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Extended Audio Sample Tripping the Prom Queen: The Truth about Women and Rivalry, by Susan Shapiro Barash Click for printable size audiobook cover
2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 2.00 (149 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Susan Shapiro Barash, Shelly Frasier Narrator: Shelly Frasier Publisher: Tantor Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: March 2006 ISBN: 9781400172009
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Tripping the Prom Queen is a groundbreaking investigation into the dark secret of female friendship: rivalry.

Susan Shapiro Barash has exploded the myth that women help one another, are supportive of one another, and want each other to succeed. Based on interviews with women across a broad social spectrum, she has discovered that the competition between women is more vicious precisely because it is covert. She tells us: 

  • Why women can’t and won’t admit to rivalry.
  • How women are trained from an early age to compete with one another.
  • In which areas women most heatedly compete.
  • How rivalry is different among women than among men.
  • The differences between competition, envy, and jealousy.
  • When competition is healthy and when it isn’t.
  • Why women find it irresistible to “trip the prom queen.”
  • Useful strategies to stop the competition and forge a new kind of relationship with other women.

Whether you’ve tripped the prom queen or been tripped yourself, you will discover an engrossing exploration of this female phenomenon, as well as a beacon of hope for better, more fulfilling relationships.

Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • “Overall, this study provides a helpful starting place for any woman wondering if it’s possible to get what she wants without hurting or being hurt.”

    Publishers Weekly

Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sharon | 1/21/2014

    " Read this book then watch the movie all about Eve it's very intresting. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Emily | 1/18/2014

    " Some of the stories are really scary. I think that this sort of competition really does go on between women, but I don't feel it had affected me to the degree presented in the book. I think that this problem affects an older generation to a more significant degree. In general, I still feel that the men I work with are a lot more competitive that the women. Although I agree that women, in general, are more competitive about other aspects of life, especially women that are more "traditional". However, I don't feel that my friends give a shit about who gets married or has kids first, and I definitely have never had a friend try to steal my boyfriend or anything. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 cagey | 1/14/2014

    " The book was a good selection for a book club because it provided an excellent discussion. However, the author's methodology was incredibly lame and she included WAY too many examples from the media and entertainment - such as plotlines from TV shows and movies to prov - to prove her point. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Amanda | 1/13/2014

    " This was interesting, but not super informative. It was read fabulously though! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Lisa M. | 1/11/2014

    " OK book, but made for a really interesting book club discussion. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Gina | 12/22/2013

    " I couldn't get through this book, at all! I think perhaps it may be one that I skim through again at a later date... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Betsy | 12/15/2013

    " I thought this book was quite interesting. I thought the author repeated a lot during the book but the things she brought up I've found to be somewhat true. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lacey | 12/13/2013

    " This book changed my life. It illuminated almost every female relationship that I have ever had. I think every woman should read it. It does go a little far, at times. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Alicia Shafer | 11/11/2013

    " Seemed like a good pop-psychology kind of book that examines women's relationships. It just didn't grab me fast enough. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Gina | 8/12/2013

    " Sure, women are competitive, but just as much as men are in my mind. I was hoping this book would actually shed some light on this potentially interesting topic, and was disappointed when it didn't do anything but provide us more examples that, women are competing with one another. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kate | 7/8/2013

    " You have to give the author credit for trying to provide some solutions to a tough problem. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Elizabethryancey | 5/9/2013

    " Interesting. Explores why women treat each other they way they do. WHY do we do that anyway?! Practical examples were not very relevant to my lifestyle, but the larger ideas were intriguing. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jennifer | 2/9/2013

    " We're so darn mean to one another. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Sophie | 1/22/2013

    " The nature and function of rivalry among women needs to be examined, especially in relationship to feminism. Unfortunately, this book doesn't live up to the task. It is poorly written, poorly reasoned, and hands down the most demoralizing read I've had this year. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Nicole | 7/5/2012

    " BC Hostess: Adrienne-This is a sociology style book that made for an interesting discussion but not a very fun read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alicia | 5/22/2012

    " Fascinating topic and presented in a very readable way! Very well-organized. I enjoyed the personal testimonials combined with text, and I literally flew through this book in a few days. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Valarie | 5/3/2012

    " I've learned that, girls, we AREN'T crazy...there are a lot more women who believe in petty rivalries than in sisterhood. It's really a shame, and this book helps a bit by reminding you that it isn't all in your head. It's not any more helpful than that, though. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Mary Pat | 1/28/2012

    " This book was an interesting look into the world of female competition. It was a bit dry at times but made me think more about my personal experiences. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 EAK | 9/11/2011

    " Explores why women often feel the need to drag each other down, rather than celebrate our successes. A frustrating reality. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Camille | 11/15/2010

    " I couldn't even finish it. I couldn't. I didn't find it helpful at all. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 windyheaven | 6/24/2010

    " Are women seriously as shallow as portrayed in this book? "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rita | 4/16/2010

    " I found this thru Oprah magazine...very interestig read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Amy | 4/4/2010

    " this is such an awesome book! i highly recommend. it helped me let go of some things i needed to. "

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About the Author
Author Susan Shapiro Barash

Susan Shapiro Barash, an established writer of nonfiction women’s issue books, has authored nine books, including A Passion for More: Wives Reveal the Affairs That Make or Break Their Marriages; Second Wives: The Pitfalls and Rewards of Marrying Widowers and Divorced Men; and Mothers-in-Law and Daughters-in-Law: Love, Hate, Rivalry and Reconciliation. She is a professor of critical thinking/gender studies at Marymount Manhattan College and a member of the Women’s Leadership Board at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard, where she mentors graduate students.