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Download Age of Innocence (Dramatised) Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Age of Innocence (Dramatised) Audiobook, by Edith Wharton
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (53,881 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Edith Wharton Narrator: Andrew Wincott, Susanne Bertish Publisher: AudioGO Format: Original Staging Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: October 2010 ISBN:
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A full-cast dramatisation of Edith Wharton's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel about a passionate love affair that breaks all the rules of the restrictive high society of 1870s New York.

In the exclusive world of upper-class New York, in which attendance at balls and dinners passes for occupation, Newland Archer anticipates his marriage to May Welland, a beautiful young girl from a suitable family 'who knows nothing and expects everything'. Into this well-ordered community May's cousin, the captivating and exotic Countess Olenska, arrives. She has returned from Europe after the collapse of her marriage and alternately enchants and outrages New York society with her cosmopolitan lifestyle. Newland is sympathetic to her escape from a loveless marriage, and as his sympathy deepens into love he not only gains insight into the brutality of society's treatment of women, but also discovers the real anguish of loving outside its rules.

Dramatised by Jane Rogers, starring Andrew Wincott and Susanne Bertish.

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Court Ellyn | 2/9/2014

    " This is one I will read again one day. Usually, when I wrote a detailed paper on a book, I was sick of it that I never wanted to see it again. Not so "The Age of Innocence." A powerful read, vivid and heartbreaking. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Catherine Blass | 1/26/2014

    " Definitely one of my favorite American novels...in large part because it demonstrated qualities of British literature (my fave), focusing on problems within the upperclass. Definitely a great book and well-worth the read. The characters (Newland Archer and Ellen Olenska) remind me of Catherine and Heathcliff (Wuthering Heights): extremely passionate, dependent on each other for their identity, outsiders. Great novel. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 peaseblossom | 1/20/2014

    " A lot less raw than The House of Mirth, and therefore, I think, a very different read depending on your own assumptions. For example, I notice that many reviewers agree with Newland's assessment of May, when it's clear that Newland isn't nearly as perceptive as he thinks he is (and obviously she is a boss). "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Filipe | 1/5/2014

    " An insight picture of New York's 1870's upper class. Wharton is a master at describing habits,traditions, mannerisms and lifestyle. Alongside that the drama of a man and a womam who want to do it all right, thinking they're doing it wrong just to know at the very end that society never plays by it's own rules and that it never forgives. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Pamela Sikorski | 1/4/2014

    " Sad. But. Lovelytakes place during a time of grace and gentility. Women were such victims of their situations, so sad and during this period people were so judgmental and so unforgiving. I enjoyed the details of the privileged lifestyle. But I was hoping they would get together. Not to be. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Vicki | 1/1/2014

    " Good story of the pressures of New York society after WWI. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Greg | 11/28/2013

    " Saw a play last weekend about a book club. Wharton & "Age" were heavily referenced and this being one of my LitGaps (tm), when I ran across a copy on the shelf Wednesday, I thought it was time. It was. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Eng Soly | 10/11/2013

    " What I did really recall from this poor reading is how old America was like and how did people in that era think and reacted to society around them. At last I need to only say... what was that ending!!! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jen Barwinski | 7/23/2013

    " I didn't like this nearly as much as "The House of Mirth," but it was good. A bit slow getting started, but I really liked it by the end. I'm just going to say it, I couldn't stand May, even though I should feel sorry for her. She was manipulative and just vapid. But anyway, good book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kim Bewick | 7/14/2013

    " Perfection on every level-literary, narrative, prosaic, insightfulness. Genius. Gorgeous. Delicious. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Miri | 7/14/2013

    " At times I found it heavy to read but it's a good story with with a lot subtlety. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Alayna | 3/22/2013

    " Normally, I think I would like this book. The writing was excellent, but it was sooooo repetitive! So, New York in the 1870s had strict social rules for the upper class that could feel oppressive - I get it already! I read 1/3 of the book and then gave up. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Blair | 7/14/2012

    " Loved it! I love the mix of old-fashioned paired with sentiments that still ring so true in today's world. Who hasn't felt hemmed in by their choices or other people's expectations of you? A delightful read and a perfect example of why some books are "classics." "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rita Tiwari | 6/10/2012

    " I enjoyed the book, but was rather disappointed by the last chapter. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Juliana | 3/16/2012

    " It's rare to read satire of a society gone by and still find it funny and biting. This is Wharton's gift. The story itself fell a little flat, though. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jerilyn Polson | 2/19/2012

    " Some people and situations are not so different fron the non-communicating, "proper" society. Sad. I can see why Edith Wharton received the 1921 Pulitzer for this work. Now I'm curious about the movie. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Chelsea Pope | 10/5/2011

    " Possibly my favorite book to read this last quarter, insane detail. Newland's a bit of a pansy. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Willow4 | 5/18/2011

    " I have read this book before and enjoyed it very much "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Patricia | 5/15/2011

    " Just one of my all time favorite books. The social pressures and the outcomes that result are timeless. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Pylgrym | 5/15/2011

    " Equal parts love and pain. Exquisite. The best of the best. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kathy | 5/13/2011

    " My grand daughter read this book in her high school class last year. I realized that I had never read it. As I read it and thoroughly enjoyed it, I wondered at girls of today trying to understand the constraints of society way back when. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Alicia | 5/12/2011

    " Well-written story, but not my favorite story line. I don't usually enjoy stories all about social status and married people who long to be with someone who is not their spouse (well, with the one exception of Gone with the Wind!). "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Dawnia | 5/12/2011

    " I didn't care for the twisted love story. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Amie | 5/11/2011

    " This book is an old favorite. I reread it every so often, and never get bored of it. I love Edith Wharton's subtle, skillful way of telling a story, and pulling the reader into its world. I love that I am still in suspense, even knowing exactly how it will end. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 John | 5/7/2011

    " Great look at NY society and manners at the start of the 20th century. The relationship between Newland Archer and Countess Ellen Olenska is a bit frustrating. All propriety is maintained in the end! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 DiDi | 5/6/2011

    " This made a great discussion for bookclub. I admit that the first half was slow reading for me, but the second half picked up and I was anxious to see how events played out. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Atw74 | 5/5/2011

    " One of my absolutely favorite books. Just perfect. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kristen | 5/3/2011

    " I'm glad I took the time to read The Age of Innocence. I did not expect the ending (which is good!). If you're going to pick up a Wharton novel, I'd start with Ethan Frome or The Bunner Sisters before reading The Age of Innocence. "

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About the Author
Author Edith Wharton

Edith Wharton (1862–1937) was born in New York and is best known for her stories of life among the upper-class society into which she was born. She was educated privately at home and in Europe. In 1894 she began writing fiction, and her novel The House of Mirth established her as a leading writer. Her novels The Age of Innocence and Old New York were each awarded the Pulitzer Prize. She was the first woman to receive that honor. In 1929 she was awarded the American Academy of Arts and Letters Gold Medal for Fiction.