what parenting and teaching practices make a difference. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Aston | 11/1/2013

    " Lost in itself. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Krista Knigge | 10/25/2013

    " love this stuff "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Slim Jackson | 10/16/2013

    " Haven't read this book in a few years. Need to go through it again. I love alternative theories. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Mirka | 10/5/2013

    " There are some interesting ideas here, and the book does offer food for thought, but the discussion suffers from the writers' inability to recognise their own biases and constant attempt to shove everything into a money-shaped hole. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Annette Welsford | 10/3/2013

    " Interesting. Like the way their minds think outside convention and discover new. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Catherine Polgar | 11/21/2012

    " so great!!!!! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alert Holtman | 5/22/2012

    " Great reading, gives you some stories for in the bar "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Agoodcat | 4/13/2012

    " a very innovative way to use data for digging the deep meaning of the phenomena. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Karina | 3/26/2012

    " I think this book was really eye opening and helped me learn as well as realize some of the incentives of other people. It really helps you learn the reasons of why people do the things they do. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Eden Tanner | 3/2/2012

    " Hilarious and thought provoking. I always appreciate clever handling of data and quirky applications of Science (even if it's only Economics...) and this book fulfils both categories in fascinating ways. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Srikanth | 12/23/2011

    " Amazing.Real good read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kassin | 10/3/2011

    " I can't believe it took me so long to read this - finally! A great book. Economics and the social sciences are practically one in the same; who knew? I guess my degrees were more universal than I previously thought. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 ????? | 5/24/2011

    " one of the few useful book i liked :D "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Blakely | 5/22/2011

    " I enjoyed different parts. Some sections I skipped and some I really enjoyed. Good book to just pick up and read over time. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Todd | 5/21/2011

    " Very interesting stories, easy to read and keep you attention. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Madina | 5/18/2011

    " This book had a different (creative) approach looking at economics. Excellent for those who don't understand economics, involving how the druglords make money, how names can affect people's lives, and much more. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Amy | 5/17/2011

    " The information and the connections made in this book were astounding, but I would often be very bored. Economics bores me to death, and my eyes would glaze over whenever numbers were involved. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Alicia | 5/15/2011

    " Very informative and very entertaining! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Johnrh | 5/14/2011

    " Junk economics? Random, rambling, meandering. Piques one's curiosity. Over-rated IMO. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jennifer | 5/11/2011

    " Everything made perfect sense. Who knew numbers, statistics and data could be so much fun? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Noellebastian | 5/11/2011

    " i can't believe I never read this before now. I highly enjoyed it. I'd read it again. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 lia | 5/10/2011

    " Amazing book! easy to read, and somehow the authors makes an economy book exciting to read.



    "

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About the Author
Author Steven D. Levitt

Steven D. Levitt is the Alvin H. Baum Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago, where he is also director of the Becker Center on Chicago Price Theory. In 2004 he was awarded the John Bates Clark Medal, which recognizes the most influential economist in America under the age of forty. More recently he was named one of Time magazine’s “100 People Who Shape Our World.” He received his BA from Harvard in 1989, his PhD from MIT in 1994, and has taught at the University of Chicago since 1997. He coauthored the bestselling book Freakonomics with Stephen J. Dubner.

About the Narrator

Stephen J. Dubner is an award-winning author, journalist, and radio and television personality. He is best known for his books Freakonomics and SuperFreakonomics, which have sold more than five million copies in thirty-five languages. The Freakonomics enterprise also includes an award-winning blog, a high-profile documentary film, and a public radio project called Freakonomics Radio, which Dubner hosts. He lives in New York with his family.