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Download Women in Love Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Women in Love Audiobook, by D. H. Lawrence
3.09 out of 53.09 out of 53.09 out of 53.09 out of 53.09 out of 5 3.09 (34 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: D. H. Lawrence Narrator: Bob Peck Publisher: CSA Word Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: February 2008 ISBN:
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Women in Love begins one blossoming spring day in England and ends with a terrible catastrophe in the snow of the Alps. Ursula and Gudrun are very different sisters who become entangled with two friends, Rupert and Gerald, who live in their hometown.

The bonds between the couples quickly become intense and passionate, but whether this passion is creative or destructive is unclear. In this astonishing novel, widely considered to be D. H. Lawrence's best work, he explores what it means to be human in an age of conflict and confusion. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Chad Perrin | 2/14/2014

    " The edition I read had some critical commentary in the frontmatter. In one case, someone or other was quoted as having said this book should have been called "Everyone In Hate". That's only the beginning of the story: everyone is completely, irrationally hateful, spiteful, and petty at times, especially the women -- including the painfully incomprehensible act of attempted murder with a paperweight over a shockingly mild disagreement about the meaning of a probably meaningless painting of a duck, compounded by the victim's later conclusion that he deserved the unprovoked attack, which in a better writer's work might have been attributed to the severe concussion he received. Meanwhile, the attention on the manly physiques of the heroic male characters was absurd in its poorly suppressed and utterly gratuitous lasciviousness, while the fatuous, excrutiating attention to irrelevant details (such as the comically out of place page and a half devoted to the yellow dress worn by one of the key female characters in the midst of what could have been a tragic incident involving a boy's untimely demise) boggled the mind. One could easily be forgiven for coming away from this book with the idea that its author was a misogynistic, cowardly, loathesomely passive-aggressive man who lashed out at everyone who did not regard him with stars in their eyes through the pathetic mechanism of turning them into comically vile people in his writing, his view of the world twisted by his inability to reconcile his latent (but obviously emerging) homesexuality with his cultural indoctrination. In fact, if one was to then go on to read about Lawrence's life at the time he wrote the book, one's ideas to that effect would be fully justified. The asinine double-helping of teenage angst behind Lawrence's piss-poor writing might be forgivable if he was not about twice the age normal for that kind of self-pitying pathos. I'm convinced the only reason this overwrought, overvalued, overlong bundle of kindling is regarded as a "classic" is its controversy at the time it was published and the fact it is a relatively early indicator of the way repressed sexual deviations from the norms of the time found outlet in what we might call "the arts" for lack of a better, less flattering term for this novel. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lisa James | 2/4/2014

    " Ok, definitely NOT in the caliber of Lady Chatterley's Lover, I thought the characters, sisters Gudrun & Ursula, annoying as heck. They were seriously wishy washy, not really knowing WHAT they wanted, & the story just didn't "flow" for me. Hoping Sons & Lovers will be better! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Charlotte | 2/1/2014

    " one of my all-time faves. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kristen | 1/8/2014

    " One of a very few books I struggled to get through. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 jacky | 1/6/2014

    " I had to read this for my 20th century lit class. I just couldn't get into the story or the characters at all. I never finished it because I could get away with never finishing it. I don't think I even made it half way through. It is possible that I would have liked it I had read more of or if I had more support from my professor or if I wasn't reading so many other books at the time. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lydia | 1/1/2014

    " Love D.H. Lawerence. Sometimes it seems I am the only person that does. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bethany | 12/30/2013

    " I love this book and keep coming back to DH Lawrence again and again. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Deb | 12/20/2013

    " Not memorable for me. But I know I really liked everything I ever read by DH Lawrence. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Christin | 12/14/2013

    " The only thing I hate more than Return of the Native and Sons and Lovers is this book. Chthonic in the most horrifying sense. Traumatic and awful. As many have quipped, "It should be called Men in Love." Read Kate Millet's book on Lawrence instead. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Susan | 9/29/2013

    " After about 150 pages, I can't bring myself to finish this, which will probably have me thrown out of all literary circles I might have a chance to come close to. The women and the relationships are just ridiculous. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Talkingtowalls | 9/29/2013

    " Just ordered this book from an online bookseller, exteremly excited, have been saving it for this winter. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Georgia Butler | 9/7/2013

    " As I young woman I recall loving this book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kimberly Laura Malone | 8/28/2013

    " I find it riveting in a really refreshing way. Why did we not have to read this in high school? "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Angela | 8/10/2013

    " ...I will never think of `love` in the same way ever again...a tad bit too much existentialism for my taste... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bob Ryan | 7/14/2013

    " i've been reading this book for about 8 years. does it still count? "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Kingfan30 | 2/19/2013

    " Have to say I did not get on very well with this book and could not relate to the characters at all. I did manage to get to then end but can not say that I enjoyed it. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Geoffrey Underwood | 12/27/2012

    " I had to put it down. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Xio | 11/13/2012

    " Ken Russell is a fun guy. Oliver Reed, Glenda Jackson, the others are troopers hanging in for these films of his. Fucking hilarious and pleasing. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Narendra Simone | 10/16/2012

    " One of his greatest books. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kevin | 7/6/2012

    " WOMEN IN LOVE made a man out of me. I mean that in a metaphorical, literary sense. Like saying that some harsh cup of coffee might "put hair on your chest." That's what I mean. WOMEN IN LOVE is a hella big mug of ultra-harsh sensual coffee. Dip me in again, D.H. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Elizabeth | 1/25/2012

    " Also the movie was great "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Suzanne | 12/26/2011

    " The book is a slog to get through, the film version with Alan Bates is much better. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Liesel | 12/15/2011

    " Not a book for the faint of heart. You'll doze off in the 6,000 pages of endless nothingness. But, it describes the human spirit in the most grotesque and real way it possibly could. D.H. Lawrence is a fucked up hero. Let us applaud him. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Erika S | 10/16/2011

    " Terrible book, do not read. It's very long and very boring. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 John Mark | 6/18/2011

    " A wonderful novel of a boy who loves his mother a little too much. At first, when Lawrence is laying down the background, the story is a bit shaky and seems to move rather quickly. But once he settles down and slows a bit, the novel really shines. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Julee Meltzer | 6/18/2011

    " Well, it was a little depressing, but a great book. I just finished it last week and I am still a little bummed. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Anna | 5/31/2011

    " Not a huge fan. It's basically the story of an egoist character partially based upon on the young life of the egoist author. He had to of used the term "he hated her" about 100+ times. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tony | 5/18/2011

    " See the flowers. Smell the flowers. Take them! Mother! Mother! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kirsten | 5/11/2011

    " I can see why it was controversial at the time but overall I wasn't impressed. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kaworu | 5/2/2011

    " Fairly interesting, although I admit a tad dry at times. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ashley | 4/11/2011

    " This book is fantastic. It takes Lawrence awhile to say what he wants to say but I found it to be worth the wait. Clara was a bore but I adored Miriam. Lawrence's obsession on love and hate existing as one is quite interesting. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Laura | 4/8/2011

    " BRILLIANT. Captures relationships between men and women and mothers and sons so well. Influence of the countryside and nature on the characters is beautiful. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Caroline | 4/4/2011

    " This was a set book when I was at school. It was OK but I don't want to read it again. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Amber | 3/30/2011

    " This book was okay. The characters weren't memorable. The only bit of interesting language was the way he captured the dialect. Generally boring. "

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About the Author

David Herbert Lawrence (1885–1930), novelist, short-story writer, poet, critic, playwright, and essayist, was one of the most important and controversial figures of twentieth-century English literature. His works confront the dehumanizing effects of modernity and industrialization and are notable for their passionate intensity and for a sensuality that centers on the erotic. Though his opinions earned him enemies, persecution, and censorship during his lifetime, he is now recognized as an artistic visionary.

About the Narrator

Bob Peck (1945-1999) was an award-winning British actor with the National Theater and Royal Shakespeare Company, performing in Nicolas Nickleby, Macbeth, and Othello, among other productions. On television, he appeared in many successful series including Z-Cars, Play for Today, and Edge of Darkness, for which he won a British Academy Television Award for best actor and is perhaps best-known. After gaining popularity as a television actor, Peck went on to appear in numerous films and was cast in his biggest film as park gamekeeper Robert Muldoon in Jurassic Park. He died of cancer at his home in London in 1999, survived by his wife and three children.