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Download Through the Children’s Gate: A Home in New York Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Through the Children’s Gate: A Home in New York Audiobook, by Adam Gopnik Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (632 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Adam Gopnik Narrator: Adam Gopnik Publisher: Highbridge Audio Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: September 2006 ISBN: 9781598872705
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The children’s gate is an entrance to Central Park that leads to the playground. Gopnik explores that entrance in metaphor and experience as he recounts his family's return from Paris to New York——a seemingly secure, almost oddly child-friendly New York—in the fall of 2000. Gopnik describes not a city but an extended urban family, and a home charmed by the civilization of childhood. It's a charm that is simultaneously protect from, challenged by, and even shaped around the event that is soon to follow.

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Katrin Stamatis | 2/17/2014

    " Gopnik's sentimentality and his obsession with parallel sentence construction threatened to ruin my enjoyment of these essays. That said, he does have a compelling writing style and a beautiful way of capturing certain universal emotions. I especially enjoyed what felt like his more honest essays - one chronicling his years with an old German psychoanalyst, another comparing his apartment search in New York to the search of a couple in the late 19th century. "Bumping Into Mr. Ravioli" and "Death of a Fish" were also charming vignettes about the complexities of raising small children. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Suzanne | 2/11/2014

    " Although I didn't think this was as good as "Paris to the Moon" it should be a must-read for New Yorkers with children or thinking about having children while living in the city. I particularly liked Gopnik's concern over his daughter's over-programmed imaginary friend and the adventures of trick-or-treating in high rise apartment buildings. Basically this is an enjoyable read, well-written with warmth and humor. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 sima | 2/5/2014

    " The first 100 or so pages of the book dragged, but as Gopnik got into the book, the vignettes become more telling and relatable in the Paris to the Moon sense. Well written and witty, but not a "can't put it down" read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Megan Arnold | 1/31/2014

    " Reading this book and LOVING it! He alternately writes about living in New York in a way that makes me passionately think YES, that's EXACTLY how I feel! and make me laugh aloud, which I rarely do when reading. (that move can get you some odd looks on the subway by the way - beware) "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Christopher | 1/15/2014

    " Gopnik writes frequently for The New Yorker, and the writing in Through the Children's Gate is of the same style. He moved back from Paris to NY at the same time I lived there, and from my limited experience, it seems he nails what it means to live there and love it. Some chapters are clearly asides, pieces likely published in the New Yorker first. But they are held together with a strand of thoughts about raising his children in the city, the gate in the title being a reference to one of the entrances to Central Park. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Linnea | 1/8/2014

    " Gopnik's descriptions of life in NYC are so apt and beautifully written. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 JJ | 1/7/2014

    " Sorry to say I found the writing very dry and slow, with occasional bursts of light and humour. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Stephanie | 1/6/2014

    " Gopnik's stories about his kids adjusting to life in New York are great. His philosophical musings about New York and the world today are long and rambling and generally uninteresting. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jskrzypczyk | 12/16/2013

    " A little more philosophical than the last... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Maureen | 12/13/2013

    " I didn't love this nearly as much as I did "Paris to the Moon" (one of my favorite books ever). Maybe it's because I have my own issues re: living in NY; I don't know. I just found this much more difficult and less enjoyable of a read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Marcy Huggins | 11/9/2013

    " An excellent collection of short essays on life in New York, raising children, finding a life philosophy, and being in a marriage. I laughed, I cried, I felt enriched. Can't think off a better recommendation. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 BeckyTalbot | 10/25/2013

    " I'm putting this here for "Bumping into Mr. Ravioli," which is one of the funniest nonfiction pieces I read this semester. It is a great use of examining the particular to reach the universal. I've yet to read the other essays, but I'm looking forward to finding more of what this author has written. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Marlies | 10/25/2013

    " Some of the essays, especially the first one, are a little hard going, but overall, a very nice book about New York and raising children there. You will especially love the stories about Olivia and her imaginary friend. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Wendy | 10/21/2013

    " Couldn't really submerge myself in this non-fiction. Too much like real life perhaps. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Molly | 9/5/2013

    " Classic Gopnik, but this collection didn't rise to the level of Paris to the Moon. Regardless, you're still in the hands of a prose stylist. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dani | 8/9/2013

    " Love New York, love Gopnik's writing. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 dakron | 12/21/2012

    " Tedious at times (brilliantly tedious, but tedious nonetheless), but the final two essays are just stunning. Adam Gopnik never alows his overt intellectualism trip up his innate honesty. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kathleen | 10/12/2012

    " I wanted to like this more, and I wanted to be more amused. But Gopnik managed, in places, to make New York really boring. A few chapters saved it for me, including the one featuring Mr. Ravioli, his daughter's imaginary friend who is always too busy to play with her. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Parker | 8/14/2012

    " A reflection on raising children in post 9/11 New York. Thoughtful, funny stories about his children growing up in a New York he never knew as a child. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kupkake | 6/6/2012

    " So far I can't help comparing it to Paris to the Moon, which I found utterly charming, while thus collection of essays is indeed "dense" and intense. Maybe its the comparison of NYC to Paris? Open mind, I'm still at the beginning. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Jennifer | 4/25/2012

    " Loved From Paris to the Moon, found this one pretentious and unreadable. Gave up (gasp) about 80 pages in. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jana | 3/18/2012

    " Good writing, pleasant stories about living in New York City with children post 9/11 and post living in Paris. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Landismom | 9/12/2011

    " There are few writers that can make me feel full of light when I'm reading them. Gopnik is one of them. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 haetmonger | 7/19/2011

    " People are totally right when they accuse Gopnik's writing of being overly precious, but I still think it's frequently great anyway. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Stephanie | 6/5/2011

    " Gopnik's stories about his kids adjusting to life in New York are great. His philosophical musings about New York and the world today are long and rambling and generally uninteresting. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 David | 5/17/2011

    " A collection of charming, polished essays. Satisfying, but by the end, like a stuffy dinner party, it was all a little forced, a little self-conscious, and not at all relaxing. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Nick | 3/18/2011

    " Really beautiful book, though it doesn't particularly make me want to live in New York. Gopnik is such a great writer, though - he could write nutritional information on cereal boxes and I would read it. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kim | 1/21/2011

    " Liked from Paris to the Moon much better. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Landismom | 8/22/2010

    " There are few writers that can make me feel full of light when I'm reading them. Gopnik is one of them. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Carla | 4/5/2010

    " A very different read for me, but was glad to be introduced to this book. Comical, clever and enjoyable. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anne | 1/14/2010

    " Both a sweet book, full of fondness and warmth, and thought provoking about what it means to be alive in modern times. I enjoyed it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jana | 10/17/2009

    " Good writing, pleasant stories about living in New York City with children post 9/11 and post living in Paris. "

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About the Author
Author Adam Gopnik

Adam Gopnik has been writing for the New Yorker since 1986. His work for the magazine has won the National Magazine Award for Essay and Criticism and the George Polk Award for Magazine Reporting. From 1995 to 2000, Gopnik lived in Paris, where the newspaper Le Monde praised his “witty and Voltairean picture of French life.” He now lives in New York with his wife and their children.