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Extended Audio Sample We All Fall Down Audiobook, by Michael Harvey Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (278 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Michael Harvey Narrator: Stephen Hoye Publisher: Penguin Random House Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Series: The Michael Kelly Series Release Date: July 2011 ISBN: 9780307939623
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Chicago cop turned private investigator Michael Kelly is racing to save his city from a deadly new foe: a biological weapon unleashed underground.

When a lightbulb falls in a subway tunnel, it releases a pathogen that could kill millions. While the mayor postures, people begin to die, especially on the city’s grim West Side. Hospitals become morgues. L trains are converted into rolling hearses. Finally, the government acts, sealing off entire sections of the city—but are they keeping people out or in? Meanwhile, Michael Kelly’s hunt for the people who poisoned his city takes him into the tangled underworld of Chicago’s West Side gangs and the even more frightening world of black biology—an elite discipline emerging from the nation’s premier labs, where scientists play God and will stop at nothing to preserve their secrecy.

It’s a brave new world . . . and the most audacious page-turner yet from an emerging modern master.


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Quotes & Awards

  • An intricate, fast-paced crime thriller. . . . The book’s tightly drawn, relentlessly page-turning plot grabs the reader and doesn't let go until it rockets to a truly nasty surprise. In the end, it’s a fascinating story of revenge and expiation as old as the classics Harvey studied in college. Joe Kolina, Chicago Sun-Times
  • It is a measure of the ambition of Michael Harvey’s first novel, The Chicago Way, that we start it thinking about Dashiell Hammett and end it pondering Aeschylus. Patrick Anderson, The Washington Post Book World
  • A smart, stylish debut . . . fresh. . . . The dialogue is snappy and crisp and the characters pop off the page. The plot flows along swimmingly with plenty of surprises. Hallie Ephron, The Boston Globe
  • Michael Harvey’s tightly plotted evocation of the Chicago underworld is set in the present but brings to mind the voices of Chandler and Hammett. Boris Kachka, New York
  • [Harvey] composes punchy noir sentences that he stacks into punchy noir paragraphs that have all the rhythm, irony, and wit of the genre’s manly classics of the 1920s and ’30s. Jennifer Reese, Entertainment Weekly
  • Gritty and witty, The Chicago Way is done the classic Raymond Chandler Way. Harvey’s taut plot, snappy prose, and memorable characters make this debut novel a real winner. Kathy Reichs
  • The Chicago Way is a wonderful first novel. Michael Harvey has studied the masters and put his own unique touch on the crime novel. This book harkens the arrival of a major new voice. Michael Connelly
  • Harvey has written a provocative novel that captures the grittiness of the Windy City and spins a murder mystery with a satisfying and out-of-left-field ending. . . . Readers will find the clipped cadence of Harvey’s dialogue and narrative wonderfully reminiscent of Raymond Chandler. Carol Memmott, USA Today
  • The opening pages are packed with the kind of wry, dry narration that goes down as smoothly as a pulp paperback with a shot of rye. . . . A twisty page-turner. Keir Graff, Booklist
  • Harvey’s debut delivers a fast-paced thrill ride through Chicago’s seedy underbelly . . . [He] masterfully combines the sardonic wit of Chandler with the gritty violence of Lehane’s Kenzie and Gennaro series. Bringing Chicago to life so skillfully that the reader can almost hear the El train in the distance, Harvey is poised to take the crime-writing world by storm. Publishers Weekly (starred review)
  • Heartfelt, ambitious . . . Kelly, a wisecracking Irish Scrapper, slings metaphors like Philip Marlowe and reads Homer and Aeschylus in Greek . . . Harvey ends up delivering the goods. Kirkus
     

  • Harvey shows how a thrilled focused on bioterrorism should be done in his outstanding fourth novel. . . . The complexity of the plot never overwhelms the narrative flow in this utterly persuasive view of a present-day apocalyptic nightmare. Publishers Weekly (starred review)
  • Jolting. . . . Harvey’s feel for Chicago ramps up the fast-paced, grimly realistic action. Marilyn Stasio, The New York Times Book Review
  • Somebody needs to notify the authorities, because Michael Harvey is bound to create havoc and mayhem with his new thriller. . . . Harvey does for the Windy City what Michael Connelly did for Los Angeles: He commandeers it, warts and all, and wrangles it into his fiction. Julia Keller, Chicago Tribune
  • [A] knockout thriller. . . . Harvey dispenses the pressure plays, cruel surprises and heartbreaking setbacks of his plot with crack timing, never allowing the reader a moment to unfasten his seat belt. And all the while Harvey renders [P. I. Michael] Kelly’s Chicago in crisp, tough and ironic prose. Gerald Bartell, The Washington Post Book World
  • The suspense hums and the dialogue is truthfully tough, but it’s the writing that elevates Harvey to the top of the PI genre. He’s the best Chicago novelist . . . since Nelson Algren. Les Roberts, Cleveland Plain Dealer
  • Michael Harvey should be read by all. John Grisham
  • A major new voice. Michael Connelly
  • [A] stellar third novel. . . . Harvey stakes a persuasive claim as the preeminent contemporary voice of Chicago noir. Publishers Weekly (starred review)
  • [A] book-length jolt of pure adrenaline. Kirkus
  • The expert use of Chicago politics that distinguished Harvey’s previous novel, The Fifth Floor, is much in evidence here as well. . . . [T]he action is nonstop, Harvey once again captures the unique zeitgeist of the city, and Kelly, tough, smart, and a bit rough around the edges, is a true native son. Thomas Gaughan, Booklist
  • Harvey drives his third Michael Kelly entry (after The Fifth Floor) like an efficient train. . . . The mixture of high-speed drama and historical elements showcases the author’s journalist roots.  It comes off like a juicy true-crime story with abundant twists, ensuring that the reader is left feeling unbalanced most of the time.  Harvey shares his passion for Chicago, much like Gabriel Cohen does with his Brooklyn crime novels. Teresa L. Jacobsen, Library Journal
  • In The Fifth Floor, Michael Harvey gives us a tale of murder, bare-knuckle mayoral politics, and historical catastrophe–in short, the perfect Chicago detective story, complete with a loving tour of the city’s funkier locales that’ll make any displaced Chicagoan long for home. Erik Larson, author of The Devil In the White City
  • Michael Harvey has done for Chicago what Raymond Chandler did for Los Angeles and Dashiell Hammett for San Francisco. . . . Dazzlingly good. Les Roberts, Cleveland Plain Dealer
  • This is a first-rate detective novel that brings back the glory of those earlier heroes, but with the appeal of today’s modern world. They don’t come much better than this one. The Journal Star
     
  • Harvey is a budding superstar. The Daily News
  • Impressive . . . a tangled, fascinating tale. Dick Adler, The Chicago Tribune
  • A sophisticated caper that keeps readers guessing. . . . Rapt attention is necessary to keep track of the plot twists and characters, but Harvey brilliantly brings all the threads together, and provides a satisfying conclusion. The Missourian
  • Harvey . . . weaves Chicago history and politics with the conventions of mystery writing to create meditations on power—how it’s used, who it helps, and the way it hurts. . . . Honest, smart and funny. Joe Kolina, Chicago Sun-Times
  • A fresh take on the classic American private-eye novel. Reading it feels like putting on a favorite old sweater on a nasty Chicago November day, and it recalls Raymond Chandler and Ross Macdonald at the top of their form. Harvey makes Chicago and its politics a primary character, and the picture he paints is knowing and shrewd. . . . Like Chicago itself, The Fifth Floor is edgy but intoxicating, and Harvey seems ready to join Sara Paretsky at the top of the city’s crime-fiction A-list. Thomas Gaughan, Booklist
  • Supurb. . . . Harvey’s plot twists in all the right places, and his noir-inspired dialogue crackles without sounding showy. Marlowe and Spade would readily welcome Michael Kelly into their fold. Publisher’s Weekly
     
     
    Praise for Michael Harvey's The Chicago Way
  • The efficiency of [Harvey’s] cinematic style . . . suits the brisk, animated shots of Chicago that give the story both grit and authenticity. Marilyn Stasio, The New York Times Book Review

Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lynn Kearney | 2/16/2014

    " Should have been more thrilling than it was. Maybe I'm getting inured to this kind of catastrophic fiction. Didn't like the movie Contagion much, either. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Dawn | 2/6/2014

    " 3 1/2 stars. I'm not sure if I found parts of this confusing because of how it was written or because I haven't read the other books in this series. I suspect it was a bit of both. This book was a decent thriller, and I was a little surprised by the ending. I could see this being made into a movie very easily. And if they did, I'd watch it. I'd like to give at least the first book of this series a try. The main character seems interesting, especially if I'd known the back-story. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Stacy Bearse | 1/29/2014

    " A real departure from earlier books in the series. Borders on the sci-fi. Characters not well developed. Kudos, though, for a very twisty, if improbable plot. Where does Harvey go from here? "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sierra Campbell | 1/14/2014

    " Couldn't really decide of I liked this book or not. It started off with a great premise, a bioterror weapon unleashed in the bowels of the CTA subway. But, it seemed to get lost in the plot or may that was just me. I still enjoyed it though and look forward to Harvey's next book coming out in the spring. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bill | 12/29/2013

    " Bio-terrorism in Chicago sneaks up on the city causing chaos among citizens and a clamp-down by numerous government agencies that anything dangerous has happened. Michael Kelly, Harvey's series hero, once again struts his stuff moving between the mayor, government officials, law enforcement types, and gang-bangers to find the bad guys. The book is an eye opener for how easy it is to paralyze a city, cover up the extent of the terror, and to keep information out of the public eye. The action filled plot will keep you reading well into the wee hours. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kristin | 12/24/2013

    " Lame. I am reminded as to why I don't like most mysteries/thrillers. I thought this one would be good because of the Chicago setting but no. Loose the local brand-name dropping and neighborhood names and this could be Anycity, USA. I remember thinking to myself, okay now it's finally getting to the meat of the story when I realized there was only 1 disc left of the audiobook. Lots of build up to nothing but a fizzle. Also really didn't help that the narrator spoke oddly, like Captain Kirk with stunted sentences and misplaced dramatic pauses but also something else, maybe a poor Clint Eastwood impression? I don't know. The whole book felt like it was just trying too hard. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 David | 12/7/2013

    " Haven't read Harvey before and, based on this book, probably won't read him again. Even the Chicago setting couldn't help this lame techno-thriller. Too many one-dimensional characters and too thin a plot. I'm not sure this wasn't a movie treatment. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 James Boardman | 12/1/2013

    " This is the fourth book in a series set in Chicago. It is a good pulp fiction, fun read. A change of pace from heavier stuff is good, and Michael Harvey serves up this change of pace well. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Sandy | 11/30/2013

    " Not up to the level of his first 2 books. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Cp Bliss | 10/16/2013

    " I could not get far in this book. This was not very well-written, and the characters quickly got annoying. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Susan Fritz | 10/12/2013

    " These are quick easy murder/mystery reads all set in Chicago. Good train reads. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Diane S. | 8/26/2013

    " While I have loved his novels in the past, this one not so much. Maybe because I don't really enjoy reading about bio terrorism but I did enjoy reading about the places I know in Chicago. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tom Hicks | 6/11/2013

    " Michael Harvey is an excellent author and each book he writes is better than the last. Wasn't a big fan of the plot (biowar) but the characters and the way he writes makes up for it. Loved it and can't wait until he writes again. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Eddie | 6/8/2013

    " Another bio-weapon outbreak novel. This time in Chicago. This appears to be the fourth book featuring ex-cop and PI Michael Kelly. Plot moves along and a gang-war is added for extra suspense. Both plots come together at the end. Lots of killing in this book. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Joe O'c | 6/7/2013

    " Good; Continuing character: Michael Kelly; from usual gritty Chicago-based mysteries, the author moves to an implausible biological attack on the city and the PI somehow becomes central to all the events and critical characters "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Scottlmoritz | 12/2/2012

    " Good book with lots of Chicago specific places, etc. Bit scary too. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Donna Agnelly | 8/8/2012

    " Another fine entry into the Michael Kelly series and one which tied up some story lines from the previous book. Although I didn't fine this one quite as compelling as the first three it was a very solid read and Michael Kelly continues to be an interesting and complex character. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bob | 6/22/2012

    " I thought his book was awesome. The "Michael Kelly" series is one of the best out there and just keeps getting better. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bo White | 12/27/2011

    " good mix of Chicago and a federal disaster. At first I was skeptical about the scope of something like biological weapons, but the characters and landscape were undeniably Chicago and that remains a strength of this series. Highly recommended. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jim Wilson | 10/12/2011

    " The fourth installment of the harvey novels. We need more. "

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About the Author
Author Michael Harvey

Michael Harvey is the author of The Chicago Way, The Fifth Floor, The Third Rail, and We All Fall Down, and is also a journalist and documentary producer. His work has received numerous national and international awards, including multiple Emmys and an Academy Award nomination. He holds a law degree from Duke University, a master’s degree in journalism from Northwestern University. He lives in Chicago.

About the Narrator

Stephen Hoye has worked as a professional actor in London and Los Angeles for more than thirty years. Trained at Boston University and the Guildhall in London, he has acted in television series and six feature films and has appeared in London’s West End. His audiobook narration has won him fifteen AudioFile Earphones Awards.