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Download You Can't Go Home Again Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample You Cant Go Home Again Audiobook, by Thomas Wolfe
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (2,148 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Thomas Wolfe Narrator: NBC Theater Publisher: Saland Publishing Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: August 2010 ISBN:
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George Webber, a first-time author, writes a book that makes frequent references to his home town of Libya Hill. The book is a success, except in Libya Hill, where the residents believe that it paints an extremely distorted portrait of their town. They send Webber menacing letters, including death threats.

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Listener Opinions

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 adam | 2/16/2014

    " huge drags in various places. some good characters (Judge Bland by far the best villain) "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 April | 2/8/2014

    " He died too soon. I miss the books he should have written. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Lali | 2/6/2014

    " I actually did not finish it, by the time I got to book five, the self-indulgent nature of the author's writing style just became too much for me. I did enjoy Book 1, 2 and 3. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Thom Kahler | 1/27/2014

    " After reading the biography of Max Perkins, the editor for some of the greatest literary lights of the early 20th Century, I went back and read or re-read the authors he edited. I thought I might discover something new in Hemingway or Fitzgerald, but the author I liked best was Thomas Wolfe. He's not the easiest to read, but his layers of complexity make him well worth the effort. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gail Katz | 1/21/2014

    " A FAVORITE SOUTHERN AUTHOR. eVEN BEEN TO HIS HOUSE IN THE MOST BEAUTIFUL nc MTSN I think I nght re read again. But this was a landmark book for me in my early college years. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kevin Morgan | 1/20/2014

    " Truly wonderful writing, like riding a wave on a surf board that goes on forever. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Miriam | 1/17/2014

    " I liked this fine. Knowing that most of it was cribbed from his actual life makes me feel...like he's cheating. I did love the section on the night of the big party with the weird puppet guy. And (spoiler alert) the ending of that section with the fire summarizes so perfectly the 1920s--the elevator operators die of smoke inhalation while running the apartment complex's guests out during the fire. The section on his drive through the English countryside with famous American author Lloyd McHarg (I have to go look that up and see if that was supposed to be someone real) was pretty funny. The section on Germany and Berlin during the 1936 Olympics really captures the sense of dread and oppression that we've all come to associate with Hitler's Germany. He also captures well the ambivalent feelings of many Germans toward Jews. He only lived until 1938, I wonder what he would have thought of everything after... It's a nice memoir set in third person, but is it a *story*? Not so much. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Alexa | 1/10/2014

    " see review for Look Homeward Angel "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Susan | 1/6/2014

    " A great American story, as pertinent now as it was when it was first published. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tom Steele | 12/19/2013

    " I don't know that I've ever read such pretty words. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Cissy | 11/11/2013

    " A genuis writer...very dense & wordy..but brilliant "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Meghann Slattery | 5/19/2013

    " Rereading for I don't know what time. There is something about this book I just really like. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lara | 3/28/2013

    " This was a great book. :) definitely a Good Read! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bob | 2/24/2013

    " This is another one of Thomas Wolfe's great books. It's wonderful! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Andrew | 8/20/2012

    " a long read, tough at times. Thomas Wolfe has a way with prose and philosophy thats hard to find anywhere else. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Stoic | 6/24/2012

    " The definition of "masterpiece." "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lori | 10/30/2011

    " i read Look Homeward Angel for a jr year highschool term paper. i love it thick. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jennifer Lynch | 10/5/2011

    " Something we all feel at some time in our lives.... "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Grant | 10/4/2011

    " the characters were one dimensional. i never felt engaged by the book. an obvious retelling of his own life, but the style or sense of plot development other writers posses who have done the same, i.e. hemingway, carver, plath. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Susy | 3/2/2011

    " Wolfe' writing is magnificent. His social commentaries are as relevant today as when they were written in the 1930's. He does wander away from the main story frequently, but the stories within the story are well worth the read. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 adam | 2/28/2011

    " huge drags in various places. some good characters (Judge Bland by far the best villain) "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Andrew | 2/27/2011

    " a long read, tough at times. Thomas Wolfe has a way with prose and philosophy thats hard to find anywhere else. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Marilyn | 1/19/2011

    " A classic and well-written book about an author who writes about his home town and burns some bridges in the process. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 April | 12/28/2010

    " He died too soon. I miss the books he should have written. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ted | 12/28/2010

    " I read this because I read that Kerouac read it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tom | 8/14/2010

    " I don't know that I've ever read such pretty words. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kelsey | 6/28/2010

    " Stopped in my tracks and caught my breath over and over. Beautiful language shot through with truth. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Maggie | 5/24/2010

    " This book had its good points, but I found the narrator's voice incredibly obnoxious. I guess I'd call it overwritten - very heavy on the adjectives, deep thoughts, etc. I like books where you have to work a little harder to understand the characters and conclusions. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Geno | 5/17/2010

    " 3.5........This book to me was all over the place but most episodes very engaging.. "

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About the Author
Author Thomas Wolfe

Thomas Clayton Wolfe (1900–1938) was an American novelist of the early twentieth century. Wolfe wrote four lengthy novels, plus many short stories, dramatic works and novellas. He is known for mixing highly original, poetic, rhapsodic, and impressionistic prose with autobiographical writing. Wolfe’s influence extends to the writings of beat generation writer Jack Kerouac, and of authors Ray Bradbury and Philip Roth, among others. He remains an important writer in modern American literature, as one of the first masters of autobiographical fiction, and is considered North Carolina’s most famous writer.