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Download Claudius the God: And His Wife, Messalina Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Claudius the God: And His Wife, Messalina (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Robert Graves
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (4,504 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Robert Graves Narrator: Frederick Davidson Publisher: Blackstone Audio, Inc. Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: December 2009 ISBN:
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With the same brilliance that characterized his classic I, Claudius, Robert Graves continues the tumultuous life of the Roman who became emperor in spite of himself and his handicaps. Claudius the God reveals the splendor, vitality, and decadence of the Roman Empire through the eyes of the wry and bemused Claudius, who reigns as emperor for 13 years.

The crippled Claudius describes himself as the fool of the royal family, whom none of his ambitious and blood-thirsty relatives considered worth the trouble of killing. Once on the throne, however, he finds himself at last at the center of the political maelstrom.

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jo | 2/9/2014

    " The continuing tale of the life of former Roman Emperor Claudius. This novel picks up where the previous one left off, with the death of Caligula and Claudius reluctantly taking charge. It's interesting enough, mostly because most of the stories are so wild they couldn't be made up and Graves sticks as close to the truth as possible. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Matimate | 2/7/2014

    " I was thinking how to describe this historical novel and frankly said it is hard to do so. Robert Graves focused his two novels on one of the most interesting person who ruled the Roman empire. Man who was survivor in the environment where others perishes so easily he maneuvered so skillfully partly due the fact the everybody considered him to be stammering idiot not even worth of killing in power struggles and yet Claudius crisply made his observation about people around him and about the fact that he saw his relatives dying and fighting each other. The vivid picture of the gluttony and darkness of the court of the roman emperors is masterfully presented and drags reader closer, perhaps more closer then reader wants. Even in the death of Claudius is strange irony. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Russell Barger | 1/31/2014

    " As good as I Claudius. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 John Moonitz | 1/30/2014

    " See my review on I Claudius . . . and . . . ditto . . . "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Patrick | 1/29/2014

    " Fantastic read but not as good as I, Claudius. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Meirav Rath | 1/3/2014

    " If you loved I Claudius, you'll love this book. 'Claudius' is his usual snappy, all-seeing miserable self, wading around through Rome's streets and palace as he finally starts to carve his own life's paths and directions (as much as the poor thing can). As the first book, this is a fun read I highly recommend to all enthusiasts of the Roman Empire. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sarah | 12/27/2013

    " Continuing story of the Emperor Claudius and his dysfunctional family. Excellent. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Scurra | 12/22/2013

    " Not quite as much fun as the first, but perhaps more intense. The first-person narrative manages to keep the suspense level high, and yet manages to tell plenty of other stories without them feeling artificial (not too much overt plot-exposition here.) "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tyler | 12/18/2013

    " Not as a good as the original, not quite as compelling. But, it is still a good wrap-up to the first book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Anders | 12/10/2013

    " Graves's genius does not work as well when he is retelling events from the perspective of the main protagonist, rather than from that of an "outsider" (as Claudius is in "I, Claudius"). It comes across as stodgy, almost like a government report. It is still enjoyable reading. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Andrea | 12/5/2013

    " The sequel to I, Claudius. Just as good as the first one. Again tedious if you are not a Classicist though. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 zzzz | 11/25/2013

    " I liked the book overall, but the ending was so depressing... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Annene | 11/21/2013

    " Listening to the audio book of this at the moment. The narrator is pretty tedious and it makes me want to read the text again so I can substitute Derek Jacobi's voice for his (like it was when I first read this in the 70's.) "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lynn | 11/18/2013

    " Claudius' decline into madness (or not?) and his evil wife Messalina take the stage. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kristine | 8/8/2013

    " While the history and intrigue is interesting, the first book, I, Claudius was much better in my opinion. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dana | 6/10/2013

    " See review of I Claudius. This is the sequel. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Joann | 4/25/2013

    " A disappointment after the wonderful soap opera of I Claudius! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Susannah | 3/19/2013

    " This book is fantastic. Definitely recommended to anyone who loves Ancient Rome. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Samantha | 2/27/2013

    " I read this sequal to "I, Claudius" via audiobook. I didn't enjoy it quite as much as "I, Claudius," but it was very interesting and puts me in a mood to read more Roman histories. The narrator, Claudius, is also very endearing and sympathetic. I'd like to name a cat after him. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ben Fowlkes | 2/11/2013

    " Slightly more tedious than I, Claudius, but once you read one you really have no choice but to tackle the other. Sorry. That's just how it works. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Diana | 11/3/2012

    " Brilliant. Followed on from Derek Jacobi's I Claudius - shame it was abridged - I could have listened for ever! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Stephen | 3/16/2012

    " Might be even better than "I, Claudius" if that's possible (which it might not be). "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 eb | 11/15/2011

    " That Messalina; what a hussy. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Heather Moore | 9/23/2011

    " Love this and 'I Claudius'. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gregory | 9/4/2011

    " See my review of I, Claudius. All that I said there applies equally to this book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Helen | 8/28/2011

    " A worthy sequel to "I,Claudius" written in the same great style as the latter. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Michael | 7/30/2011

    " Slightly less enjoyable than the first, but still wonderful. (Really 4.75 stars, in my book.) "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Satria | 3/5/2011

    " I liked the book overall, but the ending was so depressing... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Megan | 3/4/2011

    " The books, like the miniseries, are less interesting without Livia around, and the whole thing with Messalina was just painfully drawn out; loved the invasion of Britain, though, and the primary texts at the end. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Elaine | 2/6/2011

    " Second volume of the Graves classic. See I,Claudius for review. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Scurra | 9/22/2010

    " Not quite as much fun as the first, but perhaps more intense. The first-person narrative manages to keep the suspense level high, and yet manages to tell plenty of other stories without them feeling artificial (not too much overt plot-exposition here.) "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nathan | 9/8/2010

    " Just as good as the first part in the series, "I, Claudius". "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Faith | 9/4/2010

    " I read this twice - once 10 years ago and again two years ago. It's time to send it on for others to enjoy. Would recommend it highly, especially fans of the mini-series. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Helen | 7/31/2010

    " A worthy sequel to "I,Claudius" written in the same great style as the latter. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tay | 7/26/2010

    " My copy just says "Claudius the God". 1962 used copy with a cover featuring a chipped, mosaic portrait of Claudius holding a broken eagle scepter. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 D-day | 7/23/2010

    " Not as good as 'I Claudius' but still good "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ben | 7/16/2010

    " Slightly more tedious than I, Claudius, but once you read one you really have no choice but to tackle the other. Sorry. That's just how it works. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lynn | 5/12/2010

    " Claudius' decline into madness (or not?) and his evil wife Messalina take the stage. "

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About the Author
Author Robert Graves

Robert Graves (1895–1985) was an English poet, translator, and novelist, one of the leading English men of letters in the twentieth century. He fought in World War I and won international acclaim in 1929 with the publication of his memoir of the First World War, Good-bye to All That. After the war, he was granted a classical scholarship at Oxford and subsequently went to Egypt as the first professor of English at the University of Cairo. He is most noted for his series of novels about the Roman emperor Claudius and his works on mythology, such as The White Goddess.

About the Narrator

Frederick Davidson (1932–2005), also known as David Case, was one of the most prolific readers in the audiobook industry, recording more than eight hundred audiobooks in his lifetime, including over two hundred for Blackstone Audio. Born in London, he trained at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art and performed for many years in radio plays for the British Broadcasting Company before coming to America in 1976. He received AudioFile’s Golden Voice Award and numerous Earphones Awards and was nominated for a Grammy for his readings.