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Download Black Hoodie: The Deportees Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Black Hoodie: The Deportees (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Roddy Doyle
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (846 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Roddy Doyle Narrator: Hugh Lee Publisher: AudioGO Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: February 2009 ISBN:
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This is just one of the tales in Roddy Doyle's first-ever collection of stories, The Deportees. They have one thing in common: someone born in Ireland meets someone who has come to live there.

In Black Hoodie, three kids shoplift as an educational service to shopowners, and end up conducting an experiment on racial profiling, getting them an unforseen trip downtown. With empathy and insight, The Deportees in all its stories takes a new slant on the immigrant experience, something of increasing relevance in today's Ireland. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Amanda | 2/16/2014

    " A bit uneven but good--worth it for The New Boy. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Alana | 2/15/2014

    " Hilarious vignettes about the super-accelerated melting pot that is Ireland. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rob | 2/12/2014

    " A great collection of stories dealing primarily with Irish pride and race relations. Ireland has recently become a melting pot of non Irish culture. This book deals with race relations from the Irish perspective. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Selena | 2/11/2014

    " Roddy Doyle must have been hard up for some cash and decided to publish this book. Sad to say, as much as I love him this was not his best. True, this was a collection of short stories that appeared in an Irish newspaper so, of course themes and development had to be truncated but, geez. Why publish a book with the stories? I mean, I was entertained a bit but this was certainly nothing to get excited over. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Margaret Sankey | 1/23/2014

    " Roddy Doyle continues to chronicle the experience of modern Ireland in witty and surprising short stories--among them, a magical-realist, government-commissioned "test of Irishness" meant to weed out emigrants from benefits, but which determines that the most Irish people in Dublin are Polish and Nigerian guest workers. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rose | 1/22/2014

    " This is great for a fun and easy read.... It's been banned from the bedroom as my husband finds my constant giggling annoying.... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Adriana | 1/18/2014

    " Insightful & witty stories that portray the changing population of modern day Ireland ... always funny & entertaining - love Roddy Doyle! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sandy | 1/18/2014

    " Listening on CD. I tried to read Roddy Doyle some years back and couldn't get into it. Listening to the words is preferable, and enjoyable so far. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nan | 12/29/2013

    " An interesting collection of stories. Hugh Lee does a passable job of reading. His accents (especially the American and African ones) are a little over the top. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Maha | 12/18/2013

    " depressing.. realistic and depressing (with, perhaps, the exception of The Pram). But good. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Dennis Willingham | 12/8/2013

    " I love Doyle, and it kills me to only give it 3 stars, but this is not his strongest effort. I was fascinated by the subject and his take on it, but the collection of columns format is not my favorite. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kspencer 75 | 12/6/2013

    " I generally shy away from short stories (something about high school English and excruciating stories that were supposed to inspire) but I picked this up and loved it. So much that I plan to read all Roddy Doyle books offered at the library! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Liz | 10/30/2013

    " Wonderful stories of Ireland as it looks at its changing ethnicity and what it means to be Irish. Very personal look. I listened to it. The story, Deportees is a band put together by Jimmy Rabbit of Committment fame. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 AnnMarie | 10/6/2013

    " Roddy Doyle's voice is one of the most unique in fiction, and this collection of short stories didn't disappoint. All the charm of his best novels of the 1990s packed into pocket-sized narratives that set familiar themes (and a few familiar characters) against a newly evolved backdrop. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Paddy | 6/6/2013

    " Not usually a short story fan, but I really enjoyed these stories, which place the reader in Doyle's Dublin, a place he's brought alive for me. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Aurelia D'andrea | 2/5/2013

    " Another colorful-against-a-grey-backdrop series of stories that made me laugh, shiver under the covers with fear, and feel grateful, yet again, that I didn't move to Ireland. (Though I've enjoyed my visits there!!!) "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Renee | 12/21/2012

    " I couldn't even finish these short stories. Sadly I think Roddy Doyle is no longer interesting... although it is interesting what has happened to Ireland "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Matthew | 10/29/2012

    " Remarkably uneven! The title story is awesome. The one about the test the government comes up with to mark Irishness is dreadful. Most are somewhere in-between. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Nette | 8/12/2012

    " Four stars instead of five only because I don't care for short stories. Roddy Doyle is a feckin god, though. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mary | 7/29/2012

    " There is nobody too f*cked up for Roddy Doyle to love. His love for all humanity always cheers me, gives me hope. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Katy Brandes | 7/16/2012

    " It was surprising for me to not like the title story, especially after having liked "The Barrytown Trilogy" so much. Some of the other stories rang true to my favor of this author. He always gives a clear and convincing voice to his characters. I am always on the lookout for new material from Doyle. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Charlane Brady | 12/25/2011

    " Roddy Doyle is an exceptional writer...this book of short stories is an easy, spunky read but just did not humor me as I was hoping. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Annie | 12/5/2011

    " I love Roddy Doyle! The book was grand! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dejan | 11/5/2011

    " A hilarious and insightful collection of short stories. Roddy Doyle at his best. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jim | 5/12/2011

    " Roddy Doyle is one of my favorite authors. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Daniel | 1/3/2011

    " I'm not usually a fan of short story anthologies -- there is usually too much muck to wade through. But Roddy Doyle has written an engrossing and passionate work that never disappoints. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mike | 11/5/2010

    " Classic Doyle - humour with a powerful message "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dejan | 8/11/2010

    " A hilarious and insightful collection of short stories. Roddy Doyle at his best. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Hal | 6/7/2010

    " Stories about immigrants in Ireland. His dialogue and regular characters always seem very authentic. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Adriana | 5/13/2010

    " Insightful & witty stories that portray the changing population of modern day Ireland ... always funny & entertaining - love Roddy Doyle! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Julie | 5/13/2010

    " A chance to revisit Jimmy Rabbitt (the goofy promoter from "The Commitments") and enjoy a truly masterful short story writer. Grand. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Annie | 4/9/2010

    " I love Roddy Doyle! The book was grand! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Maha | 2/8/2010

    " depressing.. realistic and depressing (with, perhaps, the exception of The Pram). But good. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Ray1759 | 1/9/2010

    " I think I expected a little more from this book, based on Roddy Doyle's previous books. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Paul | 11/14/2009

    " Some great stories here, but given the constrained format, some were better than others. Still, Doyle is one of the few contemporary writers I really admire. He has a way of getting inside his characters' skin that is uncanny--and wholly convincing. "

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About the Author
Author Roddy Doyle

Roddy Doyle is an Irish novelist, dramatist, and screenwriter. He is a recipient of the Irish PEN Award for Literature, and his novel Paddy Clarke Ha-Ha won the Man Booker Prize in 1993. Several of his books have been made into successful films, beginning with The Commitments in 1991. 

About the Narrator

Hugh Lee has worked extensively in theater and television. He starred in the West End in Stones in His Pockets, played Yolland in the Abbey Theatre’s production of Translations, and played Thurio in The Two Gentlemen of Verona. His television appearances include Bad Girls, Just William, Doctors, and Bugs.