Download The All New Don't Think of an Elephant!: Know Your Values and Frame the Debate Audiobook

The All New Dont Think of an Elephant!: Know Your Values and Frame the Debate Audiobook, by George Lakoff Extended Sample Click for printable size audiobook cover
Author: George Lakoff Narrator: Chris Sorensen Publisher: Recorded Books, LLC Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: September 2014 ISBN: 9781490657974
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (1,846 ratings) (rate this audio book)
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Since it became an international bestseller in 2004, Don't Think of an Elephant! has been the definitive handbook for progressives who want to articulate their goals and values to voters, understand how conservatives think and why people often vote against their best interests, and frame the political debate. Completely revised and updated to tackle today's issues, the 10th Anniversary Edition not only explains what framing is and how it works but also reveals why, after a brief stint of winning the framing wars in the 2008 elections, the Democrats have gone back to losing them, and what can be done about it. In this powerful new volume, George Lakoff delves into the issues that will dominate the midterm elections in 2014, the coming presidential elections, and beyond. He examines the current progressive and conservative frames on climate change, inequality, immigration, education, abortion, marriage, healthcare, national security, energy, and more. He explores why some issues have been difficult to frame, guides readers on how to frame complex issues without losing important context, and drives home the important differences between framing and spin. Do you think facts alone can win a debate? Do you think you know what makes a Tea Party follower tick? Do you think you understand how to communicate on key issues that can improve peoples' lives? Whether you answer yes or no, the insights in Don't Think of an Elephant! will not only surprise you, but also give you the tools you need to develop frames that work, and eradicate frames that backfire. Download and start listening now!

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  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sara | 2/14/2014

    " This book contains interesting ideas about how to frame issues from a progressive point-of-view. The biggest concern that I had with the book is that he bases nearly all his advice on the idea that the basic difference between liberals and conservatives are how they think about the family. However, he never tries to prove this. Without knowing whether to believe his basic premise, it is hard to know how much stock to put in the advice that follows from that premise. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Amethyst | 2/7/2014

    " EXTREMELY useful and informative, plus short and sweet. A great rhetorical analysis of how Republicans took control of the political debate over the last 15 years or so, and clear, cogent and intelligent ideas about how to take control of a rhetorical situation by framing the debate. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anika | 2/5/2014

    " It's essential to understand the way we and they look at power structures and identify with politics. Though Lakoff didn't give me much hope for the future of communications between conservatives and liberals. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tiffany | 2/3/2014

    " This book helped me finally discover what truly makes liberals and conversatives tick. I now understand that my conservative friends are not crazy, they just come from a different moral viewpoint. I highly recommend for anyone during this political season. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tom | 1/16/2014

    " Sort of slim. Really, an essay between covers. Nevertheless underscores the reality of the inability of the intellectual left to make their worthy ideas accessible to the common person. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sandra | 1/14/2014

    " This is a must read. You must have read this book, and you should probably be re-reading it by now! ;) "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Phoebe | 12/22/2013

    " Not exactly revolutionary now, but if you work in politics, progressive advocacy, communications, or just hate how the conservative right has taken over the debate, read this book. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Bridget | 12/19/2013

    " I FAR preferred "The Political Mind". "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Paul | 11/29/2013

    " Great book, introduced me to frames-of-meaning. I now include frames-of-meaning concepts in all my workshops--see my summary. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alison | 11/21/2013

    " This book has a political tone obviously, but it is a great book to illustrate how language is used to frame our thinking. After reading it I became much more aware of the subconscience influence.... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Libby | 9/22/2013

    " lost points because it's a repetitive collection of essays/articles. Did get me to think a lot about 'responsibility' and 'care' "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Crystal | 8/24/2013

    " Very good for understanding how political debates shape thoughts and then manipulate people. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tori | 3/21/2013

    " This is a quick-and-dirty rundown of why conservatives have been so successful in the last few decades. I think there are deeper explanations, but the discussion of framing is spot-on. The book starts out strong and peters out, but the first few chapters are powerful and clearly written. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Seth | 2/16/2013

    " this is a good book that every progressive, liberal democrat should read. at least the first essay, the rest is kind of repetative. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kevin | 12/14/2012

    " How we got to the mess we are in "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tyler | 6/21/2012

    " That I want to study linguistics for the benefit of righteous causes. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bill | 10/19/2011

    " Conservatives have stolen America from Americans; I want it back. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ryan | 10/15/2011

    " This book has some great insight and is really well written. It is a compilation of essays, and some of them are a bit repetitive. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jimmy | 9/17/2011

    " This book should be read by all progressives, and or democrats to better understand the republican party "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Henry | 7/31/2011

    " I cant believe how badly written it is, and badly formatted and generally submerges it's valid insights under too much verbiage. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alejandro | 5/12/2011

    " Very good and simple breakdown on political message framing. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Gerad | 3/29/2011

    " There are some very interesting points made here, but this a series of essays pulled from different sources so the whole thing gets very redundant. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alex | 2/19/2011

    " An awesome intro to the role of language in politics but a bit simple/redundant if you're expecting one of his more fleshed out books. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 doug | 12/15/2010

    " I enjoyed this book, but lakoff gets repetitive, which is a bit surprising given how short the book is. But that also means you don't have to put up with the repetitiveness for long...

    Either way, Lakoff has a lot of interesting insights on the framing of liberal political goals. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Philip | 11/14/2010

    " A good introduction to the concept of framing, but most of the meat is in the first few chapters "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Michelleparada531 | 11/8/2010

    " Don't pay heed to the title too much....this book is an insight for anyone along any part of the political spectrum. It really gets you thinking about how language is used and manipulated, often times without you really being aware of its happening. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lisa | 10/25/2010

    " I wish he'd edited the lectures he combines here for one streamlined rant, as it's a really good one. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Peter | 10/18/2010

    " A concise book offering a very interesting way too look at the progressive v. conservative debate in the United States and an explanation of why liberals are having such a hard time of it. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Henry | 9/6/2010

    " I cant believe how badly written it is, and badly formatted and generally submerges it's valid insights under too much verbiage. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cybild | 8/29/2010

    " This is a great book for anyone critical of the way Progressives do political messaging. Lots of messaging tips, things about the Right that are terrifying, but that everyone should know anyway, and some proselytizing by Lakeoff which I could probably have done without. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 David | 8/14/2010

    " Lots of interesting ideas in a short book with a high information density. Very informally written, and you must be able to put up with Lakoff's insufferable, smug self-righteousness. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Greg | 7/16/2010

    " Like all of Lakoff's work, definitely some of the best Democratic political insight out there. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Raquel | 5/24/2010

    " An interesting thought exercise, and I liked his clear definition of the logic of progressive values, but ultimately his premise of family models translating into politics is not convincing. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dagnew | 5/16/2010

    " The 'framing' of issues is of great importance - and "conservatives" (who believe in conserving their money, but little else, BTW) are way better at it than progressives. "

About the Author

George Lakoff is an American cognitive linguist best known for his thesis that lives of individuals are influenced by the central metaphors used to explain complex phenomena. He has written several works on mathematics, politics, and language, including Metaphors We Live By, which introduced his metaphor thesis. He is a professor of linguistics at the University of California, Berkeley, where he has taught since 1972.

About the Narrator

Chris Sorenson has worked extensively as an actor, playwright, and screenwriter. He studied at the Rutgers Professional Actor Training Program and is an original member of the Present Company, producers of FringeNYC. The Thin Air Theatre Company of Colorado considers him their playwright-at-large and have produced ten of his plays over the past eleven years. His screenplays The Roswell Project and Classic Rock are both currently in production, and his horror script Suckerville is currently in development. He has received three AudioFile Earphones Awards, and his recording of Sent by Margaret Peterson Haddix was selected by AudioFile as one of the Best Audiobooks of 2010.