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Download Wanting Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Wanting (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Richard Flanagan
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (543 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Richard Flanagan Narrator: Humphrey Bower Publisher: Bolinda Publishing Pty Ltd Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: November 2009 ISBN:
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The new novel from the internationally acclaimed, best-selling writer Richard Flanagan.

A young Aboriginal girl, Mathinna, is adopted by the most celebrated explorer of the age, Sir John Franklin, and his wife, Lady Jane, to show that the savage can be civilized. When Sir John disappears while looking for the fabled Northwest Passage, Lady Jane turns to the great novelist Charles Dickens for help.

Inspired by historical events, Wanting is a haunting meditation about love, loss, and the way life is finally determined never by reason, but only ever by wanting.

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Yasemin | 2/18/2014

    " Look, I don't mind a bit of Australian historical fiction and as such I thought I would love this book. I have to say I found parts of it a little disturbing and the characters annoyingly pompous and self absorbed. The flow of the book faltered for me as the overuse of punctuation shifted the focal point of the sentences too frequently. The setting was beautifully described giving me a good mental image of each scenes. I think I will still read more work by Richard Flanagan, but this one left me WANTING more. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 William | 2/13/2014

    " Richard Flanagan is an amazing writer. His "Gould's Book of Fish" is one of my top four or five novels of all time. He writes of his native New Zealand and perhaps its that exotic setting that give his books thier gravitas for me. While the aforementioned book was fantasy mixed with history, this one is more in the historical vein and the revelations of the English and their relations with the Aborigines of that land almost literally made me weep. There are 3 concurrent stories that Flanagan masterfully ties together. That of Charles Dickens?!, the islands governor Sir John (also a polar explorer and his wife, and Mathinna the Black whom the governess in an experiment is determined to show that she can take her from the forest and turn into a proper (White-like) English lady. The heartbreak in her story and the larger story of the English treatment of the "blackfellas" as they were called is gut wrenching. As a fancier of history, I was not even aware of the Black Wars waged in hat country and Australia. Another part of the worlds upended by English cultural and military imperialism and genocide...wow..but did I say he book is also laugh out loud funny and the deft use of sarcasm abounds. I found the substory of Charles Dickens to be most dispensable and it was the only thing preventing me from give this book 5 stars as I did his previous one. Gotta put more of his works in my to read pile, pronto. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jon | 2/9/2014

    " I read Amazon reviews and it didnt mention much about half this book focusing on Dickens latter years. The writing was very good but it was not what I expected. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Edward | 1/22/2014

    " The author attempted to tie three events together from the mid 1800's. The events were half a world apart. I found the effort to be wanting. At times the book got me and at times it lost me. One event involved Charles Dickens in England, one in Tasmania and one in Antarctica. I found it all a stretch by the end. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Christie | 1/18/2014

    " Interesting, but also a strange amalgamation of disparate stories (New Zealand/aborigines/cannibalism vs. Dickens/England/Arctic expeditions) that do not seem to entirely fit. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Paige | 1/8/2014

    " The single finest book I have read so far, bar none. Richard Flanagan, a Tasmanian export who has written a few other fabulous novels (including The Death of a River Guide and The Sound of One Hand Clapping), will never get the attention or acclaim he deserves. He is, as a teacher of mine used to say, an old soul, with the intellectual sophistication of Melville but the simplicity of Ernest Hemingway; usually, his writing is pure prose poetry, and it is so beautifully written that the plot is not something you recall until later. He turns language in on itself, reflecting a deep mechanical understanding of it (this is a bit geeky of me, but one of his most impressive skills is that of chiasmus--repeating syntactical elements in reverse order for effect, a kind of stylistic reverse parallelism--in lines like "What saved the child from being a child was that she was a savage, and what saved her from being a savage was that she was a child"). Another gorgeous example of Flanagan's prose that makes the book seem so damn important that it feels like iron in your hands: he describes Charles Dickens looking in the mirror and seeing, in his reflection, "a face that could have been any man and no man, somebody who in his relentless mimicry of everybody had become nobody." The plot pivots around Charles Dickens and the occupation of exotic, uncontrollable land by European colonizers, but missing is the pretense you would expect from an idea like that. The epigraph reads: "You see, reason, gentlemen, is a fine thing, that is unquestionable, but reason is only reason and satisfies only man's reasoning capacity, while wanting is a manifestation of the whole of life." - Fyodor Dostoevsky The theme of desire and the desire of the unattainable is what makes the prose profound and gut-wrenching, but also impressive for not sinking into the quicksand of pretension when considering an idea so philosophically weighty. Richard Flanagan is our greatest living prose stylist. Read Wanting and figure that out before the rest of the world does. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tuck | 12/24/2013

    " voted one of best of 2009 by library journal. not sure why, as its a 2008 book, but will read nonetheless. i really liked his "gould's book of the fish" a fking incredible book for the illustrations if nothing else. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Paul | 12/21/2013

    " A thought provoking and fun read although Flanagan can be melodramatic and a bit over-the-top at times. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Julian | 12/10/2013

    " Gould's Book of Fish one of my favourite awful stories, this is less epic but has put me off Dickens "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Todd Copeland | 12/7/2013

    " Found it a difficult read at first, but as the story unfolded I found the description of colonial life mixed with indigenous cultural dynamics a thought starter around what it was truly like to be an early settler. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 John Martin | 11/22/2013

    " This takes liberties with history. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Candace | 11/15/2013

    " Strange book that somehow works despite the two sets of characters only tangentially connected,some of whom are are historical people...set in England and Tasmania in 19th century. Theme---civilization vs. "savagery" or what is civilization???? "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kathy | 8/8/2013

    " Interesting look at our past. How quickly we condemn nations' "backwardness" when our own past shows we did much the same. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tim | 5/8/2013

    " A beautifully-written, well-crafted book. Heartbreaking, but well worth the time. An excellent way to start a new year of reading. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ayelet Waldman | 4/3/2012

    " Great novel about Charles Dickens. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Damien | 3/15/2012

    " I found this ok, the story of Mathina was good and how the protectors worked with an against the communities, but i just got bored with it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cathy | 3/2/2012

    " Another audio book...the story of Lady Franklin, trying to salvage the reputation of her husband, by enlisting the help of Charles Dickens. Fictional, but based on scant facts. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mike Cavosie | 2/26/2012

    " Pretty much a love/hate feeling about this book. I think that's the point -- hence four stars. I could be wrong. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mark Evans | 1/24/2012

    " A great book. My first for Richard Flanagan. It won't be my last "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mark | 5/21/2011

    " A complex but universal book. The themes infused throughout the story are ones that touch us all. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lyndon | 5/1/2011

    " I loved it. A powerful, beautifully written book weaving Dickens, the Franklins and the story of Mathinna into an incredibly readable treatise on Tasmania's history. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Christie | 4/1/2011

    " Interesting, but also a strange amalgamation of disparate stories (New Zealand/aborigines/cannibalism vs. Dickens/England/Arctic expeditions) that do not seem to entirely fit. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Susan | 1/16/2011

    " Fascinating book connecting the real histories of Charles Dickens and a famous British polar explorer whose name eludes me at this moment, with sidesteps into the Australian outback and the English stage. One of my "wilderness" readings. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Diane | 1/9/2011

    " Interesting, but not quite there for me. One of those parts more interesting than the whole. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sandyboy | 12/10/2010

    " not as good as the magical Gould's Book of Fish but still a very worthwhile and thought provoking book. Flanagan is very talented "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 swkmom | 10/6/2010

    " Interesting look at our past. How quickly we condemn nations' "backwardness" when our own past shows we did much the same. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Pamela | 6/15/2010

    " i enjoyed the story well enough. It was two stories intertwined. What i didn't like was reading a chapter, just getting into it, then the chapter ends. The next chapter is the other story. Just a little unsettling. Hard to get into either one. But, probably a good book club read. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Mike | 6/3/2010

    " Very disappointed. Loved "Gould's Book of Fish", but found this turgid. Gave up after 200 pages. Overly earnest and didn't find it believable. However, most of the reviewers raved about it.
    "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Damien | 5/21/2010

    " I found this ok, the story of Mathina was good and how the protectors worked with an against the communities, but i just got bored with it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kim | 4/13/2010

    " I read this shortly after reading Drood and The Terror by Dan Simmons, and there's a good deal of overlap in characters and themes (Sir John Frnklin, Charles Dickens). That being said, this book is nothing like those. "

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About the Author
Author Richard Flanagan

Richard Flanagan is the author of the novels Death of a River Guide, The Sound of One Hand Clapping, Gould’s Book of Fish, The Unknown Terrorist, and Wanting. He lives in Tasmania.

About the Narrator

Humphrey Bower is a gifted and versatile actor. Since obtaining a BA in English Language and Literature at Oxford University he has worked extensively in theater, television, and audiobook narration. Humphrey won the prestigious Audie Award for his performance of The Family Frying Pan by Bryce Courtenay, and has been short-listed for an Audie Award for his performances of Gould’s Book of Fish by Richard Flanagan and Brother Fish by Bryce Courtenay. Humphrey’s sensitive and intelligent readings are highly regarded and he is well-known for his capacity to perform a variety of accents. He was won twenty AudioFile Earphones Awards.