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Extended Audio Sample The Dead Republic Audiobook, by Roddy Doyle Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (352 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Roddy Doyle Narrator: Gerard Doyle Publisher: Recorded Books, LLC Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Related: The Last Roundup Series Release Date: April 2010 ISBN: 9781449837808
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The triumphant conclusion to the trilogy that began with A Star Called Henry.

Henry Smart is back. It is 1946, and Henry has crawled into the desert of Utah’s Monument Valley to die. He’s stumbled onto a film set though, and ends up in Hollywood collaborating with John Ford on a script based on his life. Eventually, Henry finds himself back in Ireland, where he becomes a custodian, and meets up with a woman who may or may not be his long-lost wife. After being injured in a political bombing in Dublin, the secret of his rebel past comes out, and Henry is a national hero. Or are his troubles just beginning? Raucous, colorful, and epic, The Dead Republic is the magnificent final act in the life of one of Doyle’s most unforgettable characters.

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Quotes & Awards

  • “If you don’t already know Henry Smart, The Dead Republic is an excellent place to meet him—because it’s the best of Doyle’s trilogy and because in it Henry reviews his past while serving as Ford’s consultant for a movie about the Irish revolution…A thoughtful book about a sometimes thoughtless political process.”

    New York Times

  • “The story of Henry’s reintegration into a much changed Ireland is thoroughly absorbing.”

    New Yorker

  • “Doyle’s inventive mix of genuine film history and manic storytelling sets up his novel’s powerful central themes: What does it mean to be Irish? Who decides?…It may have taken a while for Henry Smart to get back to Ireland, but in the end it was worth the wait.”

    Toronto Star

  • “In The Dead Republic, Henry’s violent, often comic collisions with history continue…Henry Smart remains one of Roddy Doyle’s great characters. Funny, laconic, profane, he spits back every role history force-feeds him.”

    Globe and Mail (Toronto)

  • “Doyle retains his canny and surprising eye, his gift for the corporeal…Doyle is a master of [dialogue].”

    Guardian (London)

  • The Dead Republic harbors some lovely writing to go with the book’s magnificent theme…A fine…farewell to one of the more memorable protagonists in recent literature.”

    Denver Post

  • “Doyle exhibits a peerless ear for cynicism as he grapples with the violence and farce of Irish history.”

    Publishers Weekly

  • “Readers will want to tune in to see what fate awaits the irrepressible Irishman.”

    Booklist

  • “A thought-provoking account of the mythology surrounding modern Irish history.”

    Bookmarks

Listener Opinions

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 R.J. | 2/17/2014

    " Maybe because I didn't read the first two I couldn't get into it although it was set in Hollywood and was about the filming of The Quiet Man. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 A. Mary Murphy | 2/7/2014

    " Henry is an old man now. One absolute treat for me is the development of "The Quiet Man" storyline. I've read the story that supposedly was adapted as the movie, and they have almost nothing in common, beyond the title. Doyle fills in the gaping divide with vivid skill. The book is a satisfying conclusion to the star that is Henry. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tim and Popie Stafford | 2/6/2014

    " The third in the trilogy, beginning with A Star Called Henry and Oh, Play That Thing. I don't like these nearly so much as his earlier works (which I love). It's much more mechanical, and the emotions are hidden deep under the surface. I think Doyle, a wonderful writer, has gone off on the wrong direction. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Larry Scarzfava | 1/14/2014

    " This book was nothing at all like the other two in the trilogy. Doyle should have quit while he was ahead! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tilly Mint | 1/14/2014

    " The final part in the trilogy of Henry Smart, bringing us back to Ireland and right up to the modern day. I have loved these three books, and feel a genuine affection for Henry Smart - due to Doyle's wonderful story telling. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Vivian Valvano | 1/5/2014

    " This is the third part of the trilogy that began with A STAR CALLED HENRY which I didn't like. I didn't read the second book. I read the third because I saw that it involved Henry working with John Ford on "The Quiet Man" and becoming angry when his republican story was not the one that was told in the film. And his tale moves on from there. Despite the facts that Doyle obviously knows so much about the controversies about "The Quiet Man" and so much about 20th-century Irish history (and about Ernie O'Malley, who really did consult with John Ford on the film) - and incorporates his knowledge into Henry's life story, all I can say is, "It was ok." "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Ciaran Mcfadden | 12/25/2013

    " I really enjoyed a star called henry and play that thing was a decent enough book .. the dead republic though is just bewildering. The storylines are so far fetched and the writing turgid, that it's hard to believe this is a book by Roddy Doyle. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Angela Joyce | 12/24/2013

    " Well, that was fairly mind-blowing. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jack Goodstein | 12/19/2013

    " Third of a trilogy finds Henry Smart Irish independence fighter accidently tied up with Hollywood as a source for John Ford's "The Quiet Man" and then back in Ireland to become an icon of the revolution. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Paddy | 11/16/2013

    " I love so many of Doyle books, but this Henry trilogy baffles me. Not in a good way. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Debbie | 6/27/2013

    " This is the third book of a trilogy about the life of an IRA fighter named Henry. The first two books were A Star Called Henry and Oh, Play That Thing. Very readable with more than a touch of Irish sardonic irony that was also evident in his book The Commitments. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Tim | 3/14/2013

    " Pace too slow. Too boring for my taste. I tried to get through this, but I kept falling asleep. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 clogsilk | 2/28/2013

    " Taken me three years to finish it. Not a great sign! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Wendy | 2/26/2013

    " Intense, very intense. Makes the implausible action so real!! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dejan | 8/1/2012

    " A beautiful book. Don't read it before reading other books in "The Last Round trilogy". "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Tim | 3/13/2012

    " Roddy Doyle has written some of my favorite books. This one is a terrible disappointment. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Doug | 2/24/2012

    " Not my style -- sounded like a fun premise, but I lost interest within the first 50 pages and chose not to finish it. It definitely didn't work as a standalone novel. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bill | 9/1/2011

    " This is Roddy Doyle's concluding volume of his trilogy ("A Star Called Henry" & "Oh Play that Thing") and his best. All three feature Henry Smart, all three are excellent reads. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rita | 6/23/2011

    " This is one of the most profound and interesting series of books I have ever read. These books explore the history of Ireland, the IRA and love. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sarah | 6/14/2011

    " A challenging but interesting read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tenli | 6/7/2011

    " The final episode did not disappoint, although it bogged down a bit towards the end. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Larry | 3/20/2011

    " This book was nothing at all like the other two in the trilogy. Doyle should have quit while he was ahead! "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Paddy | 3/14/2011

    " I love so many of Doyle books, but this Henry trilogy baffles me. Not in a good way. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Wendy | 1/30/2011

    " Intense, very intense. Makes the implausible action so real!! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Debbie | 1/13/2011

    " This is the third book of a trilogy about the life of an IRA fighter named Henry. The first two books were A Star Called Henry and Oh, Play That Thing. Very readable with more than a touch of Irish sardonic irony that was also evident in his book The Commitments. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Joanne | 9/18/2010

    " Despite what critics say, I did not enjoy this book as much as the previous two Henry novels. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dejan | 8/11/2010

    " A beautiful book. Don't read it before reading other books in "The Last Round trilogy". "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kevin | 6/26/2010

    " Really, one of Doyle's best books. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Alexa | 6/23/2010

    " I had been waiting for this book to come out for years, and while it was horribly depressing, it beautifully wraps up the themes of the trilogy - particularly the mutability of history. It would be very difficult to read the trilogy without a basic knowledge of 20th century Irish history. "

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About the Author
Author Roddy Doyle

Roddy Doyle is an Irish novelist, dramatist, and screenwriter. He is a recipient of the Irish PEN Award for Literature, and his novel Paddy Clarke Ha-Ha won the Man Booker Prize in 1993. Several of his books have been made into successful films, beginning with The Commitments in 1991. 

About the Narrator

Gerard Doyle, award-winning narrator, was born of Irish parents and raised and educated in England. In Great Britain he has enjoyed an extensive career in both television and repertory theater and toured nationally and internationally with the English Shakespeare Company. He has appeared in London’s West End in the gritty musical The Hired Man. In America he has appeared on Broadway in The Weir and on television in New York Undercover and Law & Order. A seasoned narrator, he has been awarded thirty-one AudioFile Earphones Awards, was named a Best Voice in Young Adult Fiction in 2008, and won the prestigious Audie Award for best narration in 2006 for The Dead Yard by Adrian McKinty.