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3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (643 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Peter D. Kramer Narrator: Peter D. Kramer Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: April 1994 ISBN: 9780743549783
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THE END OF PERSONALITY?

Since it was introduce in 1987, the antidepressant Prozac has been prescribed to nearly five million Americans. But what is Prozac? Reported to turn shy people into social butterflies and to improve work performance, memory, even dexterity, Prozac has changed millions of troubled lives -- but not without raising troubling questions of interest to anyone who has ever tried to improve his or her life.

Is Prozac a medication, or a mental steroid...a cure for illness, or a chemical agent for cosmetic character change? In many cases, Prozac can make people more attractive, energetic and socially acceptable -- whether they're "ill" or not. But when a pill can appear to accomplish the work of countless therapy sessions, seminars and self-help books and tapes, have we entered an age where pharmacological advances could make our notions of character, personality and selfhood obsolete?

In the bestselling tradition of The Man Who Mistook His Wife for His Hat, psychiatrist Peter Kramer reads his bestselling, critically acclaimed exploration of these and other issues that sparked a national debate. Drawing on both dramatic case studies and the perceptions of a uniquely insightful thinker contemplating a cultural crossroads, Listening to Prozac will forever change the way you think of the human condition. Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • “An intelligent and informative book.” 

    New York Times

  • “Tackles the complicated implications and assumptions of modern psychiatry.” 

    New Daily News

  • “A provocative and insightful exploration of Prozac’s dramatic and unforeseen impact on the human psyche, as well as the practice of psychotherapy.” 

    San Francisco Chronicle

  • “Listening to Prozac is a marvelous antidote to suggestions that psychiatric thinking has not progressed much beyond Freud.

    American Journal of Psychiatry

  • “Not only a fascinating and beautifully written overview of the biology and psychology of mood-state, but a richly philosophical meditation upon the basic nature of human nature as well.”

    Maggie Scarf

  • New York Times Bestseller

Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ariadna73 | 2/19/2014

    " In the future we will not only dress our bodies every morning; but also take our pill to makeup our minds to go and fit with the society :-( "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kathy | 2/15/2014

    " One of the first books I read about the real possibility of designing personality. Full of useful information about depression and antidepressants, too. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Beth | 2/7/2014

    " Highly interesting look at the emergence of Prozac and its possible implications for the history of psychiatry. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kenneth E. Harrison, Jr. | 1/28/2014

    " I still plan to write a broadway musical based on the book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rae | 1/22/2014

    " This book created quite a splash when it was published as antidepressants seemed to be all the rage and the author took aim at the most commonly prescribed ones. He describes not only the dangers of the drugs but the effect they are having on our society as a whole. Though this was a bit sensationalistic, I still enjoyed it and learned enough to be wary of these medications. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 chubs | 1/19/2014

    " Kramer is a seemingly earnest apologist for the widespread use of SSRIs not only to make people well, but "better than well." He plays up the positives he's observed but doesn't address the negatives very well. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lp | 1/13/2014

    " This book opened my eyes to a lot about depression, drugs, and the concept of self. It also made me wander around mentally prescribing Prozac to everyone around me, including myself! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sherry Forschen | 1/2/2014

    " This exploration of antidepressants was extremely well written and understandable! Glad I read it! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Rebecca Goldberg | 12/13/2013

    " Not quite what I was expecting. Way too dry and medical; perhaps better for a psychiatrist than a social worker. I ended up reading, then skimming, then dropping it. It wasn't worth reading after a while. Also a bit out-dated. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 John McElhenney | 10/14/2013

    " Kramer turns the psycho-pharma industry on its ear and wonders if we are better off using drugs like prozac to make type-a players out of all of us. A philosophical book, Kramer takes a hard look at what we are doing with designer drugs. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anne Kadet | 7/7/2013

    " More confused than ever, but that's okay. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Mommalibrarian | 12/13/2010

    " starts of interesting then just gets padded to book length. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Flat | 10/31/2010

    " Kramer is a seemingly earnest apologist for the widespread use of SSRIs not only to make people well, but "better than well." He plays up the positives he's observed but doesn't address the negatives very well. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lisa | 10/14/2010

    " so far fasckinating. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Deborah | 10/3/2010

    " I lost interest and did not finish but liked the beginning a lot "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kelli | 9/7/2010

    " This book was really instrumental in the writing of my Honor's Thesis. The author's description of the phenomenon of "kindling" has stuck with me in my work to this day. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 missemmamm | 6/14/2010

    " just started, already fascinating "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 BAKU | 4/27/2010

    " Putting people on prozac produces results the same as 10-20 years of therapy. Guess that's the end of ' the talking cure ' ( ? ) "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Deborah | 4/27/2010

    " I lost interest and did not finish but liked the beginning a lot "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Beth | 3/26/2010

    " Highly interesting look at the emergence of Prozac and its possible implications for the history of psychiatry. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jmacofearth | 8/7/2008

    " Kramer turns the psycho-pharma industry on its ear and wonders if we are better off using drugs like prozac to make type-a players out of all of us. A philosophical book, Kramer takes a hard look at what we are doing with designer drugs. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kathy | 7/12/2008

    " One of the first books I read about the real possibility of designing personality. Full of useful information about depression and antidepressants, too. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rachel | 6/23/2008

    " "Depression is the opposite of freedom" is a quote from the book. This book is full of thoughts for both the layman and the professional. Kramer begins what needs to become an open dialogue between professionals and consumers. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Mommalibrarian | 4/19/2008

    " starts of interesting then just gets padded to book length. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kelli | 12/8/2007

    " This book was really instrumental in the writing of my Honor's Thesis. The author's description of the phenomenon of "kindling" has stuck with me in my work to this day. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Cavolonero | 9/20/2007

    " Putting people on prozac produces results the same as 10-20 years of therapy. Guess that's the end of ' the talking cure ' ( ? ) "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 amy | 9/8/2007

    " i read the 1993 viking edition. "

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About the Author

Peter D. Kramer is a clinical professor of psychiatry and human behavior at Brown University. He often criticizes society for romanticizing depression in the same way that tuberculosis was once romanticized. He is the author of Should You Leave? and the international bestseller Listening to Prozac. He lives and practices in Providence, Rhode Island.