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Extended Audio Sample The Glimpses of the Moon Audiobook, by Edith Wharton Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (1,115 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Edith Wharton Narrator: Anna Fields Publisher: Blackstone Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: January 2006 ISBN: 9781455174041
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Set in New York in the 1920s, The Glimpses of the Moon details the romantic misadventures of Nick Lansing and Susy Branch, two high-society hangers-on with the right connections but a lack of funds. To maintain their status, they decide to marry and spend a year or so sponging off their wealthy friends, honeymooning in their mansions and villas. Both agree that they're free to dissolve the marriage if either one of them meets someone who can advance them socially. How their scheme unfolds is a comedy of Eros that will charm all fans of Wharton’s work.

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Quotes & Awards

  • “A luscious, worldly, sensuous read, surely the equal of its most obvious offspring, Tender is the Night.”

    Independent (London)

  • “Contrary to…previously reviewed abridged recording[s], Anna Fields reads this edition with precision.”

    Library Journal

  • “As Wharton tells [the] story, the sharp irony of both her prose and her characters bleeds into pools of true feeling.”

    Kirkus Reviews

  • “Field’s voice is intelligent, textured, clear, and varies interestingly with the characters in this voiced reading. This is a wonderful audio.”

    Kliatt

Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cassandra | 2/20/2014

    " one of my absolute favorites. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jennifer | 2/19/2014

    " I really enjoyed this story! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anntonette Alberti | 2/16/2014

    " Sweet book -- the antidote to The House of Mirth! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Debra | 2/11/2014

    " This was an agonizingly frustrating satirical romance. For some reason I actually cared about these assholes, although I'm not sure Wharton intended for me to. I couldn't stand the farcical way both parties did everything but tell the truth. It was painful to read, but I couldn't stop myself from racing through it, figuring all the while that it would end in typical Wharton-style tragedy, sort of like speeding to the scene of a car wreck. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Debra | 2/5/2014

    " This was an agonizingly frustrating satirical romance. For some reason I actually cared about these assholes, although I'm not sure Wharton intended for me to. I couldn't stand the farcical way both parties did everything but tell the truth. It was painful to read, but I couldn't stop myself from racing through it, figuring all the while that it would end in typical Wharton-style tragedy, sort of like speeding to the scene of a car wreck. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kathryn | 2/4/2014

    " This is a book about the lives of the rich and true love in the 1920's. I enjoy Wharton's writting, including this book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Brianna | 1/26/2014

    " This is a good introduction to Edith Wharton for readers of modern fiction. It's a lighter read (in tone and mass) than House of Mirth, but less satisfying for lovers of the classics. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Maura | 1/26/2014

    " One of the few Edith Wharton books with a fairly happy ending. Nick Lansing and Susy Branch are both barely getting by in the wealthy social circles they move in. Sensing in each other some finer qualities lacking in those they move among, they are drawn to one another and decide to marry as a sort of business partnership, helping each other to survive on limited funds. On the surface they agree to set the other free if a better "opportunity" presents itself; that is, a wealthier marriage partner comes along. But as they honeymoon, they realize that they prize those intangible qualities they have discovered in each other, more than the material wealth that might be theirs in a richer match. For a while they manage on the borrowed houses of their wealthy friends, but eventually their obligations to those friends cause a rift between them and Nick leaves. Each of them strains to find a way to exist without the other, as each falls back into the superficial social life of their very rich friends. But both of them come to realize the worth of what they had, and after a few missed chances, they reunite (in what is for Wharton, a fairly romantic scene). They will live somewhat happily, if poorly, ever after. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Heather | 1/25/2014

    " not usually my favorite genre for fiction, but i got thoroughly lost in this story and world. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Joyce M. Tice | 1/16/2014

    " Not my favorite Wharton, and I was disapointed with the ending, but I needed to read this to complete my Wharton readings. It is about a world where people are using people at all levels for all purposes. They don't even try to camaflouge it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sonia Reppe | 1/14/2014

    " My favorite Wharton. I cried at the end, (but I was pregnant and hormonal at the time). "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tessa | 1/14/2014

    " I'd never read Wharton before and picked this up on a whim because it seemed the most intelligent and charming of the new books section in the main library. It was charming indeed, but also emotionally torturous in the delightful way that well written romances are. Not, like, romance novels in the modern commercial sense, but in the Thomas Hardy sense. Only from the '20s. However, being a fan of tension, especially romantic tension, the letdown at the resolution was both a relief and akin to being slapped in the face by a cut rubber band. Which is really a testament to the well-written story! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Terry | 1/9/2014

    " I loved this book! Edith Wharton is one of my favorite authors. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jennifer | 1/5/2014

    " i liked it-- read it while traveling in europe. but it left me melancholy. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kirsten | 12/31/2013

    " i love Edith Wharton, so I was excited to find one (project gutenberg + nook) that i hadn't read. I will admit to skimming some internal dialog near the end to find out what happens. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dileri | 12/30/2013

    " Delicious! So fun and funny, and well-written, as expected from Edith Wharton. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Elaina OKeefe | 12/26/2013

    " loved this book...i'll review later. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sarah | 11/30/2013

    " A delicious story expertly told. Wharton never disappoints. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Heather | 11/18/2013

    " not usually my favorite genre for fiction, but i got thoroughly lost in this story and world. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Katie | 11/15/2013

    " Eeeiii! This book drove me crazy, in the best way possible. Another fabulous classic romance, fun and witty with some great social commentary! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tamara | 11/4/2013

    " Adore Edith Wharton. There are some brilliant and poignant moments in this book, but the plot is not quite as compelling, nor the characters as memorable as some of her other novels. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jillian | 11/1/2013

    " I loved this book even better than The Age of Innocence and Ethan Frome. The language is beautiful, the characters are likeable, and the relationships are complex and oddly realistic. I felt sorry for Coral Hicks, but I loved the happy ending. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Carla | 9/22/2013

    " In lesser hands this material would be sappy, marriage of expedience, the social whirl, etc. Wharton, however, is SUCH a good storyteller that you sail to the finish(that's got a sweet twist). "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Pam | 9/2/2013

    " I love Edith Wharton. There were times when I wanted to scream at the main characters, but that almost made the novel better. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Julia | 7/19/2013

    " This was a pretty love story. I only gave it a three based on how I've rated other books. It's not one I would say, "Ooh! You HAVE to read thsi book." But, it was an intriguing book and I loved the ending!! Very Romantic. :-) "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Casey | 1/4/2013

    " I am done with Ms. Wharton, at least for now. I kept hoping for another Age Of Innocence and this was not it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 laninaki | 12/28/2012

    " This is easily my favorite of Wharton's novels. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 brooke sellers | 11/16/2012

    " A good story and a classic writer that I had previously not read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Katy | 10/3/2012

    " I love Wharton, I am trying to be more stingy with my stars though...this was not as good as House of Mirth or Age of Innocence. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Terry | 7/17/2012

    " I loved this book! Edith Wharton is one of my favorite authors. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Joyce M. Tice | 7/4/2012

    " Not my favorite Wharton, and I was disapointed with the ending, but I needed to read this to complete my Wharton readings. It is about a world where people are using people at all levels for all purposes. They don't even try to camaflouge it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ruth | 6/29/2012

    " Whenever I read Edith Wharton, I can be assured of beautiful prose, frustrating characters, and an undercurrent of desperation running through all. After spending nearly the entire novel wanting to slap the central characters out of their silliness. I confess myself satisfied in the end. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alexis | 5/14/2012

    " Lovely language and description. Really fleshes out the era it was written in. It's a love story set in the upper-eschelons of society. One could call it a refined "Gossip Girl" episode in a book, but of course more dynamic. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Claire | 4/4/2012

    " A surprising happy ending from Edith. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alwa | 3/22/2012

    " Edith Wharton conceding that being a spoiled brat when it's financially impossible to do so is not, in fact, a pitiable, congenital, and always terminal ailment? Delightful! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Laura | 2/26/2012

    " It is all about love and money by Edith Wharton managed to tell the story in a charming way. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Christine | 11/27/2011

    " I thoroughly enjoyed this novel. Wharton bring her usual genius at characterization, irony and satire to bear in this story of marriage, social mores and the tyranny of money--and the lack of it. Wonderful book. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Amy | 11/12/2011

    " I chose this book based on the cover. Lee Anne was reading it and her copy had an amazingly awesome dust jacket. My copy is not as pretty. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joell | 8/17/2011

    " You could call it predictable but Wharton's stories about the moral struggles of the wildly wealthy are always a good read. I found it a great love story as well. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Pam | 5/8/2011

    " I love Edith Wharton. There were times when I wanted to scream at the main characters, but that almost made the novel better. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kim Leighton matthews | 4/20/2011

    " This is a Wharton novel that actually has a happy ending! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kirsten | 4/15/2011

    " i love Edith Wharton, so I was excited to find one (project gutenberg + nook) that i hadn't read. I will admit to skimming some internal dialog near the end to find out what happens. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 brooke sellers | 3/18/2011

    " A good story and a classic writer that I had previously not read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Laura Anthony | 3/3/2011

    " Classic Wharton with a happy ending. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dave | 1/15/2011

    " Isn't all Edith Wharton wonderful, but this is a pleasure as well - not quite so laden with a sense of doom slowly settling in, and much more life and whimsy. I'm not going to pick the best among her masterworks, but this one found a place in my heart. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 cynesthesia | 1/3/2011

    " A lighter, sweeter Wharton novel, romantic in the best sort of way. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Amanda | 11/27/2010

    " Gorgeous, with the slight minus of all those pesky morals. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jennifer | 11/22/2010

    " One of the few pleasing conclusions in her repertoire. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alwa | 11/8/2010

    " Edith Wharton conceding that being a spoiled brat when it's financially impossible to do so is not, in fact, a pitiable, congenital, and always terminal ailment? Delightful! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kathryn | 10/14/2010

    " This is a book about the lives of the rich and true love in the 1920's. I enjoy Wharton's writting, including this book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bethany | 9/17/2010

    " Beautiful, as all of Wharton's work is. Still much prefer House of Mirth, though I think I liked this better than Age of Innocence. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 jenn | 9/1/2010

    " Sweet but predictable. Wharton's world can be a little tough to swallow at times - like when supposedly poor people still have servants. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Pam | 7/20/2010

    " I love Edith Wharton. There were times when I wanted to scream at the main characters, but that almost made the novel better. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Joyce M. | 7/11/2010

    " Not my favorite Wharton, and I was disapointed with the ending, but I needed to read this to complete my Wharton readings. It is about a world where people are using people at all levels for all purposes. They don't even try to camaflouge it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Barbara | 4/8/2010

    " Listened to the LibriVox version read by Elizabeth Klett. Excellent reader!!!

    Interesting story and fairly likeable people. But what a way to live! It was amusing when it dawned on Susie that she could actually work for a living. "

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About the Author
Author Edith Wharton

Edith Wharton (1862–1937) was born in New York and is best known for her stories of life among the upper-class society into which she was born. She was educated privately at home and in Europe. In 1894 she began writing fiction, and her novel The House of Mirth established her as a leading writer. Her novels The Age of Innocence and Old New York were each awarded the Pulitzer Prize. She was the first woman to receive that honor. In 1929 she was awarded the American Academy of Arts and Letters Gold Medal for Fiction.

About the Narrator

Kate Fleming (a.k.a. Anna Fields) (1965–2006), winner of more than a dozen Earphones Awards and the prestigious Audie Award in 2004, was one of the most respected narrators in the industry. Trained at the Actors Theatre of Louisville, she was also a director, producer, and technician at her own studio, Cedar House Audio.