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Extended Audio Sample Winesburg, Ohio Audiobook, by Sherwood Anderson Click for printable size audiobook cover
3.76 out of 53.76 out of 53.76 out of 53.76 out of 53.76 out of 5 3.76 (151 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Sherwood Anderson Narrator: Rob Rubin, Susan McCarthy, Linda Montgomery, Al Bedrosian, Lou Spiegel, Bobbie Frohman, Larry Smith, Bruce Blau, David Thorn, Jim Johanson, Kevin Kennedy, Melissa Leventon, Estelle Piper Kennedy Publisher: Alcazar AudioWorks Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: January 2006 ISBN: 9781455181186
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This timeless collection charted a new stylistic path for modern fiction. Through twenty-two connected short stories, Sherwood Anderson looks into the lives of the inhabitants of a small town in the American heartland. These psychological portraits of the sensitive and imaginative of Winesburg’s population are seen through the eyes of a young reporter-narrator, George Willard. Their stories are about loneliness and alienation, passion and virginity, wealth and poverty, thrift and profligacy, carelessness and abandon. With its simple and intense style, Winesburg, Ohio evokes the quiet moments of epiphany in the lives of ordinary men and women.

Though its reputation once suffered, Winesburg, Ohio is now considered one of the most influential portraits of pre-industrial small-town life in the United States. In 1998, the Modern Library ranked it twenty-fourth on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the twentieth century, and it continues to be read widely both in and out of classrooms around the country.

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Quotes & Awards

  • “As a rule, first books show more bravado than anything else, unless it be tediousness. But there is neither of these qualities in Winesburg, Ohio…These people live and breathe: they are beautiful.”

    E. M. Forster

  • “Nothing quite like it has ever been done in America. It is so vivid, so full of insight, so shiningly lifelike and glowing, that the book is lifted into a category all its own.”

    H. L. Mencken

  • “Considered to be one of the forerunners of modern fiction…[A] ground-breaking masterpiece.”

    Midwest Book Review

  • Winesburg, Ohio, when it first appeared, kept me up a whole night in a steady crescendo of emotion.”

    Hart Crane, American poet

  • “A timeless book of connected short stories about the brave, cowardly, and altogether realistic inhabitants of an imaginary American town.”

    AudioFile

  • “A work of love, an attempt to break down the walls that divide one person from another, and also, in its own fashion, a celebration of small-town life in the lost days of goodwill and innocence.”

    Malcolm Cowley

  • “The lost, alienated, but basically decent ‘grotesques’ of Winesburg, Ohio seem more endearing year by year as the modern world present to us an endless parade of human monsters who contain bottomless oceans of conviction and seas of desire, but no ambivalence, no humility, and no self-doubt.”

    Dean Koontz

  • “When he calls himself a ‘poor scribbler’ don’t believe him. He is not a poor scribbler…he is a very great writer.”

    Ernest Hemingway

  • Number 24 on the Modern Library‘s 100 Best English-Language Novels of the Twentieth Century

Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Gina | 2/18/2014

    " Of course it's a beautiful book, but I had a hard time finishing it. Maybe the prose itself (prepositional phrases, oddly shaped sentences) made it hard for me to follow. Each chapter is lovely however, and worth rereading, but perhaps a little too quiet and sad for me. (When it comes to grand pronouncements about youth and love, I'd rather read A Room with a View.) "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Matthew | 2/17/2014

    " Anderson puts on a clinic of clean, beautiful writing and plot structure. A lot to learn from this book, long as it took me to read it. Thing of beauty. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Amira | 2/15/2014

    " What I most like in the book is its pessimistic touch. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Megan Fritts | 2/12/2014

    " Completely brilliant. I don't know why this book isn't more widely-read... but it should be. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Marisa | 2/10/2014

    " I didn't finish it, and probably won't, though I read about 3/4 of it. Life is too short (and my book list too long) for utterly boring books. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Carly | 2/8/2014

    " Winesburg, Ohio is by far my favorite book that I've read in college. It's one of those stories that you can keep coming back to for years to come and still get something new out of it. I absolutely love the vignette style of writing, and its a great book to carry with you in your purse for sudden inspiration. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Davy | 2/8/2014

    " This book is damn tandy. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jennifer | 2/8/2014

    " A good classic. Pretty easy to follow. It is a collection of short storys put into a novel about the people in a small town by the name of Winesburg, Ohio. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jscorse | 2/7/2014

    " Another solid book that really shouldn't be considered a classic. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sher | 2/6/2014

    " the single most influential book for me, winesburg ohio remains a classic that people either love or loathe. the uncomplicated writing, the short stories tied together by a young protagonist, and anderson's commentary on male-female relationships make this book on small-town, turn of the (last) century midwestern life breathe. a classic. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Artifice Magazine | 2/5/2014

    " I wish you could see my cover. It's so good. I got it at a garage sale - actually a yard-sale-turned-carpet-sale on the sidewalk, in Oberlin, Ohio. So that was nice. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Michelle Hankes | 2/5/2014

    " The first time I read this book, it was in high school for an AP English class. I remember loving it then and how each of the character's had their own storylines. But upon the second reading, some years later, I didn't finish it and I didn't really care for it. I think books sometimes speak to us in the time that we need them or identify with them. Apparently, things have changed. The second time around, I found it dark, sullen, drab and dreary. Not to mention, depressing. I was also quite disappointed. So, I guess the saying is true - you can't go back. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Hoezodanbooks | 2/4/2014

    " Just, amazing prose: elegant but never a redundant word. A century old. Timeless at the same time. Wow. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Andrew | 2/2/2014

    " Really good read and a great way to start 2013. It could be a little redundant here and there but there were some amazing moments particularly in the last three stories and Tandy. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jennifer Spiegel | 2/2/2014

    " On my ideal bookshelf for too many reasons to go into right now. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 eric mallory morgan | 1/30/2014

    " the sixteen year-old version of me would have given this one star "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Shannon | 1/29/2014

    " You know, this book was good, but I never got sucked in and started hating it by the end of the 2nd month of reading it. Not because it wasn't good, but because I wasn't done with it and wanted to read something engaging. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sharon Wright | 1/27/2014

    " I enjoyed this book while constantly wanting more. I think it was the author's intent. Every character wanted more, and life is what it is, you do the best you can and have to accept the outcome. Even when that means wanting more!! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Maggie | 1/24/2014

    " I thought that this book was interesting, once you got the idea of it. I'm not going to lie, it was very confusing for me at first and I had to think "wait, how does this connect?". I also had to drag myself through the first 5 short stories, but after a while, it became clearer. That's another thing, this is a collection of short stories(or i guess you can call them chapters) but each part had to basically deal with a different character. There is one main character so if you decided to choose this book, it will be difficult to get more. I mean, this is a good novel, but just be warned that this is just a bit difficult as well. So that is why I gave it 3 stars. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Shar | 1/23/2014

    " Interesting characters, well written, but very strange. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Jbsfaculty | 1/22/2014

    " I didn't care for this book; it profiles a variety of people living in this town, but I don't think I got to know them very well. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Grafton | 1/21/2014

    " This is my favorite book. This perfectly illustrates the humanity discussed in latter existential thought such as Buber and Tillich. I no longer felt alone or misunderstood after reading it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gabriel | 1/20/2014

    " Sherwood Andersen had a number of high-profile disciples, such as Faulkner and Thomas Wolfe the elder. His short stories are remarkable. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Carly Charles | 1/18/2014

    " A really excellent collection of short stories. Of course, juxtaposed with the shit early British Literature I have to read for English 209, everything else is absolutely golden. Still, though, I recommend this book--a great read for lonely people. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Anne | 1/16/2014

    " I am sure this was groundbreaking in its time, but to me today, Winesburg seems overwrought and psychologically one-dimensional. Yes, this style of writing was innovative at the time. And yes, writing of the inner, tortured lives of his characters reveals that there is certainly a dark-side in virtually every human being. My quarrel is that this is all we see of these citizens--their "grotesqueness". I had hoped that at least some of these people would reconcile the darker aspects of their inner core and move past the early thwarted loves and missed opportunities. I was looking for some hopeful signs to balance the relentless despair, some true connections to balance the loneliness. There were glimmers of hope towards the end, but in general, this is a desperately despondent portrait of human beings. And although I could "appreciate" it more after discussion with my book group, I still did not like it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Hashi | 1/16/2014

    " This is deservedly a classic. Rich, complex character studies; a joy to read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Scroutch | 1/6/2014

    " Winesburg, Ohio was, pleasantly, not what I had expected. The book is a collection of twenty-some vignettes concerning the residents of a small Midwest town at the beginning of the twentieth century. Anderson has a distinctly American(a) style, anachronistically reminiscent of Hemingway. The short stories are all connected through the common theme of the town and through common characters, creating something like a novel, much as in Faulkner's Go Down, Moses. Some of the stories are really outstanding, some even frightening, while others may seem a bit direct at times, or formulaic. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jacquelyn | 1/4/2014

    " One of the best books I've ever read. Run, do not walk, to this book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jo-Anne Teal | 12/31/2013

    " Extremely well written and analysis of the stories holds up over the years but oh my oh my, it was one of the most depressing books...well THE most depressing book I've read. I can't imagine recommending it. Studying it yes, reading it for pleasure - ah, no. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mona | 12/31/2013

    " liked the short story arrangement centered around characters in winesburg; however, one female reader was so annoying! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mistinguette Smith | 12/30/2013

    " Makes me wish I was a better writer. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Trevor | 12/30/2013

    " what's up wing biddlebaum, little pieces of paper balled up in yoru pockets like so many junior mints. ahh i've read this one three times: h.s., and twice for college i think. it's a good megamix of stories about some small town in ohio round the turn of the last century. plus there's a mention of a little amusement park called cedar point. BIG UPS! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Bobby | 12/29/2013

    " I got about 50 pages into this and couldn't finish it. It was just boring. i wanted to like it, Anderson being an antecedent to some of my favorite authors. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Brian | 12/26/2013

    " What a depressingly depressing book. Frankly, I wouldn't want to spend a day with anyone who'd actively read this in their spare time. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dan | 12/25/2013

    " Most depressing book ever written... will make you hate yourself, hahaha. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Niki | 12/25/2013

    " I dig Sherwood Anderson. I grew up in Elyria, Ohio, a town in which he was employed for some time. His stories of small town life are kind of dark, kind of funny, but they leave a lasting impact. Very thoughtful, very nicely woven together. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Christine-Chioma | 12/20/2013

    " I love the intersection of everyone's lives in this book. It is also a pretty quick read. If you can ever get your hands on Yokohama, California read that too because it's also amazing. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Maureen | 12/15/2013

    " This was a strange book of many short stories about the people and their lives in Winesburg, Ohio. Winesburg is a fictional city about 12 miles south of Lake Erie, so I could somewhat relate but not enough to understand the point of the book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Trisha | 12/15/2013

    " I read this back in college and periodically pick it up and reread again. I think the short vinettes of the residents of Winesburg provide the reader with a perfect snaphot of who may be lurking beneath your own neighbor. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Acolyte | 12/13/2013

    " the hand of the english teacher you had a crush on may have been broken but the piano it played was not. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Emma Darragh | 12/10/2013

    " A brilliant example of the art of the short story. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cecilia Robbins | 12/8/2013

    " This book is truly beautiful. One of my favorites, undoubtedly. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Keith Miller | 12/6/2013

    " "Winesburg, Ohio by Sherwood Anderson (2003)" "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Marcia | 12/5/2013

    " Got into the stories more as it went along. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Charlotte McClain | 12/2/2013

    " Read it in high school while living in Ohio. Didn't like it. Read it as an adult living far, far from Ohio. Still didn't like it. Not my cup of tea. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 sarah louise | 12/2/2013

    " I probably should have known I would end up a writer because "paper pills" has been haunting me since junior year of high school. I probably should have known I'd end up trying not to be emo because the word "grotesques" was second only to the word "angst" in my junior year of high school. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lincwright | 11/29/2013

    " I read this in high school and only remember the two teenagers falling in love. When I reread it later I was surprised at how disturbing some of of the other characters were. Really ahead of its time. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Josephine Ensign | 11/28/2013

    " Loved this book on my second attempt to read it. Is slow getting into but well-worth the effort. If you stick with it the book becomes mesmerizing and powerful. I read this while simultaneously re-reading some of William Maxwell's work and they play off each other well. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 eric mallory morgan | 11/25/2013

    " the sixteen year-old version of me would have given this one star "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rupert | 11/25/2013

    " It's been a long time since I read this book, but it really affected me when I read it. Beautiful miniature portraits with subtle creeping oddness. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Mark | 11/22/2013

    " I did not this book very interesting. The characters just didn't grab my attention. I thought Anderson did a very nice interviewing so many tales, but rural Ohio just didn't float my boat. This might be worth trying again as a mid-winter read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Shawn | 11/21/2013

    " While I found I could relate to several characters and liked several of the stories, I also disliked some of the stories. I doubt I will remember it much a few months from now. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gretchen | 11/8/2013

    " "the grotesque" in people as part of Naturalism era (or something like that)---no God. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Djrmel | 11/2/2013

    " More of a set of characters studies than a group of short stories, this collection reads like a primer for Southern Gothic. Anderson wrote a prologue titled "Grotesque" and it's the unifying theme for all the chapters - the grotesque that's inside everyone. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dan | 10/31/2013

    " Most depressing book ever written... will make you hate yourself, hahaha. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jim Osterhoudt | 10/27/2013

    " This is the greatest collection of short stories ever written. Sherwood Anderson is the person responsible for teaching everyone how to correctly pen the modern short story. I call him the "Master" "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Suzy | 10/19/2013

    " Quirky characters with fascinating flaws. A wrenching description of small-town American people with intricate personal tales "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 eric mallory morgan | 10/15/2013

    " the sixteen year-old version of me would have given this one star "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Andrew Christian | 9/26/2013

    " One of the overlooked classics in American cannon. I usually hate old dead white guys but the structure of vignettes and the small town life they capture so perfectly speak to the spirit of what makes all us vulnerable, imperfect Americans striving to make a place in a large world. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Robin | 9/26/2013

    " I tend to shy away from any book written in a short-story style. This may or may not be considered such, but it read that way to me. I could not keep up well w/the characters. However, the main thing to me being that we all have stories to tell and feel better when we are open to telling them. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Synthia | 9/25/2013

    " I couldn't finish reading it...maybe I don't like short stories... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Remy Kothe | 9/18/2013

    " I can see how this book was ground=breaking in its day. I am glad that I read it but I struggled to get very involved. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Donika | 9/11/2013

    " This is the American Dubliners. But I'll go out on that crazy limb and say it's better. Great for those who appreciate grotesque beauty. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kenny Chaffin | 9/1/2013

    " A great little collection. Pulls together stories of many of the town inhabitants. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Simon | 8/22/2013

    " Anderson is like me; a late bloomer. He started writing after a successful insurance career. He influenced a lot of writers, such as Hemingway. I like his homey, down to earth prose with so much personal glimpses, like sitting next to your grandfather listing to his stories. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lesley | 8/11/2013

    " I really enjoyed this collection of short stories about the fictional town of Winesburg, Ohio. The way the story lines interconnected fascinated me. The descriptions of the townspeople's actions emotions were so intriguing that sometimes I felt like a voyeur. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Djrmel | 7/28/2013

    " More of a set of characters studies than a group of short stories, this collection reads like a primer for Southern Gothic. Anderson wrote a prologue titled "Grotesque" and it's the unifying theme for all the chapters - the grotesque that's inside everyone. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Colleen | 6/25/2013

    " After all of the high praise this has received, I hate to say that I didn't like it, at all. I made it about halfway through before giving up. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Hoezodanbooks | 6/1/2013

    " Just, amazing prose: elegant but never a redundant word. A century old. Timeless at the same time. Wow. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 David Johnson | 5/17/2013

    " What a beautiful little book. A collection of loosely related short stories revolving around the lives of people in the town, twisted by the lives they live that do not match up to the expectations and ideals they hold. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jennie | 5/3/2013

    " how i picture my hometown at the beginning of the twentieth century. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Brian | 2/21/2013

    " What a depressingly depressing book. Frankly, I wouldn't want to spend a day with anyone who'd actively read this in their spare time. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Seytin | 2/4/2013

    " An absolute classic. The characters are some of the best in literature and the writing is beautiful and profound. OH GOD I LOVE THIS BOOK. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Liz Bergeron | 2/1/2013

    " I love Faulkner, Faulkner loved this guy, I love this guy, too. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kevin Lucia | 11/21/2012

    " So excellent. It took a little bit, but as the stories built on each other, became hard to put down. No wonder Bradbury listed it as an inspiration for The Martian Chronicles. The similar structure is very clear... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Abbie | 11/12/2012

    " Apprently, it's S. Anderson's only really good novel, but I've heard some of his short stories are worth reading, too. The best thing about _Winesburg_ is the DEPTH and BREADTH and REALNESS of his characters. They bleed on the page. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kara | 11/11/2012

    " The stories of George Willard and the surrounding grotesques of Winesburg, Ohio is a realistic depiction of a town of individuals trying to live together while finding themselves in an utterly tragic situation. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Elizabeth Penn | 10/14/2012

    " There are several memorable characters that a boy meets in this book that impact him in a variety of ways. I love all of there stories and what he gains from meeting each of them. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sarah Perry | 10/9/2012

    " beautiful, but not without some omniscient gloating "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Joe | 10/6/2012

    " The desperation that can come from small town living has not been captured like this very often. Anderson walks the line between hope and desperation very skillfully. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chamberk | 9/30/2012

    " Pretty good book of interrelated short stories. If I hadn't read Dubliners earlier in the year I would've liked this a lot better but it's still pretty good and a quick read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Leah | 9/26/2012

    " An enjoyable, if a bit slow, simple read. I read Cannery Row immediately afterword, and it really did leave Winesburg in the dust, sorry Sherwood Anderson. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joy | 9/24/2012

    " Very good read. Hard to put down. I highly recommend this to others. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dennis Weiser | 9/14/2012

    " This may actually be the Great American Novel. A masterpiece. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nicholas Miller | 9/7/2012

    " What a wonderful didactic read, to be read over and over. This book forces us to evaluate our lives and our experiences. Love it "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Apoorva | 8/14/2012

    " i didn't finish all the stories in this book, although i did appreciate the premise: stories about all the characters in a small town. i had every intention of finishing it, but man, these people have bleak lives. i had enough of their misery after 4 stories. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cradymc | 8/11/2012

    " Anderson's writing style is so ahead of it's time that the novel could have been published this year. His style and structure were studies by some of the greats, including Hemingway and Fitzgerald. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dylan | 7/20/2012

    " A set of intimate character studies written as a series of episodes set in a small early-20th century town. A solemn tribute to everyday human existence. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Shannon | 7/13/2012

    " You know, this book was good, but I never got sucked in and started hating it by the end of the 2nd month of reading it. Not because it wasn't good, but because I wasn't done with it and wanted to read something engaging. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Martha | 6/10/2012

    " Supposed to be an American classic when I was growing up. Turned out to be rather dull. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Neil | 6/1/2012

    " Overrated and a little boring. Eric Shade's "Eyesores" was heavily influenced by this book and it's a much better read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mike | 5/15/2012

    " good story about a small town "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sandra | 5/1/2012

    " one of the best collections I have ever read. these stories will stick with me forever. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nfrancis | 4/29/2012

    " It was okay but, far from excellent. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sally-jo Waterfall | 3/17/2012

    " I read this a long time ago when I first got into reading. It was recommended by my brother and I have read it about 4 or 5 times. It's more like an anthology. Very strange and interesting characters. It's also a short quick read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ed | 3/12/2012

    " I think this was the first book of related short stories I'd ever read and that alone impressed me. But the prose and compasson and the pathos really resinated with me at 19 and probably still would if I were to reread it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kate | 3/9/2012

    " I read this in English 54: Early Twentieth-Century American Fiction with Professor Louis Renza. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jono | 2/15/2012

    " i read one of these stories on a train in st louis, got two people's applause, and one business card. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mary Warner | 2/8/2012

    " The book started strong. I very much liked Wing Biddlebaum, the main character in the first story. It was interesting to see how the stories linked up, but it was a little staid for my taste. I appreciate that it was considered risque for its time, which really shows how much times have changed. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Zachary | 2/5/2012

    " read in college literature class. Fine. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kristen | 1/28/2012

    " Read this for book club, and glad we did. I wasn't crazy about it while reading it, but after our discussion, it grew on me. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Don Schecter | 1/26/2012

    " an amazing set of stories. An education in writing. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Andrew Christian | 12/28/2011

    " One of the overlooked classics in American cannon. I usually hate old dead white guys but the structure of vignettes and the small town life they capture so perfectly speak to the spirit of what makes all us vulnerable, imperfect Americans striving to make a place in a large world. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mary Warner | 12/28/2011

    " The book started strong. I very much liked Wing Biddlebaum, the main character in the first story. It was interesting to see how the stories linked up, but it was a little staid for my taste. I appreciate that it was considered risque for its time, which really shows how much times have changed. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Pam | 12/16/2011

    " I read this wonderful collection of interelated stories slowly as each story had such impact. The novel covered the gambit of the human condition from passion, death, loneliness, hope and dispair. I was amazed at how modern this book seemed although it was written so many years ago. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Nicci | 11/30/2011

    " Ernest Hemingway said that Sherwood Anderson wrote great short stories. He was right. These stories are beautifully written. They are full of human longing and sadness. The only problem is that they are somewhat the same. Great read, but not one to read straight through like a novel. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jscorse | 9/19/2011

    " Another solid book that really shouldn't be considered a classic. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Elliott | 9/14/2011

    " This really is a masterpiece. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Marissa | 7/6/2011

    " To be honest, I haven't read this book in its entirety since high school, but I've been fascinated ever since with Anderson's portrayal of "the grotesque." Fun read that I definitely need to pick up again soon... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Linda | 5/4/2011

    " Excellent re-read of this older classic. Characters and conflicts would still be found today in any town USA. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Steven | 5/1/2011

    " One of my all-time favorites. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sally-jo | 4/22/2011

    " I read this a long time ago when I first got into reading. It was recommended by my brother and I have read it about 4 or 5 times. It's more like an anthology. Very strange and interesting characters. It's also a short quick read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Matt | 4/14/2011

    " I remember really liking this. I'll have to go back and reread it someday. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Mary | 4/6/2011

    " Well. This is a classic that I had heard about but never read. It surprised me by being so dark and down. Isn't there anything joyful in this little town? I do give it credit for being ahead of it's time. Written in 1915 and covered a lot of topics in a straight forward manner. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Wendy | 3/30/2011

    " Depressing. Short stories about people in the (fictional) town of Winesburg, Ohio. There really is a Winesburg Ohio, but this isn't it. The real one, I understand is in Amish Country. I doubt I will read anymore by Anderson. There are many other things I'd rather read instead! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Zachary | 3/30/2011

    " read in college literature class. Fine. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Beth | 3/19/2011

    " Only just started but enjoying it so far - got to finish it by Monday for book club! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Marcia | 3/13/2011

    " Got into the stories more as it went along. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Hashi | 3/12/2011

    " This is deservedly a classic. Rich, complex character studies; a joy to read. "

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About the Author
Author Sherwood Anderson

Sherwood Anderson (1876–1941) was born in Camden, Ohio. Largely self-educated, he worked at various trades while writing fiction in his spare time. For several years he worked as a copywriter in Chicago where he became part of the Chicago literary renaissance. As an author, he strongly influenced American short-story writing, and his best-known book, Winesburg, Ohio (1919), brought him recognition as a leader in the revolt against established literary traditions.

About the Narrators

Susan McCarthy is the narrator of numerous audiobooks, including such classics as Jane Austen’s Lady Susan and Sherwood Andersen’s Winesburg, Ohio. Her love for reading began as a young girl, when she discovered the Nancy Drew mystery series and was immediately hooked. Also a voice-over artist, she received her training at VoiceTrax San Francisco.

Bobbie Frohman, a third generation Californian, was raised in a large extended family, the niece of cowboys. Early on she developed a deep love of animals, training her dogs to perform with her at dog shows, and as a competitive barrel racer with her beloved horse, Lucky.

David Thorn spent his childhood in the Channel Islands off the coast of France, was schooled in England, and then immigrated to the United States at the age of twenty-three. He is retired from international commerce and currently resides in California.