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Download Why Men Hate Going to Church Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Why Men Hate Going to Church (Unabridged) Audiobook, by David Murrow
3.86 out of 53.86 out of 53.86 out of 53.86 out of 53.86 out of 5 3.86 (22 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: David Murrow Narrator: Erik Synnestvedt Publisher: christianaudio.com Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: February 2009 ISBN:
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It's Sunday morning. Where are all the men? Golfing? Playing softball? Watching the tube? Mowing the lawn? Sleeping? One place you won't find them is in church.

Less than 40 percent of adults in most churches are men, and 20 to 25 percent of married churchgoing women attend without their husbands. And why are the men who do go to church so bored? Why won't they let God change their hearts?

David Murrow's groundbreaking new book reveals why men are the world's largest unreached people group. With eye-opening research and a persuasive grasp on the facts, Murrow explains the problem and offers hope and encouragement to women, pastors, and men. Why Men Hate Going to Church does not call men back to the church - it calls the church back to men. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 David Cole | 1/13/2014

    " this book was really helpful, but it's so negative i can't really read it again! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Klasko | 12/5/2013

    " This book has changed the way I look at corporate church. It has caused me to rethink things to make them more "man friendly." I thnk every wife who gaoes to church alone and every pastor or head of any church ministry should read this book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 O Stephen Peart | 11/13/2013

    " David is passionate about this subject to the point he has a site called churchformen.com. He has done extensive research on the subject and was able to answer numerous questions I've had over the years about men, church and really why do I go. He addresses the subject with practicality and radical thinking that for today's church would be too hard to handle. David helps us to understand a subject that most of us aren't willing to accept, because we rather remain in a pretty world. If you really are interested in understanding the why and interested in making a really difference in men's lives, this is a most read. If not, then go sit in the pew. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Andrea Estelle | 10/6/2013

    " Interesting so far, although I disagree with some points, it does also make some very good points.... there is def. a gap in males who attend church from 18-until they have kids... and what are we doing to reach these guys? The comparison of the attributes of Jesus to the list of qualities of Mars/Venus (male/female) was intriguing and that was really something to think about. I am about half way through this book so I can't give a full review yet.. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jerry | 9/20/2013

    " Helpful in many places though off in others. Murrow sees the need for a culture in the church that attracts challenges men. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Titus Benton | 9/5/2013

    " "philosophy of" parts really dragged, but the practical application stuff was great. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Darrin Niday | 12/2/2011

    " Just finished reading the updated version, and I enjoyed it better than the first, a lot of new info, and ideas to try. Would love to try to do a study on this as well. thanks for the update. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Craig | 11/12/2011

    " This book made me realize how girly our churches have become and inspired me to be more manly. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Itzehoe | 7/3/2011

    " great book - revolutionary "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Elwood | 6/10/2011

    " It's a comment on the feminization of Christianity in North America. Murrow makes some good points. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Drew | 3/6/2011

    " A great book for anyone that is in church leadership...it is a wake up call that churches are doing a poor job of reaching men. They can and should do a better job of providing environments and atmospheres where men can feel comfortable to come, worship, and grow. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jonathan | 11/4/2010

    " Had some interesting thoughts about the lack of masculinity on both the activities and the messages of man modern churches. Definitely an interesting read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Elwood | 10/8/2010

    " It's a comment on the feminization of Christianity in North America. Murrow makes some good points. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Thomas | 7/22/2010

    " An interesting and humorous look into the mind of the unchurched and dechurched man. Murrow shows how church culture has been shaped to attract women and what a church can do to make their place of worship more man friendly.

    Practical and insightful. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dan | 2/25/2010

    " Timely and important book that church leaders and mature Christians should read addressing the issue of why there are so few men in church and how this issue can be addressed to bring men back into church. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Daniel | 12/16/2009

    " Filled with the thoughts every man has about the church experience, this book reflects what happens and what needs to be done.
    It is very informative and should be read by any pastor or laymen in any congregation. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Beth | 8/24/2009

    " This is a great book that all Christians should read. It will inspire you to change your heart on how you view the church, and men's role in the church. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jonathan | 4/11/2009

    " This book exceeded my expectations. Instead of the usual unsubstantiated psychobabble, this book delivered a lot of insight on both men and the church. It’s the best book on the subject that I’ve read so far. I recommend it to both women and men, especially those in church leadership. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cimuchowski | 3/26/2009

    " Excellent and Practical! Lets call men back to church! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Titus | 2/21/2009

    " "philosophy of" parts really dragged, but the practical application stuff was great. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Craig | 12/1/2008

    " This book made me realize how girly our churches have become and inspired me to be more manly. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Margaret | 10/25/2008

    " This book makes some very interesting points about various churches today. I found some of what he said thought-provoking. "

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About the Author

David Murrow is the author of Why Men Hate Going to Church and director of Church for Men, which works to restore a healthy masculine spirit in churches. A sought-after expert and speaker on men’s issues, he spent twenty years honing his skills as a communicator producing and writing award-winning television documentaries, commercials, and specials. He and his family live in Chugiak, Alaska.

About the Narrator

Erik Synnestvedt has recorded nearly two hundred audiobooks for trade publishers as well as for the Library of Congress Talking Books for the Blind program. They include The Day We Found the Universe by Marcia Bartusiak, A Game as Old as Empire edited by Steven Hiatt, and Twitter Power by Joel Comm.