Extended Audio Sample

Download Edith Wharton: The Short Stories Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Edith Wharton: The Short Stories (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Edith Wharton
4.25 out of 54.25 out of 54.25 out of 54.25 out of 54.25 out of 5 4.25 (8 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Edith Wharton Narrator: Janet Maw Publisher: The Copyright Group Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: April 2010 ISBN:
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Perhaps best known for her classic novel The Age of Innocence, Wharton loved the short story form because its brevity allowed her to concentrate on telling the story. In these three powerful stories, Edith Wharton transports the listener to the turn of the century, where she depicts (without turning to sensationalism) the shocking topics of the time. Often, she opens just after an incident, allowing the listener to be immersed straight into the story.

In 'Souls Belated' we meet a couple on a train, digesting and reacting to that morning's event. In 'The Muse's Tragedy', a young man meets his favourite poet's muse and soon uncovers the truth about their much talked-about relationship. Atypically, 'Roman Fever' starts with a seemingly normal day in Rome and soon reveals a lot more than expected when two middle-aged women start recalling a past trip to the Italian capital. These stories are read by the accomplished actress Janet Maw.

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Janet | 7/23/2013

    " There are so many wonderful quotations I could take from these pages. I find my notes and underlined paragraphs throughout the book. It was so enjoyable that I was disappointed that it wasn't longer. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 David Cerruti | 7/15/2013

    " I did not expect these stories to be my cup of tea, but was pleasantly surprised. Roman Fever was my favorite. The twist at the end was elegant. The other three stories poked fun at the upper-class twits of her day. They were reminiscent of stories by Saki, but not as concise. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kirsti | 11/28/2012

    " This contains one of my favorite Wharton turns of phrase: "the mentally unemployed." "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Megan | 2/17/2012

    " Really loved the sharpness of many of these stories, though by the time I reached the end of the book the hopeless situations and love-going-nowhere was depressing. I'd recommend Xingu. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Linda | 2/9/2012

    " audio stories narrated by Alece. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Susan | 1/12/2012

    " Xingu! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Renee | 10/28/2011

    " Fantastic character descriptions. Written in the early 1900's, they do not seem outdated and the situations are unique with a mix of humor and poignant tenderness. The vocab was very erudite. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sue | 8/24/2011

    " I found a degree of variability in quality among these stories. While they all are well-written, some deal with the themes of social ostracism, feminism and relationships between the sexes better and more interestingly than others. My favorites are "The Pelican" and "Xingu". "

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About the Author
Author Edith Wharton

Edith Wharton (1862–1937) was born in New York and is best known for her stories of life among the upper-class society into which she was born. She was educated privately at home and in Europe. In 1894 she began writing fiction, and her novel The House of Mirth established her as a leading writer. Her novels The Age of Innocence and Old New York were each awarded the Pulitzer Prize. She was the first woman to receive that honor. In 1929 she was awarded the American Academy of Arts and Letters Gold Medal for Fiction.