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Download Children of Dune Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Children of Dune Audiobook, by Frank Herbert Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (38,086 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Frank Herbert Narrator: Simon Vance, Scott Brick Publisher: Macmillan Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Related: The Dune Chronicles Release Date: February 2008 ISBN: 9781427202925
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Frank Herbert’s bestselling science fiction series of all time continues! In this third installment, the sand-blasted world of Arrakis has become green, watered and fertile. Old Paul Atreides, who led the desert Fremen to political and religious domination of the galaxy, is gone. But for the children of Dune, the very blossoming of their land contains the seeds of its own destruction. The altered climate is destroying the giant sandworms, and this in turn is disastrous for the planet’s economy. Leto and Ghanima, Paul Atreides’s twin children and his heirs, can see possible solutions—but fanatics begin to challenge the rule of the all-powerful Atreides empire, and more than economic disaster threatens…

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Craig | 2/10/2014

    " Rereading the Dune series this summer. One of the best book series ever covering politics, power, ecology, economics, and human nature. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 William | 2/10/2014

    " There is an effort here to go back to the original style, but it is still full of boring political drabble. Then superworm comes to the rescue and makes everyone bow down to him. The end, and no more Dune for William. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Karan | 2/5/2014

    " This was a great book. Just loved it. Found it an interesting followup to Dune and Dune Messiah. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Anselm | 1/26/2014

    " I read the first three Dune books when I'd just been hired to do a heavy duty admin job that promised much politics (turned out to be less than I though, though no lack thereof nonetheless) - and while I stayed with them, all the intrigue started to prey on my building anxieties and by the time the kid starting turn into a worm I couldn't take it anymore. Now, five years later, reading them again minus the job but plus a hideous flu, I'm super impressed. Goes to show what replacing anxiety with illness can do for the imagination. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Poindextra | 1/13/2014

    " Neither Dune sequel was as good as the original, and this one really dragged. Most of the time it was, what's the point, here? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Seth Kenlon | 1/11/2014

    " By this time my interest had waned from the Dune story. This is still a very good book, though, and should be read if you like those long epics. This was the last Dune book I read. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kay | 1/8/2014

    " He should have stopped while he was ahead, IMHO. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Elissa Rich | 1/3/2014

    " The rest of the series goes far into "the Himalayas of thought," as my stepfather would say, and thus admittedly diminishes my enjoyment overall -- but Children of Dune, like the first novel, manages to maintain something of a balance between action, intrigue, and interesting sociopolitical puzzles. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Leeza | 11/17/2013

    " I couldn't get through this one. I just didn't connect with it like the first two. It was rough. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Tamara | 11/14/2013

    " Should've just donated it. I loved the interweaving of all the story lines and all the various characters thinking the were in control of an outcome. The ending was just disappointing. Should've stopped at Dune. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Leisa | 11/11/2013

    " Better then the first 2 in the series :) more in depth characters "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Davo | 11/4/2013

    " So long. Yet kinda good. I just wanted to know what happened. This is the last of the Dune books I'll read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ben | 11/2/2013

    " So far, so good. More action than Messiah. Not that action is what this series is all about, but it certainly makes it exciting. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kendall | 10/8/2013

    " I loved Dune but this one felt like a desperate attempt to recapture the original uniqueness of Dune. It was too far out for me and I didn't even make it to the end. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Daria | 2/13/2013

    " A bit more interesting than Dune Messiah... plot picks up here. I've heard the fourth book is excellent as well, but I haven't gotten to that one yet. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jay Hendricks | 1/26/2013

    " Personally my 2nd favorite of the books. Time in this is a little weird as the author jumps a few months without really saying much to clue you in that this thing is happening. Still a very fun good read, great ending imo. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sheri | 1/6/2013

    " This is the 3rd book in the Dune trilogy. Like LOTR, the 1st & 3rd books are significantly better than the middle book. Children of Dune is more character & plot driven than Dune Messiah, and the larger "messages" address the problems inherent in societies where religion & government are unitary. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Todd | 11/8/2012

    " the third in the series. fucking awesome. frank found his voice again. more like the original and what i really love about these books are the philosophical elements. especially his view of religion. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 David | 9/17/2012

    " I think my memories of this have been clouded by the sci-fi miniseries, but it's still a very good book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bryn Powell | 4/6/2012

    " What the holy fup? I want a dose of whatever Frank was on. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Alex | 11/2/2011

    " By this point in the series, we have a collection of literary tropes so transparently meant to make us feel awe at the power of the main characters that of course they fail. We also learn that men are inherently better at politics than women. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ann | 9/25/2011

    " Interesting read. Not my favorite of the first three books. Dune Messiah was much more complex and involved, but it was still a good read - great to find out about the next generation. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Patrick | 8/4/2011

    " Cyclical climax to the original "Dune" trilogy, but the plots within plots within plots makes for a very convoluted story. Nothing matches Herbert's original. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jessy Ouellette | 7/17/2011

    " This book was better than the second one of the series. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kenton | 5/10/2011

    " I first read this serialized in Analog Science Fiction/Science Fact then bought in paper back "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 B.J. | 5/7/2011

    " It was a lot better than Dune Messiah, but not anywhere near as awesome as the first one. It has me intrigued, so I fully intend to get through the original series by Frank Herbert when I have the chance. I doubt I'll read the new ones by his son and Kevin Anderson, though. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bev | 5/4/2011

    " Not as good as the original Dune. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Philip | 4/13/2011

    " Not nearly as good as the first two books in the series. Too far out there for me to read the remainder of the series. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Ken | 4/11/2011

    " I gave up on Dune after this book. Maybe even partway through this book, I don't recall if I ever finished it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jennifer | 4/7/2011

    " This is one of my more favorite Dune books so far. It had much more of a story and there weren't so many riddles and ambiguities. Fun story to think about. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Barry | 3/31/2011

    " For me this was an excellent follow-up to Dune Messiah, but it wasn't the best of the books. I enjoyed reading about the differences between Paul's children and Paul himself. I did think the end was a little hokey, but it does head right into God Emperor and that was another one of my favorites. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Ben | 3/30/2011

    " I didn't really understand the story too much. I understood that it was about a desert planet that was starting to grow plants and grass. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ian | 3/15/2011

    " If you like the series it is a fun read. I liked it better than dune messiah, but still not nearly as good as the first book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Daniel | 3/8/2011

    " I am currently reading this. I am wondering if I am going to read the next three Dune books. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ruth | 3/6/2011

    " Very good. Liked it a lot better than Dune Messiah. As an audiobook, it had the advantage of not having the Paul reader, whose voice I hate. Looking forward to the next. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cheryl | 2/24/2011

    " Brilliant conclusion to the initial trilogy of the series. Herbert is genius. His universe is so wonderfully developed. "

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About the Author
Author Frank Herbert

Frank Herbert (1920–1986), winner of the Hugo and Nebula awards and a #1 New York Times bestselling author, was born in Tacoma, Washington, and worked as a reporter and later as an editor for a number of West Coast newspapers before becoming a full-time writer. His first science fiction story was published in 1952, but he achieved fame more than ten years later with the publication of “Dune World” and “The Prophet of Dune” in Analog. The stories were amalgamated in the bestselling novel Dune in 1965.

About the Narrators

Simon Vance (a.k.a. Robert Whitfield) is an award-winning actor and an AudioFile Golden Voice with over forty Earphones Awards. He has won thirteen prestigious Audie Awards and was Booklist’s very first Voice of Choice in 2008. He has narrated more than eight hundred audiobooks over almost thirty years, beginning when he was a radio newsreader for the BBC in London.

Scott Brick, actor, narrator, and writer, attended UCLA and spent ten years in a traveling Shakespeare company. Passionate about the spoken word, he has narrated a wide variety of audiobooks, from thrillers and science fiction to classics and nonfiction. He has recorded more than eight hundred audiobooks and won over fifty AudioFile Earphones Awards and several of the prestigious Audie Awards. He was named a Golden Voice by AudioFile magazine and the Voice of Choice for 2016 by Booklist magazine.