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Download Against Depression Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Against Depression Audiobook, by Peter D. Kramer
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (238 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Peter D. Kramer Narrator: Peter D. Kramer Publisher: Penguin Audiobooks Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: April 2005 ISBN:
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A decade ago, with his breakaway best seller, Listening to Prozac, Peter Kramer revolutionized the way we think about antidepressants and the culture in which they are so widely used. Now, he returns with a profound and original look at the condition those medications treat, depression. He asks: If we could eradicate depression so that no human being ever suffered it again, would we?

Depression, linked in our culture to a long tradition of heroic melancholy, is often understood as ennobling, a source of soulfulness and creativity. Tracing this belief from Aristotle to the Romantics to Picasso, and to present-day memoirs of mood disorder, Kramer suggests that the pervasiveness of the illness has distorted our sense of what it is to be human. There is nothing heroic about depression, Kramer argues, and he presents the latest scientific findings to support the fact that depression is a disease, one that can have far-reaching health effects on its sufferers.

Frank and unflinching, Against Depression is a deeply felt, deeply moving book, grounded in time spent with the depressed. As his argument unfolds, Kramer becomes a crusader, the author of a compassionate polemic that is fiercely against depression and the devastation it causes. Like Listening to Prozac, Against Depression will offer hope to millions who suffer from depression, and radically alter the debate on its treatment. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Felicia | 1/6/2014

    " Kramer makes the case for depression as a purely biological illness, driven by nature rather than nurture. He also argues against the time-honored practice of romanticizing depression, tying it to the arts and to creativity. It's an interesting book, although a bit longer than it needs to be. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Joselynn | 12/8/2013

    " Kinda dry writing but the research is interesting. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 trickgnosis | 12/1/2013

    " Can a book that crushes you with the weight of recognition also be liberating? I sure hope so. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nicole | 11/21/2013

    " I was already against depression, and this is not as gripping (though more carefully and thoughtfully written and researched) as 'Talking to Prozac,' but it does make the important point that mental illness is the only disease we romanticize and suggest not-treating. TAKE YOUR MEDS. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Aaron Sells | 11/3/2013

    " Next. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Anthoferjea | 11/2/2013

    " I'd read Listening to Prozac first. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kristina | 10/6/2013

    " Meh. Not much I didn't already know, and not a super engaging read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Matthew | 10/5/2013

    " With a command of art, literature and his chosen profession of psychiatry, Kramer makes a compelling argument that depression has been romanticized throughout modern culture and shouldn't be. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Erin Smith | 3/17/2013

    " Another counseling course book. He makes a decent argument against the overuse of medication for depression and how many people often do not continue therapy with the medication, which should go hand in hand. A good read for anyone battling depression. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sarah | 9/10/2012

    " both affirming and depressing "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Malbadeen | 6/29/2012

    " How depressing!....and annoyingly compelling, I wanted to leave the topic behind but keept being drawn back in with more questions. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Saleem Khashan | 12/13/2011

    " Good book for any one interested in depression, gives a different insight but longer than it should and I found it for unknown reason a bit Narcissistic. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kristina | 2/3/2011

    " Meh. Not much I didn't already know, and not a super engaging read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bryan | 3/1/2010

    " Best book I've read on the subject. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 trickgnosis | 2/11/2010

    " Can a book that crushes you with the weight of recognition also be liberating? I sure hope so. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Saleem | 12/6/2009

    " Good book for any one interested in depression, gives a different insight but longer than it should and I found it for unknown reason a bit Narcissistic. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Matthew | 9/28/2009

    " With a command of art, literature and his chosen profession of psychiatry, Kramer makes a compelling argument that depression has been romanticized throughout modern culture and shouldn't be. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Joselynn | 6/28/2009

    " Kinda dry writing but the research is interesting. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Felicia | 9/14/2008

    " Kramer makes the case for depression as a purely biological illness, driven by nature rather than nurture. He also argues against the time-honored practice of romanticizing depression, tying it to the arts and to creativity. It's an interesting book, although a bit longer than it needs to be. "

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About the Author

Peter D. Kramer is a clinical professor of psychiatry and human behavior at Brown University. He often criticizes society for romanticizing depression in the same way that tuberculosis was once romanticized. He is the author of Should You Leave? and the international bestseller Listening to Prozac. He lives and practices in Providence, Rhode Island.