Extended Audio Sample

Download 47 Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample 47 (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Walter Mosley
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (632 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Walter Mosley Narrator: Ossie Davis Publisher: Listening Library Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: April 2005 ISBN:
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In his first book for young adults, best-selling author Walter Mosley deftly weaves historical and speculative fiction into a powerful narrative about the nature of freedom.

47 is a young slave boy living under the watchful eye of a brutal slave master. His life seems doomed until he meets a mysterious run-away slave, Tall John. Then 47 finds himself swept up in a struggle for his own liberation.

Deeply compelling, 47 is a rewarding narrative that will introduce a new generation of listeners to one of the most important writers in America.

Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jody | 2/9/2014

    " Walter Mosley had me right away, but later, when the book becomes "otherworldly", I lost some interest. I like historical fiction. Science fiction? Not as much. Still, a great book! I think this is my first Mosley, and yet, he sounds so familiar! It's about slavery. Oh! And on the back of the book it says, "Recommended for ages 10 to 17." I disagree. The book talks about slaves serving as "studs" and other real details that would have the parents of my fifth graders calling! I would say it's better suited for ages 13 and up. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kewpie | 2/5/2014

    " 47 is a plantation field slave, forbidden to have a name of his own -- he is simply assigned a number. He lives a life of downtrodden misery until the mysterious Tall John arrives at the plantation. He refuses to think of himself as a slave and claims that freedom comes from within. This is not a typical historic account of slavery. Tall John has a mysterious background and odd magical gadgets he carries in a carpet bag. This is a very unusual hybrid of history and science fiction. Read-alikes: No idea -- this book isn't even like other Walter Mosely books. It seems unique. It reminded me somewhat of a movie from the 80's called "The Brother from Another Planet" I'd recommend this book as a cross-over between science fiction and history. Perhaps someone who likes one but not the other could be persuaded to read this book. This is one of the most original and strange books I have ever read. It was also fun to read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Discovery College | 2/4/2014

    " This was an interesting (weird) mix of sci fi with historic fiction and I am not sure it did it very well. I am not sure of the resolution or for what it was supposed to accomplish. I enjoyed the narrative of life on a plantation as a black slave, but then the story went a bit strange. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Lisa | 2/1/2014

    " I would have given this book a higher rating if it wasnt for the science fiction parts. I could not wrap my head around a being from outer space freeing the slaves "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jill | 1/26/2014

    " It's clear that Mosley is a great writer, and has much to say. This short book was marketed for teens, but is equally readable by adults. On the surface it can be read as surrealist fantasy set in the days of slavery, an adventure story using the best of magical realism. But the themes that one finds when one digs deeper are the truth about what makes one a "slave" or "master" beyond the altogether real whips and chains and skin color. Can you be chained at night and still be free? I thought this question was an important one, but was also made somewhat less powerful by giving the narrator and his friend Tall John super powers. If you have extra abilities, of course you are going to be able to say you are free and overthrow your oppressors. The point would have been better made without this, but then, it would have been an entirely different novel, so ... you can decide. It was a quick read, and I easily recommend it for teens and adults. It might be harder for the middle school age. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Cara | 1/24/2014

    " I love this writer's mysteries for adults. This is trying hard to appeal to the "YA who wouldn't be caught dead reading historical fiction". An alien arrives to raise a slave boy's consciousness, but the escape is complicated by a zombie slave master out to take over the universe. Hm. It didn't work for me, but I think some of my students would be into it, and they would learn something about the horrors of plantation slavery. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jose | 1/19/2014

    " Awesome audio book. read by ossie davis. excellent. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Vy | 1/6/2014

    " For young adults, history meets science fiction, a what if story that challenges our understanding of what is possible, and the purpose for our time of birth. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Outsider Forever (Dylan Peters) | 11/19/2013

    " I liked this book a lot, but I felt it ended too quickly. (I won't spoil much). Most of the book was slow paced, and enjoyable. Then in the end, 47 and family are suddenly in Canada, setting up their new life. I would have enjoyed to read their adventures to get to the free land "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kate | 12/26/2012

    " they use the "n" word a lot in this book. So if you aren't allowed to read that kind of stuff, wait to read this. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mikhaela | 10/26/2012

    " There's a lot of good in this book, but like the other science fiction I've read by this author (Blue Light) the sci fi elements get really strange and don't really hold together. It feels like the first draft of a much better book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rachel Westhoff | 9/23/2012

    " This book was weird. I wasn't expecting the mix of slave/historical fiction and sci-fi. Very strange. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rhiannon | 5/19/2012

    " A bit confusing in the beginning, gets more understandable towards the end. Somewhat sad. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Min | 3/17/2012

    " I really enjoyed this book. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Suzette | 3/5/2012

    " a supernatural slave narrative. the idea was fabulous, the execution - not so much. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Beth Maliner | 2/26/2012

    " sci fi/fantasy/historical fiction - unusual, simple but effective treatment of early american slavery - aimed at middle school and young adult - well done emotional look at that horrid institution "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Leslie | 12/14/2011

    " It starts out as historical fiction and then halfway through it switches to sci-fi/fantasy stuff. I liked the first half. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ero | 9/20/2011

    " Deeply amazing. Starts as a horrific slave narrative, becomes science fiction (if that much-abused genre term can even apply to something so unique), is visionary all the way through. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Cathy | 6/11/2011

    " I am not quite sure how to describe this book. It's a little bit historical fiction, but also science fiction, too. Either way, it is a moving story. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jose | 4/10/2011

    " Awesome audio book. read by ossie davis. excellent. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Shanae | 1/28/2011

    " Simply magnificent. Brilliant writing. Exceptional storytelling. This is perfect. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Laya | 1/10/2011

    " I'm not into detective novels on the whole, so I havent read a lot of Walter Mosley's work. However, I've enjoyed his forays into fantasy and science fiction. This was a quick, pleasureable read. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Barbara | 12/8/2010

    " I found the plot shift between an apparent slave narrative and science fiction very disconcerting,especially coming as it did midway in the book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Philip | 12/8/2010

    " This is a YA novel by Walter Mosley and read by... Ossie Davis! Yes, please. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Miss Grady | 11/26/2010

    " I could not put this down! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Barry | 9/25/2010

    " Although intended for the younger reader, the mix of slavery and science fiction is unique, thoughful and provoking. A quick and good read which will leave you thinking afterwards. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Maz | 6/3/2010

    " I really enjoyed this book. "

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About the Author
Author Walter Mosley

Walter Mosley is the author of the acclaimed Easy Rawlins mystery series, including the national bestsellers Cinnamon Kiss, Little Scarlet, and Bad Boy Brawly Brown; the Fearless Jones series, including Fearless Jones, Fear Itself, and Fear of the Dark; the novels Blue Light and RL’s Dream; and two collections of stories featuring Socrates Fortlow, Always Outnumbered, Always Outgunned, for which he received the Anisfield-Wolf Award, and Walkin’ the Dog. He was born in Los Angeles and lives in New York.

About the Narrator

Ossie Davis (1917-2005) was an American actor, writer, and director best known for his many screen roles and for his involvement in the civil rights movement. Among his film and television credits are The Cardinal, Do the Right Thing, Doctor Doolittle, and The L Word. He was a featured speaker at the funerals of Martin Luther King and Malcolm X, and was inducted into the NAACP Image Awards Hall of Fame. In 1995, both he and his wife Ruby Dee received the National Medal of Arts—the highest honor given to an artist by the United States Government.