X MINUS ONE: SEASON TWO Audiobook, by Robert A. Heinlein Play Audiobook Sample
X MINUS ONE: SEASON TWO Audiobook, by Robert A. Heinlein Play Audiobook Sample
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Read By: Ruby Dee, Sam Gray, Raymond Edward Johnson, Norman Rose, Larry Robinson, Donald Buka, Peter Fernandez, Alan Hewitt, Bob Hastings, Hetty Galen, Jack Grimes, Jim Boles, Joe De Santis, Joyce Gordon, Luis Van Rooten, Mandel Kramer, Nat Polen, Peter Capell, Roger DeKoven, Santos Ortega, a full cast, William Keene, Ted Osborne Publisher: House Of Joy Publishing Listen Time: at 1.0x Speed 12.83 hours at 1.5x Speed 9.63 hours at 2.0x Speed Release Date: October 2019 Format: Audio Theater Audiobook ISBN: 9781982783150

Quick Stats About this Audiobook

Total Audiobook Chapters:

44

Longest Chapter Length:

29:01 minutes

Shortest Chapter Length:

11 seconds

Average Chapter Length:

26:14 minutes

Audiobooks by this Author:

45

Other Audiobooks Written by Robert A. Heinlein: > View All...

Publisher Description

The best Science Fiction stories to come from such authors as Ray Bradbury, Isaac Asimov, and Poul Anderson. Originally a spinoff from the NBC radio show DIMENSION X, X MINUS ONE continued the tradition of outstanding writing, acting, and direction for three seasons from 1955 to 1958 on NBC radio. X MINUS ONE, VOLUME ONE contains all 42 half-hour episodes from the original radio broadcasts of the 1956 season, digitally remastered and commercial free.

Download and start listening now!

X MINUS ONE: SEASON TWO Listener Reviews

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About the Authors

Robert Anson Heinlein (1907–1988) was born in Missouri. He served five years in the US Navy and then attended graduate classes in mathematics and physics at UCLA. After a variety of jobs, he began to write science fiction in 1939. He is a four-time winner of the Hugo Award and a recipient of three Retro Hugos, and in 1975 he was named the first recipient of the Grand Master Award for lifetime achievement. Several of his books were New York Times bestsellers, and his worldwide bestsellers have been translated into twenty-two languages. 

Fritz Leiber (1910–1992) was equally adept at writing science fiction, fantasy, and horror. His works were honored with the Hugo, Nebula and World Fantasy awards, and he was named a Grand Master by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. He also received the Gandalf Grand Master Award for fantasy writing.

Theodore Sturgeon (1918–1985) is one of the great figures of the golden age of science fiction. He wrote over two hundred stories, several novels, scripts for film and television (including two of the most famous episodes of the original Star Trek), plays, and dozens of nonfiction reviews and essays. His many literary awards include the Hugo, the Nebula, and the International Fantasy Award. His most famous novel, More Than Human, won serious academic recognition as literature, a rarity amongst science fiction works of the 1950s.

Ray Bradbury (1920–2012), one of the most popular science fiction writers in the world, wrote more than five hundred short stories, novels, plays, and poems. He won many awards, including the Grand Master Award from the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America, the O. Henry Memorial Award, the Benjamin Franklin Award, the World Fantasy Award for Lifetime Achievement, and the PEN Center USA West Lifetime Achievement Award. In 2000, he was the recipient of the National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters.

Poul Anderson (1926–2001) was one of the most prolific and popular writers in science fiction. He won the Hugo Award seven times and the Nebula Award three times, as well as many other awards, including the Grand Master Award of the Science Fiction Writers of America for a lifetime of distinguished achievement. With a degree in physics and a wide knowledge of other fields of science, he was noted for building stories on a solid foundation of real science, as well as for being one of the most skilled creators of fast-paced adventure stories. He was author of over one hundred novels and story collections, several hundred short stories, and several mysteries and nonfiction books.

Isaac Asimov (1920–1992) was born in the Soviet Union and came to the United States in 1923. He earned his PhD in chemistry in 1948, and in 1958 became a full-time writer. His writings include the Foundation Trilogy; I, Robot; Tomorrow’s Children; and numerous works of nonfiction touching on a range of scientific topics. Among his accolades are six Hugo awards, a SFWA Grand Master Award, and high praise from such luminaries as Kurt Vonnegut, Arthur C. Clarke, and Gene Roddenberry.

Harlan Ellison (1934–2018) wrote and edited more than 120 books and more than 1,700 stories, essays, and articles, as well as dozens of screenplays and teleplays. He won the Hugo award nine times, the Nebula award three times, the Bram Stoker award six times (including the Lifetime Achievement Award in 1996), the Edgar Allan Poe Award of the Mystery Writers of America twice, the Georges Méliès Fantasy Film Award twice, and was awarded the Silver Pen for Journalism by PEN, the international writer’s union. He was named a Grand Master by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America in 2006.

Frederik Pohl (1919–2013) won the National Book Award in 1980 for his novel Jem. From about 1959 until 1969, he edited Galaxy magazine and its sister magazine, If, winning the Hugo Award for it three years in a row. His writing also won him four Hugos and multiple Nebula Awards. He became a Nebula Grand Master in 1993. In 2010 he won the Hugo Award for Best Fan Writer, based on the writing on his blog, “The Way the Future Blogs.”

Robert Silverberg’s first published story appeared in 1954 when he was a sophomore at Columbia University. Since then, he has won the prestigious Nebula Award five times and the Hugo Award five times. He has been nominated for both awards more times than any other writer. In 1999 he was inducted into the Science Fiction Hall of Fame, and in 2004 the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America gave him their Grand Master Award for career achievement. He remains one of the most imaginative and versatile writers in science fiction.

Ernest Kinoy (1925–2014) was an American writer, screenwriter, and playwright. He was a five-time nominee for the Primetime Emmy Award, winning twice, and winner of two Writers Guild of America Awards.

Ernest Kinoy (1925–2014) was an American writer, screenwriter, and playwright. He was a five-time nominee for the Primetime Emmy Award, winning twice, and winner of two Writers Guild of America Awards.

George Lefferts is a writer, producer, playwright, poet, and director of television dramas, motion pictures, radio dramas, and socially conscious documentaries, whose original plays and films for television have won the Emmy Award six times and the Golden Globe twice.

Robert Silverberg’s first published story appeared in 1954 when he was a sophomore at Columbia University. Since then, he has won the prestigious Nebula Award five times and the Hugo Award five times. He has been nominated for both awards more times than any other writer. In 1999 he was inducted into the Science Fiction Hall of Fame, and in 2004 the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America gave him their Grand Master Award for career achievement. He remains one of the most imaginative and versatile writers in science fiction.

Robert Anson Heinlein (1907–1988) was born in Missouri. He served five years in the US Navy and then attended graduate classes in mathematics and physics at UCLA. After a variety of jobs, he began to write science fiction in 1939. He is a four-time winner of the Hugo Award and a recipient of three Retro Hugos, and in 1975 he was named the first recipient of the Grand Master Award for lifetime achievement. Several of his books were New York Times bestsellers, and his worldwide bestsellers have been translated into twenty-two languages. 

L. Sprague de Camp (1907–2000) was a major figure in science fiction and fantasy with novels that included the acclaimed Lest Darkness Fall. A member of the Swordsmen and Sorcerers Guild of America, he championed the Conan adventures beginning with the Gnome Press hardcovers in the 1950s.

Norman Rose (1917–2004) was an American actor, film narrator, and radio announcer known for his velvety baritone voice. He was an accomplished stage actor appearing on Broadway. During World War II, he was recruited by the United States Office of War Information to work as a radio newscaster. After the war, he lent his distinctive voice to radio programs such as Dimension X and CBS Radio Mystery Theater. Nicknamed “The Voice of God” by colleagues because of his deep, recognizable voice, he had numerous film roles, including the voice of “Death” in Woody Allen’s comedy Love and Death. His other film work includes Woody Allen’s Radio Days and the opening narration for Message from Space, narrating the English dub of the 1968 Soviet Union production of War and Peace, and as a newsreel announcer in Biloxi Blues. He stepped in front of the camera to portray psychiatrist Dr. Marcus Polk in television’s One Life to Live and All My Children. He also appeared in The Edge of Night and Search for Tomorrow.

Frederik Pohl (1919–2013) won the National Book Award in 1980 for his novel Jem. From about 1959 until 1969, he edited Galaxy magazine and its sister magazine, If, winning the Hugo Award for it three years in a row. His writing also won him four Hugos and multiple Nebula Awards. He became a Nebula Grand Master in 1993. In 2010 he won the Hugo Award for Best Fan Writer, based on the writing on his blog, “The Way the Future Blogs.”

Poul Anderson (1926–2001) was one of the most prolific and popular writers in science fiction. He won the Hugo Award seven times and the Nebula Award three times, as well as many other awards, including the Grand Master Award of the Science Fiction Writers of America for a lifetime of distinguished achievement. With a degree in physics and a wide knowledge of other fields of science, he was noted for building stories on a solid foundation of real science, as well as for being one of the most skilled creators of fast-paced adventure stories. He was author of over one hundred novels and story collections, several hundred short stories, and several mysteries and nonfiction books.

George Lefferts is a writer, producer, playwright, poet, and director of television dramas, motion pictures, radio dramas, and socially conscious documentaries, whose original plays and films for television have won the Emmy Award six times and the Golden Globe twice.

Hans Christian Andersen (1805–1875) was born in Odense, Denmark, the son of a poor shoemaker and a washerwoman. As a young teenager, he became quite well known in Odense as a reciter of drama and as a singer. When he was fourteen, he set off for the capital, Copenhagen, determined to become a national success on the stage. He failed miserably, but made some influential friends in the capital who got him into school to remedy his lack of proper education. In 1829 his first book was published. After that, books came out at regular intervals. His stories began to be translated into English as early as 1846. Since then, numerous editions, and more recently Hollywood songs and Disney cartoons, have helped to ensure the continuing popularity of the stories in the English-speaking world.

About the Narrators

Ruby Dee (1922–2014) was a multi-award-winning actress, playwright, screenwriter, and activist. During her seven-decade career, she won a Grammy, Emmy, Obie, and Drama Desk award and was nominated for an Academy Award. She was also the recipient of a National Medal of Arts, a Kennedy Center Honor, and Screen Actors Guild Life Achievement Award. She is perhaps best known for originating the role of Ruth Younger in the stage and film versions of A Raisin in the Sun, but she also had roles in Spike Lee’s Do the Right Thing and Jungle Fever. She was also known for her civic work with husband Ossie Davis. She also wrote plays, fiction, and a column in New York’s Amsterdam News. Born in Cleveland, she worked initially with the American Negro Theater in Harlem, where she grew up.

Norman Rose (1917–2004) was an American actor, film narrator, and radio announcer known for his velvety baritone voice. He was an accomplished stage actor appearing on Broadway. During World War II, he was recruited by the United States Office of War Information to work as a radio newscaster. After the war, he lent his distinctive voice to radio programs such as Dimension X and CBS Radio Mystery Theater. Nicknamed “The Voice of God” by colleagues because of his deep, recognizable voice, he had numerous film roles, including the voice of “Death” in Woody Allen’s comedy Love and Death. His other film work includes Woody Allen’s Radio Days and the opening narration for Message from Space, narrating the English dub of the 1968 Soviet Union production of War and Peace, and as a newsreel announcer in Biloxi Blues. He stepped in front of the camera to portray psychiatrist Dr. Marcus Polk in television’s One Life to Live and All My Children. He also appeared in The Edge of Night and Search for Tomorrow.

Norman Rose (1917–2004) was an American actor, film narrator, and radio announcer known for his velvety baritone voice. He was an accomplished stage actor appearing on Broadway. During World War II, he was recruited by the United States Office of War Information to work as a radio newscaster. After the war, he lent his distinctive voice to radio programs such as Dimension X and CBS Radio Mystery Theater. Nicknamed “The Voice of God” by colleagues because of his deep, recognizable voice, he had numerous film roles, including the voice of “Death” in Woody Allen’s comedy Love and Death. His other film work includes Woody Allen’s Radio Days and the opening narration for Message from Space, narrating the English dub of the 1968 Soviet Union production of War and Peace, and as a newsreel announcer in Biloxi Blues. He stepped in front of the camera to portray psychiatrist Dr. Marcus Polk in television’s One Life to Live and All My Children. He also appeared in The Edge of Night and Search for Tomorrow.

George Lefferts is a writer, producer, playwright, poet, and director of television dramas, motion pictures, radio dramas, and socially conscious documentaries, whose original plays and films for television have won the Emmy Award six times and the Golden Globe twice.

Alexander Scourby (1913–1985) was a stage and screen actor. He distinguished himself as narrator of many television specials, most notably The Body Human, and recorded more than five hundred books for the blind for the Library of Congress, including the Bible.

Isaac Asimov (1920–1992) was born in the Soviet Union and came to the United States in 1923. He earned his PhD in chemistry in 1948, and in 1958 became a full-time writer. His writings include the Foundation Trilogy; I, Robot; Tomorrow’s Children; and numerous works of nonfiction touching on a range of scientific topics. Among his accolades are six Hugo awards, a SFWA Grand Master Award, and high praise from such luminaries as Kurt Vonnegut, Arthur C. Clarke, and Gene Roddenberry.

Robert Silverberg’s first published story appeared in 1954 when he was a sophomore at Columbia University. Since then, he has won the prestigious Nebula Award five times and the Hugo Award five times. He has been nominated for both awards more times than any other writer. In 1999 he was inducted into the Science Fiction Hall of Fame, and in 2004 the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America gave him their Grand Master Award for career achievement. He remains one of the most imaginative and versatile writers in science fiction.

Robert Anson Heinlein (1907–1988) was born in Missouri. He served five years in the US Navy and then attended graduate classes in mathematics and physics at UCLA. After a variety of jobs, he began to write science fiction in 1939. He is a four-time winner of the Hugo Award and a recipient of three Retro Hugos, and in 1975 he was named the first recipient of the Grand Master Award for lifetime achievement. Several of his books were New York Times bestsellers, and his worldwide bestsellers have been translated into twenty-two languages. 

Norman Rose (1917–2004) was an American actor, film narrator, and radio announcer known for his velvety baritone voice. He was an accomplished stage actor appearing on Broadway. During World War II, he was recruited by the United States Office of War Information to work as a radio newscaster. After the war, he lent his distinctive voice to radio programs such as Dimension X and CBS Radio Mystery Theater. Nicknamed “The Voice of God” by colleagues because of his deep, recognizable voice, he had numerous film roles, including the voice of “Death” in Woody Allen’s comedy Love and Death. His other film work includes Woody Allen’s Radio Days and the opening narration for Message from Space, narrating the English dub of the 1968 Soviet Union production of War and Peace, and as a newsreel announcer in Biloxi Blues. He stepped in front of the camera to portray psychiatrist Dr. Marcus Polk in television’s One Life to Live and All My Children. He also appeared in The Edge of Night and Search for Tomorrow.

Ray Bradbury (1920–2012), one of the most popular science fiction writers in the world, wrote more than five hundred short stories, novels, plays, and poems. He won many awards, including the Grand Master Award from the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America, the O. Henry Memorial Award, the Benjamin Franklin Award, the World Fantasy Award for Lifetime Achievement, and the PEN Center USA West Lifetime Achievement Award. In 2000, he was the recipient of the National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters.

Robert Silverberg’s first published story appeared in 1954 when he was a sophomore at Columbia University. Since then, he has won the prestigious Nebula Award five times and the Hugo Award five times. He has been nominated for both awards more times than any other writer. In 1999 he was inducted into the Science Fiction Hall of Fame, and in 2004 the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America gave him their Grand Master Award for career achievement. He remains one of the most imaginative and versatile writers in science fiction.

George Lefferts is a writer, producer, playwright, poet, and director of television dramas, motion pictures, radio dramas, and socially conscious documentaries, whose original plays and films for television have won the Emmy Award six times and the Golden Globe twice.

Norman Rose (1917–2004) was an American actor, film narrator, and radio announcer known for his velvety baritone voice. He was an accomplished stage actor appearing on Broadway. During World War II, he was recruited by the United States Office of War Information to work as a radio newscaster. After the war, he lent his distinctive voice to radio programs such as Dimension X and CBS Radio Mystery Theater. Nicknamed “The Voice of God” by colleagues because of his deep, recognizable voice, he had numerous film roles, including the voice of “Death” in Woody Allen’s comedy Love and Death. His other film work includes Woody Allen’s Radio Days and the opening narration for Message from Space, narrating the English dub of the 1968 Soviet Union production of War and Peace, and as a newsreel announcer in Biloxi Blues. He stepped in front of the camera to portray psychiatrist Dr. Marcus Polk in television’s One Life to Live and All My Children. He also appeared in The Edge of Night and Search for Tomorrow.

Robert Silverberg’s first published story appeared in 1954 when he was a sophomore at Columbia University. Since then, he has won the prestigious Nebula Award five times and the Hugo Award five times. He has been nominated for both awards more times than any other writer. In 1999 he was inducted into the Science Fiction Hall of Fame, and in 2004 the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America gave him their Grand Master Award for career achievement. He remains one of the most imaginative and versatile writers in science fiction.

Ernest Kinoy (1925–2014) was an American writer, screenwriter, and playwright. He was a five-time nominee for the Primetime Emmy Award, winning twice, and winner of two Writers Guild of America Awards.

Gabra Zackman is an actress, author, and narrator who has won several AudioFile Earphones Awards. She was educated at Northwestern University. A classically trained actress, she has appeared in theaters all over the country as well as on film and television.

Ernest Kinoy (1925–2014) was an American writer, screenwriter, and playwright. He was a five-time nominee for the Primetime Emmy Award, winning twice, and winner of two Writers Guild of America Awards.