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Download April 4, 1968: Martin Luther King Jr.'s Death and How It Changed America Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample April 4, 1968: Martin Luther King Jr.s Death and How It Changed America Audiobook, by Michael Eric Dyson Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (158 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Michael Eric Dyson Narrator: Michael Eric Dyson Publisher: Blackstone Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: January 2006 ISBN: 9781455190836
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On April 4, 1968, Martin Luther King, Jr., the prophet for racial and economic justice in America, was fatally shot while standing on the balcony of a Memphis hotel. Only hours earlier, he had ended his final public speech with the words, “I may not get there with you, but I want you to know tonight, that we as a people will get to the Promised Land.” In this impactful book, acclaimed public intellectual Michael Eric Dyson offers a comprehensive reevaluation of the fate of America, specifically Black America, since that date. Ambitiously and controversially, he investigates the ways in which we as a people have made it to that Promised Land King spoke of, and the many areas in which we still have a long way to go. April 4, 1968 takes a sweeping view of King’s death, remembering all the toil, triumph, and tribulation that led to that fateful date while anticipating the ways in which King’s legacy will affect the future of this country.

This celebration of King’s leadership challenges America to renew its commitment to his vision.

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Quotes & Awards

  • “With deep, resonant projection that at times sounds eerily like Martin Luther King, Jr.’s, own voice, Dyson narrates his deep exploration into the most significant aspects of King’s legacy since his assassination on April 4, 1968…Even when not echoing King’s cadence and intonation, Dyson delivers a strong narrative performance that illuminates his belief in King’s dream.”

    AudioFile

  • “Dyson delivers a strong narrative performance that illuminates his belief in King’s dream.”

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  • A Washington Post Bestseller

Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 karen | 1/13/2014

    " i give it four stars, because it's well-written and compelling. however, i just don't have the attention span right now to actually finish this wordy book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jill | 12/6/2013

    " Okay, just finished the audiobook. I really like Dyson's writing, and I learned a lot of surprising information about the big players in the Black civil rights movement. (Al Sharpton and James Brown were BFFs. Huh.). But the last part is really weird, where Dyson imagines a conversation with the didn't-die version of King. I want to linguistically explore Dyson's concept of automortology further. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lee | 10/14/2013

    " So far, I'm enjoying his reading of King's rhetoric as largely automortological. I hadn't thought of King's speeches in this way before. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Michael Glover | 10/1/2013

    " April 4, 1968 was a powerful book written by Michael Eric Dyson. After reading this book, I learned more about Martin the man as opposed to the traditional. This book was very detailed and full of good information. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jay McCann | 7/4/2013

    " I saw this author on CNN's "Black in America" documentary. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mariama | 6/8/2013

    " A chance to learn more about MLK and reflect on his legacy is a welcomed opportunity. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Michelle | 6/7/2013

    " an interesting exposure to a part of culture I wasn't greatly familiar with. Touched not only King but Obama, Sharpton, Jackson, etc "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Elizabeth | 11/26/2012

    " dyson says he's trying to humanize king. could have fooled me. enough with his personal morality, plz. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Christopher Clinton | 2/20/2012

    " An in depth look at the death of MLK and the behind the scenes power struggle of the prominent men who took up the struggle for the leadership of the black cause. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jarred Lawrence | 1/13/2012

    " A very interesting sociological look into the impact MLK Jr's assassination had on black and white America. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Caroline | 9/22/2011

    " I liked this a lot even though I wasn't his core audience. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mary | 7/17/2010

    " I'm currently listening to this on CD. Completely fascinating. I want to go back and listen to his book on the life of MLK. I've read so much on race, interviewed so many black friends, and yet the more I learn, the more I feel I have to learn. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Heather | 2/7/2010

    " I just learned a little more about MLK than just the I Have a Dream speach. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Adam | 12/23/2009

    " Dyson made some interesting points about King's death and it's impact on society, especially African American society. It was not the best book ever, but fairly interesting. The interview at the end was questionable... "

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About the Author
Author Michael Eric DysonMICHAEL ERIC DYSON is one of America’s premier public intellectuals. He occupies the distinguished position of University Professor of Sociology at Georgetown University, is a contributing opinion writer for the New York Times, and is a contributing editor of The New Republic and ESPN’s The Undefeated. Ebony magazine named him one of the 100 Most Influential African Americans and one of the 150 most powerful blacks in the nation.