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Download A Separate Peace Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample A Separate Peace, by John Knowles
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (88,469 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: John Knowles Narrator: Matthew Modine Publisher: Bantam Doubleday Dell Audio Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date:
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Ever since its first publication in 1960, A Separate Peace has been hailed as a modern classic. Now the story of two best friends attending a New England boarding school during World War II comes to life in this powerful audio presentation. Featuring a dramatic reading by Matthew Modine, this abridgment of John Knowles's critically acclaimed novel provides a startling insight into war and youth that you will never forget.

Gene Fowler is a lonely, introverted intellectual. Phineas is a handsome, charismatic, daredevil athlete. Their bittersweet rivalry leads to a tragic accident during the ill-fated summer of '42 - one that will disrupt the uneasy peace of their artificial oasis and force them to accept the grim realities of manhood. The story of their unique friendship is a starkly moving parable of lost innocence and tortured adolescence in a generation coming of age during the dark years of war.

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 by Don | 2/20/2014

    " "...this was my sarcastic summer. It was only long after that I recognized sarcasm as the protest of people who are weak." "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 by Ian Hrabe | 2/1/2014

    " A good high school boy novel that is deceptively complicated. I mean, the whole thing does scream "TEACH ME IN HIGH SCHOOL AP ENGLISH" but that's a good thing. It's an easy read, full of symbolism and themes and all that stuff teachers need to teach you about. I read this because I desperately want to make up for my laziness in 9th grade. For not wanting to do the summer reading, and thus plodding through easy peasy English classes for my entire High School career and then having to pay out the ass for the same damn thing in college. Because I didn't want to read. Because I didn't start reading until second semester of 9th grade. But I didn't want to read this. And I didn't want to read "Lord of the Flies." And now I really want to read them. Well, I guess I read this one. And enjoyed it, but maybe because I love that upscale boy's school setting. And I loved the constant shadow of death hanging over them, and the fact that all of these boys are receiving the highest education for what? To go to the war and die on the front lines? There's a beautiful scene at the end of the book where Brinker Hadley's father gives Gene Forrester a dirty look for wanting to just ride the war out. To not go to the frontlines. To survive. And the dude just tells him that those frontline memories are going to be important some day, and that people might look down on him if they find out he didn't want to go. Whatever. It was a brilliant little part that tied the whole book together, and shows that the peace mentioned throughout like a heavy fist is something that must endure lest we lose our humanity entirely. Become the fat old war mongers of the world. That summer semester at Devon School sounded like all my best summers. The lax supervision, the getting stuff done but having more fun sort of attitude. And sadly, that whole chunk of the book is there merely to contrast the sinister world these boys are standing on the edge of. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 by Greggmccormac | 1/22/2014

    " Read in college and re read it in book club. Great book! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 by Ed | 1/21/2014

    " Another high school read. I even read it again after college. "

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About the Author
Author John Knowles

John Knowles (1926–2001) was educated at Phillips Exeter Academy in New Hampshire and Yale. His first novel, A Separate Peace was published in 1959 and adapted for film in 1972. In 2004 it was adapted again as a television movie by Showtime. He wrote seven novels, a book on travel, and a collection of stories. He was the winner of the William Faulkner Award and the Rosenthal Award of the National Institute of Arts and Letters.