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Download Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight: An African Childhood Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Dont Lets Go to the Dogs Tonight: An African Childhood (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Alexandra Fuller
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (22,336 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Alexandra Fuller Narrator: Lisette Lecat Publisher: Recorded Books Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: December 2003 ISBN:
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Alexandra Fuller tells the idiosyncratic story of her life growing up white in rural Rhodesia as it was becoming Zimbabwe. The daughter of hardworking, yet strikingly unconventional English-bred immigrants, Alexandra arrives in Africa at the tender age of two. She moves through life with a hardy resilience, even as a bloody war approaches. Narrator Lisette Lecat reads this remarkable memoir of a family clinging to a harsh landscape and the dying tenets of colonialism. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Karen Hunt | 2/14/2014

    " This is a memoirs of a white girl growing up in Africa. Most of the book is set in Rhodesia/Zimbabwe. A nice, engaging, different book, which gives you some insight into the recent history of that country. Quite enjoyed it, but felt it ended a bit suddenly. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Caroline Hooper | 2/9/2014

    " Many times while reading this book I thought to put it down. I didn't, however and finished it but can't say I enjoyed it. Actually, it was somewhat disturbing. The mother in the book was mentally ill, and the family in many ways represents the worst of the British Empire expatriates. In another context they would have been no more than white trash. So, although it was all that, it some strange way it was captivating. The mother certainly had a love of animals, and the father seems to have been a hard-worker. The family was close. Fuller's childhood was indeed interesting--growing up in Africa in the midst of civil war and African nationalism. I don't know that I recommend this book, but if you have time you might want to check it out. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lisa Houlihan | 2/7/2014

    " This had been on my to-read list since the friends who founded Good Books Lately included it among their first recommendations. It's remarkable for its blatant, unquestioning racism; for how you find yourself inescapably in these alien lands, nations, cultures; for its descriptions of weather and landscape. It doesn't cohere into a single narrative with development and a plot but not everything has to. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bowleslinda | 1/24/2014

    " Planning to read it again on Kindle very soon. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mel Bel | 1/22/2014

    " Delightful, scary, and probably so, so true! I couldn't put it down. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Terrill | 1/21/2014

    " This book led to an interesting book club discussion. . . why would you choose to raise your children in a place where they are in constant danger from civil war and disease? What was it like to be a fifth-generation white African at the time when the control of many nations was reverting back to the blacks? How can anyone possibly drink so much? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Darcy | 1/20/2014

    " Terrific narrative. Beautifully descriptive passages of Africa give one a break from the hard times of this little girls. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Danielle | 1/18/2014

    " In the beginning, I did not love this book. I found it to be missing the introspection that memoirs are meant to have. It seemed emotionally unrealized. But then, over time, through pages, the picture of this family was better developed, and I could see where the author was coming from. This is an honest book about a childhood in Africa, as a white African farming family. There is violence, and loss, and sadness. But there's also an amazing love of life. It offers a different perspective from most of the books on Africa that I have read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sunni | 1/17/2014

    " This one is so detail-heavy I'm getting a little lost and a little distracted. I'll finish it someday.... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Nic Hartmann | 1/8/2014

    " Fuller takes you on a journey that is never easy, and quite often heart-breaking, in order to show the uneasiness behind being an Anglo-African. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Remy Kothe | 11/10/2013

    " An excellent example of "what doesn't kill you makes you stronger." This is an incredible story. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Abby | 11/4/2013

    " Alexandra's story of her childhood growing up in Africa with complicated parents and a very tough physical landscape. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Betty | 10/20/2013

    " Interesting autobiography telling of the life of one English family that made Rhodesia/Zimbabwe their home just before and during the revolution. They also lived in Malawi, South Africa, and Zambia. Tobacco and livestock farmers. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kimberly | 9/19/2013

    " I don't know how Ms. Fuller survived her childhood, but I'm so glad she did--I love her books! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Julia | 5/27/2013

    " A wonderful memoir. I'm a sucker for the child's point-of-view narrative but in this case I would have liked some adult description and commentary on the racist and colonialist beliefs and practices of the family. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Elsie | 1/17/2013

    " Very interesting about growing up in Rhodesia (later to become Zimbabwe), Malawi and Zambia. New perspective on life but too much alcohol. Borrowed it from a neighbor who is South African. Worth the read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Claire | 12/27/2012

    " Excellent read giving insight into living in Zimbabwe and Zambia "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mary Fox | 10/26/2012

    " Loved this book. A girl's childhood in Africa, happy, sad interesting and funny. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Julie | 10/6/2012

    " I love books about Africa and this is one of my favorites. Worth reading again and again. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Cat | 7/21/2012

    " Evocative memoir of growing up in Rhodesia during colonial times. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Sky | 7/1/2012

    " Had to stop reading this - too depressing. Not a good choice for the post-partum months, in particular. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sharon | 6/24/2012

    " Very easy to get into & stay involved "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Scooter Monkey | 3/24/2012

    " Didn't care for it. It was like being stuck in a room with people who had been friends for years telling bits and pieces of stories that I have no connection too. Couldn't get into it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lamandra | 2/13/2012

    " Beautifully written, unabashedly honest, jaw-dropping account of the author's childhood in Africa. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Katherine Rae | 12/25/2011

    " A sad story for everyone... the acceptance of the horrors they live through remind me of Leonardo DiCaprio in Blood Diamond "T I A - this is Africa". "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Margie | 8/14/2011

    " I really enjoyed this book. It reminded me of Poisonwood Bible ( my favorite book ). A good read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Christopher | 6/27/2011

    " Love this book. Read it twice, which is rare for me. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nadia | 6/16/2011

    " beautifully written. never became engrossed with the story though. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Christine | 6/8/2011

    " Loved this book, did not want it to end! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Linda | 6/6/2011

    " A wild and wacky childhood, written with humor and compassion. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Laura | 6/4/2011

    " felt this was honestly told;glad I finally was able to read "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jennie | 6/1/2011

    " I adore this book, this author. She is wonderful. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Elaine | 5/30/2011

    " I absolutely loved this book. She was on the 2008 UND Writer's Conference panel and was so very interesting. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Leeanne | 5/29/2011

    " I read this book a few years ago and have thought about the story often times in the years since. This story made me laugh out loud and cry. Highly recommend. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Linda | 5/28/2011

    " After being in Zimbabwe I enjoyed this,but it got a little whiney at end "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Princessfaz | 5/26/2011

    " Very interesting account of the authors childhood in Africa. I liked it but was depressed half the time reading it. "

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About the Author
Author Alexandra Fuller

Alexandra Fuller was born in England in 1969. In 1972, she moved with her family to a farm in southern Africa. She lived in Africa until her mid-twenties. In 1994, she moved to Wyoming. She is the author of three memoirs, including the New York Times bestseller Cocktail Hour under the Tree of Forgetfulness.

About the Narrator

Lisette Lecat began her career in her native South Africa, where she had stage roles and did extensive radio and voice-over work both commercially and for the South African Broadcasting Corporation. Living in Spain, England, and the United States, she did a wide range of voice-over work in three languages. She has won thirteen AudioFile Earphones Awards and the prestigious Audie Award for best female solo narration.