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Download What's Next: Dispatches on the Future of Science Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Whats Next: Dispatches on the Future of Science Audiobook, by Max Brockman Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (79 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Max Brockman Narrator: Erik Davies, Kirsten Potter Publisher: Penguin Random House Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: May 2009 ISBN: 9780307577450
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Will climate change force a massive human migration to the Northern Rim?

How does our sense of morality arise from the structure of the brain?

What does the latest research in language acquisition tells us about the role of culture in the way we think?

What does current neurological research tell us about the nature of time?

This wide-ranging collection of never-before-published essays offers the very latest insights into the daunting scientific questions of our time. Its contributors—some of the most brilliant young scientists working today—provide not only an introduction to their cutting-edge research, but discuss the social, ethical, and philosophical ramifications of their work. With essays covering fields as diverse as astrophysics, paleoanthropology, climatology, and neuroscience, What's Next? is a lucid and informed guide to the new frontiers of science.


From the Trade Paperback edition. Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • If these authors are the future of science, then the science of the future will be one exciting ride! Find out what the best minds of the new generation are thinking before the Nobel Committee does. A fascinating chronicle of the big, new ideas that are keeping young scientists up at night. Daniel Gilbert, author of Stumbling on Happiness
  • A preview of the ideas you're going to be reading about in ten years. Steven Pinker, author of The Stuff of Thought

  • “Captivating. . . . Diverse. . . . While each essay is its own gem, together they form a remarkable dialogue about what it is to be human now, and what it will be in the future. . . . Fascinating. New Scientist

  • Like reading a set of interesting blog posts, but on paper. And most of these folks don’t have blogs! Discover Magazine’s “Things Going On” blog
  • Engrossing. . . . Offers a youthful spin on some of the most pressing scientific issues of today—and tomorrow. . . . Super smart and interesting. New York Observer’s “Very Short List”
  • A fantastic cross-section of societal concerns, focusing largely on issues of ethics and the human mind. . . . This absorbing collection makes easy-to-read but thought-provoking material for even casual science buffs. Publishers Weekly
  • Capaciously accessible, these writings project a curiosity to which followers of science news will gravitate. Booklist

Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Whitney Cowling | 8/27/2013

    " This book contains several essays about current scientific thought and research. Though some of the material was a little over my head, most of the essays were very thought provoking and exciting. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 BAKU | 1/9/2013

    " Sean Carroll's article is the best. ( I hope they'll find the Higgs boson, so everything'll change and I don't have to read his big book about spacetime geometery ) ~ "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ann | 11/2/2012

    " last chapter is the one to read-- talks about knowledge and cross-disciplinary and silo-breaking ways to broaden realms of knowable/workable information rather than become isolated by narrowness/specialization. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kurt Wollenberg | 5/14/2012

    " Some very thought-provoking essays about cosmology and neurobiology. The more philosophical essays left me cold. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kevin | 4/29/2012

    " A wonderful collection of thought-provoking essays musing on the cutting edge of life science today (or, at least, 2007). "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ann-Marie | 12/29/2011

    " Contains a number of fascinating topics that modern scientists are studying. It gives a good range of theories, providing just enough information for an overview. I have been encouraged to look further into some of the ideas based on what I read here. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Irmgard | 11/30/2010

    " Great essays from scientists discussing questions they believe will be of interest in the future. I loved this book, extremely smart and intelligent, something to re-read and talk about! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Michele Hush | 8/24/2010

    " The book explores different areas of science through the eyes of young scientists. Some entries are much better than others, ergo the three-star rating. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Cavolonero | 7/17/2010

    " Sean Carroll's article is the best. ( I hope they'll find the Higgs boson, so everything'll change and I don't have to read his big book about spacetime geometery ) ~ "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ann-Marie | 5/14/2010

    " Contains a number of fascinating topics that modern scientists are studying. It gives a good range of theories, providing just enough information for an overview. I have been encouraged to look further into some of the ideas based on what I read here. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ann | 1/14/2010

    " last chapter is the one to read-- talks about knowledge and cross-disciplinary and silo-breaking ways to broaden realms of knowable/workable information rather than become isolated by narrowness/specialization. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kurt | 7/26/2009

    " Some very thought-provoking essays about cosmology and neurobiology. The more philosophical essays left me cold. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Whitney | 7/12/2009

    " This book contains several essays about current scientific thought and research. Though some of the material was a little over my head, most of the essays were very thought provoking and exciting. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Irmgard | 7/7/2009

    " Great essays from scientists discussing questions they believe will be of interest in the future. I loved this book, extremely smart and intelligent, something to re-read and talk about! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Michele | 7/5/2009

    " The book explores different areas of science through the eyes of young scientists. Some entries are much better than others, ergo the three-star rating. "

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About the Narrators

Erik Davies is an accomplished audiobook narrator and voice-over actor. His stage credits include G.R. Point, Unpublished Letters, and Flats Fixed. Some of his television and film appearances include ER, Third Watch, and a starring role in the hit indie comedy High Society: A Pot Boiler. His audiobook narration has won three AudioFile Earphones Awards.

Kirsten Potter, who graduated with highest honors from Boston University, has narrated numerous audiobooks and has performed for television and in theaters across the country. She has won several awards, including more than a dozen AudioFile Earphones Awards, and been a three-time finalist for the prestigious Audie Award for best narration. Her work has been recognized by the National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts and by AudioFile magazine, among many others. She has alsoperformed on stage, film, and television, including roles on Medium, Bones, and Judging Amy.