Download Against Depression (Abridged) Audiobook

Against Depression (Abridged) Audiobook, by Peter D. Kramer Extended Sample Click for printable size audiobook cover
Author: Peter D. Kramer Narrator: Peter D. Kramer Publisher: Penguin Random House Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: February 2005 ISBN: 9780786553471
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (238 ratings) (rate this audio book)
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In his landmark bestseller Listening to Prozac, Peter Kramer revolutionized the way we think about antidepressants and the culture in which they are so widely used. Now Kramer offers a frank and unflinching look at the condition those medications treat: depression. Definitively refuting our notions of "heroic melancholy," he walks readers through groundbreaking new research—studies that confirm depression's status as a devastating disease and suggest pathways toward resilience. Thought-provoking and enlightening, Against Depression provides a bold revision of our understanding of mood disorder and promises hope to the millions who suffer from it. Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • Our treasured sense of self is often challenged by neuroscience—how do you wedge 'Self' in among neurons and synapses and neurotransmitters? No one has written about these issues in a more sensitive, thought-provoking and accessible way, and has touched more people in the process, than Peter Kramer. Robert Sapolsky, Professor of Biological Sciences, Stanford University

  • An eloquent, absorbing book. The New York Times Book Review

    "Deeply felt... [Kramer's] book is a polemic against a society that accepts depression as a fact of life.

  • Kramer makes an eloquent case for considering depression a disease... Captivating, convincing and thorough. San Francisco Chronicle
  • In Against Depression, Peter Kramer opens our eyes once again to a fresh, important and humane understanding of the human condition. His bold rethinking of the condition we call 'depression' gives us a clear-eyed scenario for freedom from the grip of this soul-searing disorder. Daniel Goleman, author of Emotional Intelligence
  • There is nothing romantic in the suffering of depression. Kramer shows us the horrific reality of the illness, dispelling myths that pervade popular culture. This book should usher in an era when the disordered chemistry of the brain is viewed with the same concern and care that mark the treatment of any malady. Jerome Groopman, Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
  • Here one of our most thoughtful psychiatrists attends a wide-spread psychological malady—the bouts of melancholy that afflict so many individuals, laying them low in mind and spirit. This book offers much critical wisdom, even as it is written with a grace and sensitivity that will endear its words to the reader. Robert Coles, Professor of Psychiatry and Medical Humanities, Harvard Medical School

Listener Reviews

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  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Felicia | 1/6/2014

    " Kramer makes the case for depression as a purely biological illness, driven by nature rather than nurture. He also argues against the time-honored practice of romanticizing depression, tying it to the arts and to creativity. It's an interesting book, although a bit longer than it needs to be. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Joselynn | 12/8/2013

    " Kinda dry writing but the research is interesting. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 trickgnosis | 12/1/2013

    " Can a book that crushes you with the weight of recognition also be liberating? I sure hope so. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nicole | 11/21/2013

    " I was already against depression, and this is not as gripping (though more carefully and thoughtfully written and researched) as 'Talking to Prozac,' but it does make the important point that mental illness is the only disease we romanticize and suggest not-treating. TAKE YOUR MEDS. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Aaron | 11/3/2013

    " Next. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Anthoferjea | 11/2/2013

    " I'd read Listening to Prozac first. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kristina | 10/6/2013

    " Meh. Not much I didn't already know, and not a super engaging read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Matthew | 10/5/2013

    " With a command of art, literature and his chosen profession of psychiatry, Kramer makes a compelling argument that depression has been romanticized throughout modern culture and shouldn't be. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Erin | 3/17/2013

    " Another counseling course book. He makes a decent argument against the overuse of medication for depression and how many people often do not continue therapy with the medication, which should go hand in hand. A good read for anyone battling depression. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sarah | 9/10/2012

    " both affirming and depressing "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Malbadeen | 6/29/2012

    " How depressing!....and annoyingly compelling, I wanted to leave the topic behind but keept being drawn back in with more questions. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Saleem | 12/13/2011

    " Good book for any one interested in depression, gives a different insight but longer than it should and I found it for unknown reason a bit Narcissistic. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kristina | 2/3/2011

    " Meh. Not much I didn't already know, and not a super engaging read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bryan | 3/1/2010

    " Best book I've read on the subject. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 trickgnosis | 2/11/2010

    " Can a book that crushes you with the weight of recognition also be liberating? I sure hope so. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Saleem | 12/6/2009

    " Good book for any one interested in depression, gives a different insight but longer than it should and I found it for unknown reason a bit Narcissistic. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Matthew | 9/28/2009

    " With a command of art, literature and his chosen profession of psychiatry, Kramer makes a compelling argument that depression has been romanticized throughout modern culture and shouldn't be. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Joselynn | 6/28/2009

    " Kinda dry writing but the research is interesting. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Felicia | 9/14/2008

    " Kramer makes the case for depression as a purely biological illness, driven by nature rather than nurture. He also argues against the time-honored practice of romanticizing depression, tying it to the arts and to creativity. It's an interesting book, although a bit longer than it needs to be. "

About the Author

Peter D. Kramer is a clinical professor of psychiatry and human behavior at Brown University. He often criticizes society for romanticizing depression in the same way that tuberculosis was once romanticized. He is the author of Should You Leave? and the international bestseller Listening to Prozac. He lives and practices in Providence, Rhode Island.