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Download When the Rivers Run Dry: Water - The Defining Crisis of the Twenty-first Century Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample When the Rivers Run Dry: Water - The Defining Crisis of the Twenty-first Century (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Fred Pearce
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (290 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Fred Pearce Narrator: Tony Craine Publisher: Polity Audio LLC Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: July 2010 ISBN:
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Throughout history, rivers have been our foremost source of fresh water both for agriculture and for individual consumption, but now economists say that by 2025 water scarcity will cut global food production by more than the current U.S. grain harvest.

In this groundbreaking book, veteran science correspondent Fred Pearce focuses on the dire state of the world's rivers to provide our most complete portrait yet of the growing world water crisis and its ramifications for us all.

Pearce traveled to more than 30 countries examining the current state of crucial water sources like the Indus River in Pakistan, the Colorado River in the U.S., and the Yellow and Yangtze rivers in China. Pearce deftly weaves together the complicated scientific, economic, and historic dimensions of the water crisis, showing us its complex origins - from waste to wrong-headed engineering projects to high-yield crop varieties that have saved developing countries from starvation but are now emptying their water reserves. He reveals the most daunting water issues we face today, among them the threat of flooding in China's Yellow River, where rising silt levels will prevent dikes from containing floodwaters; the impoverishment of Pakistan's Sindh, a once-fertile farming valley now destroyed by the 15 million tons of salt that the much-depleted Indus deposits annually on the land but cannot remove; the disappearing Colorado River, whose reservoirs were once the lifeblood of seven states but which could easily dry as overuse continues; and the poisoned springs of Palestine and the Jordan River, where Israeli control of the water supply has only fed conflict between Israelis and Palestinians.

The situation is dire, but not without remedy. Pearce argues that the solution to the growing worldwide water shortage is not more and bigger dams, but a greater efficiency and a new water ethic based on managing the water cycle for maximum social benefit rather than narrow self-interest.... Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Roger | 2/20/2014

    " In view of the drought in the southeast this book is a real eye opener. We are not alone and the problem is not getting any easier to solve. After reading this book I am beginning to think that we should not let the engineers get anywhere near our rivers or other water sources. Also, if we are going to 'help' less fortunate nations drill wells we should at least test the water before they use it. What has happened in India and other regions where the UN and private charities have helped drill wells is very sad if not criminal. The book is not without solutions. But we all need to pay attention to this crisis. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brooke | 2/19/2014

    " This book is a great overview of the history and complex present-day challenges facing many of the world's largest river basins. My complaint is that Pearce did not cite any of his sources nor did he include a notes section at the end of his book, which makes it difficult to evaluate. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mlg | 2/19/2014

    " Global look at the looming water shortage that is beginning to hit the planet. Pearce details where humans have made mistakes and what solutions are workable. The book is a wake up call since everyone is likely to be affected. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Hannah Z. | 2/14/2014

    " long and slow, but very interesting and well researched. a wake up call. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Colleen Gardner | 2/8/2014

    " There are plenty of doom-and-gloom environmental books out there, and this is a serious one. However, it should be a national required reading assignment - or international for that matter for those literate few. Just resist the urge to slit your wrists and give it all up. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Mark | 2/6/2014

    " An amazing and factual book about rivers and their role in feeding, providing energy, transport, commerce, and removing waste in our world. I have a much lower view of the "greenness" of hydro-electric power and Ethanol, and am convinced we need to act to protect our aquifers, rivers, and water sources. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Alice | 1/25/2014

    " Many areas of the world have only polluted water as a resource, some areas are running out of water, and some areas have plenty, but are cautious about dispersing it. Many leaders over time have made poor decisions in an effort to leave a legacy. Worldwide, many poor water use decisions are being made. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Douglas | 1/20/2014

    " Documents the worldwide crisis in availability of fresh water. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Kristan | 1/15/2014

    " Not referenced; error prone. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Andrea | 1/11/2014

    " This could be the core text for history students, whether university, continuing ed, or GED in Settlement Houses, where this book is the basis to exploring history and geography... very deep and disturbing... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Patrick | 1/10/2014

    " Global warming pales relative to the looming water crisis; a worldwide view at the mess we're already in adn don't seem to know it "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bryan | 12/16/2013

    " This is a well researched book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Erin | 12/9/2013

    " I haven't stopped talking about this book since I read the first 5 pages--Pearce takes you across the globe with colorful short segments on the increasingly complicated tangle that has become the global water distribution system. One of the best books I've read this year. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Enrico | 11/9/2013

    " Pearce's effort would serve as a frightful chapter on water mismanagement in a much needed "Black Book of Development". Its only, minor fault is being structured as a compilation of various types of errors, lacking a bit of a "big picture" behind. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Scott | 3/12/2013

    " Well written, fascinating and a little scary. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jen | 1/30/2013

    " All the crises you never knew about. Informative, if dry...whoops, no pun intended. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Frank | 8/3/2012

    " solid data and information but repetitive. Could have been better. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kevin | 1/14/2012

    " sobering, yet reassuring look at the world's water situation... worth a read if you care about nature, ecology, or the continuation of the human species... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Paul Brannan | 12/11/2011

    " We're going to hear a lot more about 'virtual water' in the coming years. Fred Pearce's cracking overview spans the globe to document misuse of water resources and spells out why it's an issue for us all, even if in places with abundant supplies. It's a great primer on the topic and very readable. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Avi | 5/27/2011

    " a little gloom and doom but well worth reading "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 David Bowles | 4/1/2011

    " Important book. It was the common reader one year at UF. I was one of the few in my division to enjoy it. I guess it was human enough for some. Don't try to figure out what I mean by that... Just read it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Christopher Mims | 3/24/2011

    " Science journalism at its very best; devastating in its implications. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Chris | 2/23/2011

    " Very readable and packed with fascinating information. But DEPRESSING. The world's fresh water situation is beyond hopeless. And, it going to get worse. Something to look forward to.

    The only problem with this book is the complete lack of citations, which is puzzling. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Andrea | 8/31/2010

    " This could be the core text for history students, whether university, continuing ed, or GED in Settlement Houses, where this book is the basis to exploring history and geography... very deep and disturbing... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Douglas | 3/16/2010

    " Documents the worldwide crisis in availability of fresh water.
    "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tim | 1/2/2010

    " Looks globally at our water crisis, including information from over 30 countries. Describes what doesn't work and what is working across history and locale. Good overview and provides some general application information. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Christopher | 4/3/2009

    " Science journalism at its very best; devastating in its implications. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Hannahhardaway | 1/6/2009

    " long and slow, but very interesting and well researched. a wake up call. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brooke | 8/18/2008

    " This book is a great overview of the history and complex present-day challenges facing many of the world's largest river basins. My complaint is that Pearce did not cite any of his sources nor did he include a notes section at the end of his book, which makes it difficult to evaluate. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Colleen | 8/11/2008

    " There are plenty of doom-and-gloom environmental books out there, and this is a serious one. However, it should be a national required reading assignment - or international for that matter for those literate few. Just resist the urge to slit your wrists and give it all up. "

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